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Updated 7/15/24 (new stuff) From the Bench,,,,,,,,,,(How to) all in one running thread/

yellowhand

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Follow up progress on the last up above;

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The shotgun stock above, had a near complete top section cracked, both sides, but,,,,also found, it had a center line crack on the bottom front running back a good inch and half.
So, ran a through and through across the bottom one, then placed two from the top rear, and two up from the bottom front, now, nice and secure.
The tail chip off replaced and shaped down.
Owner wanted threaded rod in it as well, its a military issue riot shotty, so, wanted "arsenal type" repairs.
I'm not doing the final finish, just what you see here, fix the front and rear, fit the butt plate, owner is going to final it himself.
So, it goes home tomorrow.

Camera battery died, but the chip out where the butt plate hinge pin rest on the butt plate, filled them with walnut, shaped and fitted butt plates, will post up some pictures of them tomorrow completed. It is real thin in that area, so square up the edges where the donor wood goes, and the resting edge, then clamp them over night and shape. I seal these areas with a high temp melting polymer to seal up the edges etc. Keeps it from degrading the glue joints, adds a little strength.

The sheered off complete top repairs of the one butt, all done, and ready for color, hand fitted to the lower, more pictures of it tomorrow finished with repairs, nice and solid now.

A lot of threaded brass rod got used up today.:)LOL
 

yellowhand

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Lost my internet for nearly 24 hours, which was kinda nice, like being back in time 25 years.:)LOL

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Hand guards are thin and fragile to begin with.

When you get cracks up front in the recoil tube, glue alone will not hold.
Ya got to back it all up with reinforcements.
I glue up the crack, then grind down over the recoil crack with the dremel with a half inch sanding drum, more glue,then insert a 5/8th walnut dowel, cut in half, less to remove later, once solid, use the dremel again, and remove everything above the ground out and now, new wood over the crack, and it holds up far better.
Same thing for the rear barrel channel cracks, you just grind down over the crack after glueing it up, and insert a 1 inch dowel, walnut, over the crack, trying to fill the whole channel, once dried, solid, use the dremel again to remove everything not needed.

One of these panels, had a crack from rear, over half way forward in the face side of the panel, glued that up, will use very thin hobby plywood now that front and rear cracks are done up, and glue it in place, to fully support the long ass crack.

Test fit the panels to a rifle, and leave as much new wood as possible in place, to help hold them together going forward, but still fit properly.

Seal up the inside cracks fully, which often leaves a gap in the crack on the outside of them.
Once the inside is glued up and reinforced, use CA type glue, run a bead in the outside crack, then sand the area, which will fill the inside of the crack with wood dust, might need to do this twice to get the area back flat with the surface wood, also goes a long way to hide the repair.
 

yellowhand

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Thanks again for the info!
Just gotta thread them, then will give it a go this week.
View attachment 394113

I use a small drill to thread mine and also, to slowly screw them into the pilot holes on the stocks.

I place a small mark on the threaded rod, to know the depth I'm running them into the work.
 

yellowhand

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Here are the panels all trimmed up and also the placement of the reinforcements for the long side cracks in the panel bodies.

One can never have tooooooooooooooooo many clamps, in all sizes and shapes.:)LOL

My wife walks into the shop when I'm doing this, comments, you missed a spot, and leaves laughing.

The long strips for the body cracks, is ripped 3/4 wide pine, about as thick as a quarter.
Pine and coach wood, well, pine is the southern version of Aussi coach wood!
Its very light in color, and easy to stain.

The wood over the vent holes, easy to remove, use a drill bit a hair smaller than the vent holes and clean out the corners, then used an Xacto blade to trim out the sides, all done.

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I have old hand guards to pull donor pieces off of for repairing these, and like that one nose job, I just used the band saw and cut off an exact piece to match the one panel with the missing hunk of its nose, as well as the one with rot out around the rivet.
Dig out all of the rot, down to clean wood, fill the cavity with scrap wood, and then top it with your final piece, cutting it oversized, so as to allow you to final shape it back to proper contour and shape.
When you pull the the clamps off, if you need to add more wood, you have a tiny void, etc, do it, then when all filled, sand and shape to final shape.
All done, ready for color and oiling.
 

