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Updated 7/15/24 (new stuff) From the Bench,,,,,,,,,,(How to) all in one running thread/

Bowpoopers

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I'd never seen a set like this sold before,,,but,,,,,it will be fine when done, the wood is a really near perfect match among the pieces.

I leave all my builds and major repair work to people like Gunplumber, who built all my fals.

Correcting stuff like this in this wood pile, all I really do metal wise.

Oven cleaner is the worse, what I use to strip wood does play well with oven cleaner, about choked myself a couple times, now I smell wood to make sure, no oven cleaner before stripping.

House hold bleach degrades over time, I have a really old jug, and used properly and quickly, can do certain things with wood better than anything else, but mostly, best to avoid it on wood and just use regular wood bleach.

This is a photo below of how badly these were never finished properly for fit.

View attachment 400918
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Any suggestions appreciated in the top hole is a snapped of screw. My best thought right now is to tack a prick punch to it and hope for the best.
 

yellowhand

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View attachment 401151 Any suggestions appreciated in the top hole is a snapped of screw. My best thought right now is to tack a prick punch to it and hope for the best.

If that is a swing swivel placement,,,,pretty sure it is, but have learn to ask;

I'd take a very small diameter drill bit, and drill down beside the screw, at say four points, then reach in with needle nose pliers, and wiggle/turn it out of the hole.

Then take a drill bite large enough to just cover all the holes, using the original screw hole placement as a pilot hole, and drill it out, and then glue in a roughed up dowel correct diameter of the bit used.

Let dry 24 hours, mount the swivel, re-drill the screw hole, all done.
 

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Got the not fully finished, contoured hand guards just above all done!

Shaped them while mounted to one of my rifles, hence all the painters tape to protect my weapon, the old fashioned way, MK1 eyeball and a shit ton of sand paper!:)LOL

Once I got them properly shaped, completed the internal spaces, mounted the metal bits in the guards, glued in nice and tight, etc.

Ready for color and oiling tomorrow!

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Bowpoopers

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If that is a swing swivel placement,,,,pretty sure it is, but have learn to ask;

I'd take a very small diameter drill bit, and drill down beside the screw, at say four points, then reach in with needle nose pliers, and wiggle/turn it out of the hole.

Then take a drill bite large enough to just cover all the holes, using the original screw hole placement as a pilot hole, and drill it out, and then glue in a roughed up dowel correct diameter of the bit used.

Let dry 24 hours, mount the swivel, re-drill the screw hole, all done.
Yes that’s is my worst looking swing swivel thus far. Thanks for tip. Welder laughed and asked how burnt I want the wood.
 

yellowhand

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Yes that’s is my worst looking swing swivel thus far. Thanks for tip. Welder laughed and asked how burnt I want the wood.

I've seen far worse!

When you drill down beside the screw, don't have to go real deep, to be able to snag it with needle nose pliers, and twist it out, normally.

A 1/4 inch dowel should cover it after drilling out the old screw placement.

Measure ya dowel, so you can tap it flush loaded with glue, then ya ain't got to deal with the end sticking up, which in tight areas, kinda a pain.

I cut them, old fashion way, mark the center line on the stock, then drill one hole, mount the swivel, get it straight, drill the other pilot hole and screw it down tight, then take a sharp number 11 exacto blade, and etch around the swivel as deep as possible, remove swivel, and using a 1/4 inch sharp chisel, dig out the wood, fitting the swivel as I go for depth.

Ya cutting with the grain, mostly, so you get nice clean sides and front and rear...
 

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If you come up with no good way to get out that screw find an autobody spot weld cutter. It's like a small hole saw. Put pilot bit up against the broken screw, hog out a circle, chip out the inside of circle until you can access the screw with vice grips. You'll be left with a round hole ready for plugging with a dowel. If dowel is tight fitting use glue. If not then use epoxy.

Edited to say that this is YH' s thread and he's a master. I'm a ham-fisted amateur with no expectation to get good at stuff. You should do what he recommends, and regard my posts as comedy relief.
 

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If you come up with no good way to get out that screw find an autobody spot weld cutter. It's like a small hole saw. Put pilot bit up against the broken screw, hog out a circle, chip out the inside of circle until you can access the screw with vice grips. You'll be left with a round hole ready for plugging with a dowel. If dowel is tight fitting use glue. If not then use epoxy.

Edited to say that this is YH' s thread and he's a master. I'm a ham-fisted amateur with no expectation to get good at stuff. You should do what he recommends, and regard my posts as comedy relief.