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BrunoN

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Wasn't able to look for a 3/32 die this weekend. But in our good size "master" set out our shop I found one that I think should work just fine.
Two closest sizes were a 3mm, worked but didn't cut very deep.
Second was a 4-40 NC. This cut a much deeper thread and will probably be the one I go with.
Didn't seem to shrink the od meaning it wasn't too small of a die, and it fits nicely in a 3/32 drill hole. I can't yank it back out by hand. The one i cut 3mm was the same, but I feel this one will leave more area for the glue to bind in the threads.
4-40NC on the left 3mm on the right.
 

yellowhand

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Wasn't able to look for a 3/32 die this weekend. But in our good size "master" set out our shop I found one that I think should work just fine.
Two closest sizes were a 3mm, worked but didn't cut very deep.
Second was a 4-40 NC. This cut a much deeper thread and will probably be the one I go with.
Didn't seem to shrink the od meaning it wasn't too small of a die, and it fits nicely in a 3/32 drill hole. I can't yank it back out by hand. The one i cut 3mm was the same, but I feel this one will leave more area for the glue to bind in the threads.
4-40NC on the left 3mm on the right.

I just made a note to get the 4-40 NC for myself! (y) (y) (y)

My old 3/32nds cut just a little deeper than the other one you tried, but as you said, they ain't being pulled out once screwed and glued into place.

Thanks...
 

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I just made a note to get the 4-40 NC for myself! (y) (y) (y)

My old 3/32nds cut just a little deeper than the other one you tried, but as you said, they ain't being pulled out once screwed and glued into place.

Thanks...
Welcome!
Just measured the OD of the threads with a pair of calipers here. Both came out at .097"
 

yellowhand

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Not to clutter your thread, but want to say, "nice work Paul!" :)

Artistry in action...and with practical end use too, unlike some "art."

Thank you.

But, it ain't just "my" thread,,,I wish everyone doing this type work would post up their projects here, its how we all learn new stuff.

Just found another set of beat to death laminate hand guards, once I'm out from under work now, will use them to post up how to re-laminate them, replace the heat shields, which is all kinda tricky to do, did post it up before a few years ago, but can't locate it now, and lost my original photos. Same thing for how to "fix" the death cracks on duck bill FN pistol grips, once I get another in to fix, will post the how to up here.

With Mike @Invictus77 making this a sticky, now, this is all permanent.
 
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TerryN

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I wonder if there would be any advantage to cutting up aluminum tubing and epoxying it in place to reinforce the inside front end of the HG. Or, in taking flat aluminum stock and bending it to fit and then epoxying it in place. It would presumably provide a stronger repair, if that's even necessary.
 

yellowhand

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I wonder if there would be any advantage to cutting up aluminum tubing and epoxying it in place to reinforce the inside front end of the HG. Or, in taking flat aluminum stock and bending it to fit and then epoxying it in place. It would presumably provide a stronger repair, if that's even necessary.

I don't know, always used wood to reinforce wood.

The recoil tube channel up front that often breaks/cracks, is an easy fix with wood, metal to wood, might be transferring heat to the glue joint??? but I really don't know, never tried it.

I know this below works real good, makes a nice solid joining of the wood, easy to work.

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I ground down the area pretty good to seat the new wood in it.
 

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Now to hide as much of the repair work as possible.

Guards are nice and solid now, test fit to rifle just fine, metal pieces up front a little off, so there will be a gap on top, a small one, but, salvaged and ready to report back to duty for another 50 years............

That one panel was really busted up good, cracks, long and short, missing wood, chip outs,now all fixed.
 

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Went for it this morning.
All and all I'd call it a success.
Had two slight issues.
First was when drilling the hole for the rod. In an attempt to combat the drill bit wanting to "walk" on the slop of the wood stock. I started each hol at a slight angle inwards towards the comb, then almost immediately straightend out.
Worked great on the first side, didn't quite catch it in time/ had a bit too much of angle the second time and accidentally poked through to the recoil tube hole.
Caught it quickly thankfully and backed it and restarted and got it nice and straight! Put a bit glue from the inside on the hole just to be safe.