This is everyone's thread for how too's,,,,,!!!!

I've learned, by listening to everyone!

You do good work amigo,,,,,,of course the addiction to 870's can be overcome, maybe.:)LOL
 

Bowpoopers

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If you come up with no good way to get out that screw find an autobody spot weld cutter. It's like a small hole saw. Put pilot bit up against the broken screw, hog out a circle, chip out the inside of circle until you can access the screw with vice grips. You'll be left with a round hole ready for plugging with a dowel. If dowel is tight fitting use glue. If not then use epoxy.

Edited to say that this is YH' s thread and he's a master. I'm a ham-fisted amateur with no expectation to get good at stuff. You should do what he recommends, and regard my posts as comedy relief.
Real work doesn’t allow for constant hobby work. I feel it would be difficult to keep the pilot bit in the metal screw without walking to softer wood? I should get a shot at it this weekend. I think YH makes sense to me. But all ideas are worth a thought.
 

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Real work doesn’t allow for constant hobby work. I feel it would be difficult to keep the pilot bit in the metal screw without walking to softer wood? I should get a shot at it this weekend. I think YH makes sense to me. But all ideas are worth a thought.
Run pilot bit along the broken screw. The hole you'd make won't be centered on the screw but it won't matter.
 

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This is a good subject for a "How to".

When I hit the shop, will take a few minutes and drive a screw into a hunk of lumber, whack off its head, then show how the method I described up above works.

All of this type work, has a hundred different ways to get to the exact same result, being it repairs, refinishing, products used or not used.

One gentleman that does stock work, only takes his work down to 120 grit,,,,,,,,,,me,,,,,,I take anything I work on down to 500 grit or higher, he compensates by using a couple extra coats of finish oil, where as I don't need to do that, to achieve the exact same level of finish.

Another swears by oven cleaner for stripping wood, me, I would not use that stuff on my oven, but,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,we end up at the exact same place,,,, eventually.

I don't believe I've ever mentioned finish oils here, might have, ain't checking,;) but discussions on finish oils around here, damn near end up in brawls,:( so, I try and avoid them.

A lot of the methods I display here are "old school", one because I'm old, :)LOL, and two,,,,I learned much of this as a youngster from my father who was a real master wood worker.

He'd cut down an oak tree, slab it, dry it, and then make by hand mostly, items that turned out like this below;

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People forget, that wood workers of yesterday, were making extremely beautiful and durable wood products mostly by hand, including some of the finest gun stocks, long before the internet, Lowes, and the next newest and crazy method on display today.

I saw a display in a wood working publication of a wood working method that had everyone in awe, in the comments section,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,I smiled,,,,and moved on, why,,,,,,,,,because the method was a common one used in and around the year 1700 by nearly all ship builders of that time.

I use joint lay out tools designed and in use in Japan,hundreds or even thousands of years ago, still in use today, why, because they work, have passed the test of time.

The tragedy of today, in this "modern era", we've lost many of the abilities, once common knowledge, for a man to walk out into his local forest, pick a tree, fell the tree, then process it into everything needed or wanted in a home from simple workable construction to complex and beautiful items.
 

yellowhand

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As promised above!

Took longer to take pictures than to actually do this;

Got them in sequence.
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You can buy ready made dowel plugs, or just make your own, by buying a 4 foot section, and roughing up the sides as shown above with a set of pliers.

You normally get sheared off screw heads by having too small a pilot hole and driving a screw into say walnut or not drilling your pilot hole deep enough.

Original gun screws for surplus wood, not the best in the world, when I replace or make new screws, I start with stainless steel ones and reshape the heads.

When ya drilling into say dense walnut, make sure your pilot hole is as large and as deep as the screw will be drive as the shaft of the screw to be used, hard woods are dense and all it takes is to catch the threads to be able for it to hold strong and tight.

I have a bar of soap on the bench, someplace, and on old screws, will often soap up the threads to run them back in, makes then slide in and limits broken off heads...........


And, I have got to stop using a "new" Gunplumber creation, built on a matching Brit kit to fit hand guards!:)LOL

With all the dust in the shop, that is the cleanest rifle in the world as every time I use it, to fit guards, it gets cleaned again.!
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B TW,,,,,,making this stuff as detailed as possible, I'm not trying or intending to insult anyone looking into this thread.

I've found, that MANY younger people, simply don't even know the proper way to use a hammer, screw driver, etc,,,,,now they can fix my cell phone, lap top computer with ease, joining a couple pieces of wood, a never learned task for many of them.