Second slight issue I had was when inserting the brass rod with the drill it had a tendency to back out a bit when I tried releasing it from the chuck. How do you combat this @yellowhand ?
I just twisted them back in with pliers afterwards.

Will let the glue do its thing for 24hrs. Then nip and dress the ends.
All and all I'm satisfied, should hold better then before I imagine.
Thanks for all the tips!

Thats just wood chips stuck in the, no visible brass.
 

yellowhand

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That's a great job, well done!!! (y) (y) (y) (y)

When I do these, I place an old bath towel on the bench, screw in the threaded rod, and when I get it where I want, reverse the drill direction, use my off hand, to grab the chuck, then hit the trigger, chuck releases the bit, and the work lands onto the folded up bath towel.

I nip off the ends, as soon as the drill is released and hit the nubs with my dremel sanding drum, then toss aside for 24 hours............

When you sand down the nubs, follow the contour of the wood, should look neat and clean when done.

Remove the brass rod nubs, leaving the wood as is.

Final finish smooth by hand sanding.

You can also go up from the bottom of these and then when done, no brass rod ends seen, if you can reach and pass the cracks with ya drill bit.

I've been known to make an entry hole in the tang screw recess location, but I have small diameter bits, sanding drums, to smooth the nubs to the surface of the wood.

A little blow out into the recoil tube location is normal for this operation, if the lower won't fit, a few strokes with a round file, all is then good to go.

Well done Sir!
 

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That's a great job, well done!!! (y) (y) (y) (y)

When I do these, I place an old bath towel on the bench, screw in the threaded rod, and when I get it where I want, reverse the drill direction, use my off hand, to grab the chuck, then hit the trigger, chuck releases the bit, and the work lands onto the folded up bath towel.

I nip off the ends, as soon as the drill is released and hit the nubs with my dremel sanding drum, then toss aside for 24 hours............

When you sand down the nubs, follow the contour of the wood, should look neat and clean when done.

Remove the brass rod nubs, leaving the wood as is.

Final finish smooth by hand sanding.

You can also go up from the bottom of these and then when done, no brass rod ends seen, if you can reach and pass the cracks with ya drill bit.

I've been known to make an entry hole in the tang screw recess location, but I have small diameter bits, sanding drums, to smooth the nubs to the surface of the wood.

A little blow out into the recoil tube location is normal for this operation, if the lower won't fit, a few strokes with a round file, all is then good to go.

Well done Sir!
Appreciate the kind words!!
Yea I will have to get a feel for it better on the drill chuck. I held it firmly but it still seemed to loosen them about a half turn or so.
So you nip the brass immediately?
I was worried about disturbing them so I left them for now. I imagine it doesn't make a ton of difference?

Thank you for sharing your knowledge with the rest of us!
 

yellowhand

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Appreciate the kind words!!
Yea I will have to get a feel for it better on the drill chuck. I held it firmly but it still seemed to loosen them about a half turn or so.
So you nip the brass immediately?
I was worried about disturbing them so I left them for now. I imagine it doesn't make a ton of difference?

Thank you for sharing your knowledge with the rest of us!
Yep, as soon as the drill comes off, then wipe the excess glue off the wood with a damp rag, and ground down the nubs, bang, bang, bang, done!

Happy to help..........
 

Bowpoopers

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Yes and have sold two here. I’m struggling on what butt plate to cut in. I have a short threat here as first furniture set. The stock in that got recontoured after those pics however. I lost the pics I had the only ones I know of are here.
 

yellowhand

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Yes and have sold two here. I’m struggling on what butt plate to cut in. I have a short threat here as first furniture set. The stock in that got recontoured after those pics however. I lost the pics I had the only ones I know of are here.

This is a "how to" thread.

When you do the next one, post up detailed pictures how ya do it step by step.

I saw the other thread, with your completed ones, nice.

I have a stock duplicator, but it won't ever be seeing the light of day ever again, not enough hours in the day any more for that work.

Best left to you and Flypaper.
 
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