So, I leave nothing out, start to finish................
 

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Ah, the holes relieve pressure. I was imagining a fracture below flush where one has to excavate around the shank just to get a tool on it.
 

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Ah, the holes relieve pressure. I was imagining a fracture below flush where one has to excavate around the shank just to get a tool on it.

Yep, breaks the tension holding the screw, then you just take your long nose pliers, place the two plier noses into two holes, grab the head, and normally, they will screw right out without tension being on the remaining screw piece!

Any dent or damage from the pliers noses, goes away when you drill and plug it.
 

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Forgot,,,,if ya get a really stuck one,,,just add four more tiny drill holes, at that point, they damn near fall out on their own.

That plug/dowel, was a 5/16ths I believe with matching drill bit, maybe a hair smaller...
 

Bowpoopers

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Yep, breaks the tension holding the screw, then you just take your long nose pliers, place the two plier noses into two holes, grab the head, and normally, they will screw right out without tension being on the remaining screw piece!

Any dent or damage from the pliers noses, goes away when you drill and plug it.
Thank you greatly. I understand always easier said than done. I think I can do it.
 

Bowpoopers

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Forgot,,,,if ya get a really stuck one,,,just add four more tiny drill holes, at that point, they damn near fall out on their own.

That plug/dowel, was a 5/16ths I believe with matching drill bit, maybe a hair smaller...
If I get in too big a pinch I have a small wood lathe I’ll make the plug.
 

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Thank you greatly. I understand always easier said than done. I think I can do it.
You got this!

You've got plenty of room to work with, just drill the holes, might need 8, try four first, and see if it comes out.

You bang/dig up the wood a little, no problem, will all be hid by the plug, and the plug hid by the swing swivel!

If the wood is really hard, set the nose of the pliers into a couple of holes, and bang on the pliers with the palm of your off hand, or even a small hammer to grab the head.
 

yellowhand

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If I get in too big a pinch I have a small wood lathe I’ll make the plug.
I've got a stack of rounds, walnut, poplar, hickory, etc, all different diameters, shades of natural color, for the plug work I do here.

Now, the same idea works, if you have a hole to fill on the outside of a stock, that shows.

Except there, you need a donor piece of wood that matches the stock being worked upon, with close matching grain lines, and a set of different size "plug cutters" and a good size drill press.

Cut your plugs that will be used to fill the hole, drill out the hole to proper diameter of the plug, line up the grain lines, glue into place, and this repair nearly disappears when you apply your finish color and oil magic,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, if done properly.

Just did one of these repairs, forgot to take before and after pictures, next time.... ;)
 

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Its recessed as well. Also very grainy. I’ll take pics as it goes if you would like them in a different thread very understandable. Again thank you
 

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Its recessed as well. Also very grainy. I’ll take pics as it goes if you would like them in a different thread very understandable. Again thank you

This thread is every ones "How to place", so post up here.

They made it a sticky, so the information won't be lost to time, or hard to locate.

You're doing a ""How to, so post up the results here.

Happy to help, people have helped me, many times.

And, my wife says I need a lot of help most days!:)LOL
 

Bowpoopers

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Starting with a snapped off screw for swivel mount.
IMG_0463.jpeg
Next I drilled six hole about 1/4” around the screw (not deep enough).
IMG_0464.jpeg
Cleaned up around the screw with a fine chisel and pick.
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After much wiggling and twisting I redrilled deeper alongside the screw. More wiggling twisting. Then more drilling. It really doesn’t take much for this walnut to hold. In reality only about 20 minutes to extract the screw.
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Drill and plug later today if time and family allows. I’ll post the final when I can.
 

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Starting with a snapped off screw for swivel mount. View attachment 402822 Next I drilled six hole about 1/4” around the screw (not deep enough). View attachment 402823 Cleaned up around the screw with a fine chisel and pick. View attachment 402824 After much wiggling and twisting I redrilled deeper alongside the screw. More wiggling twisting. Then more drilling. It really doesn’t take much for this walnut to hold. In reality only about 20 minutes to extract the screw. View attachment 402825 Drill and plug later today if time and family allows. I’ll post the final when I can.

Outstanding!
That was a long ass swing swivel screw!
Well done Sir! (y) (y) (y)
 

Bowpoopers

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Thank you. As far as screw length it’s a screw I pulled out of a green plastic what I believe to be imbel stock. I’ve used that same screw to threat multiple holes. I do believe my main issue is to small of a pilot hole. That and this particular piece of wood has been a Can’t Understand Normal Thinking from the start.
 
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