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Updated 7/15/24 (new stuff) From the Bench,,,,,,,,,,(How to) all in one running thread/

lew

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Just an update on the Indians and also a warning,,,,when you're looking at a deadline,,,,to mail stuff home, like tomorrow,,,,,,don't use a new type product yesterday, and then be surprised today, when the stuff did not play well with your other stuff already on the piece,,,,,,as in,,,,what I used for touch up, did not dry in 36 hours,,,so off it came and back to the regular old stand by's.:)LOL

An orderly, neat, and well organized shipping department!

An understanding wife is a must. View attachment 347255 View attachment 347257 View attachment 347258
My Teutonic portion is having a panic attack looking at that mess. Ordnung über alles!
 

yellowhand

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Here below is a simple little repair, takes about an hour, chipped out top of the nose behind where the ferrule fits, and no refinish on the whole stock, owner wanted it fixed, but original finish left intact.

I used a half inch sanding drum, to clean it up, then a 5/8th dowel rod glued down in place, once dry, rough shaped it, and after doing that, noticed that one side was cut a little smaller that the other, happens,,so added another piece of walnut to build it up, then final shaped it. I used popular to fill the bulk of the repair, because it takes both glue and color well when final matching the original finish.

When doing the final finishing of the repair area, mix your oil with dye, get the color your looking for, apply with a tiny little brush, blending with your fingers.
The top area, repair area, and the back of the up slope of the butt, were both darker than the stock body, which made the final color and oiling far easier, darker areas far easier to hide than lighter ones.

The finish photos, has the oil and dye still wet, will dry overnight, a touch with some steel wood after it dries, about disappeared and your all done............

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Forgot to add to the above,,,,,once you get your repair wood down, and shaded to final shape,,,,,I go around ALL of the edges, where donor wood mates up with original using "Burn In" polymer to seal the edges. No matter how tight you get your glue join, when you go to color and oil, some of the oil will find a way into the joint, using burn in, prevents that. Wood joints and oil do not play well together going forward.
 

yellowhand

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Got some interesting stuff in and onto the cleaning and stripping bench, a busted SKS stock at the wrist and an odd duck, a FN butt, a nice one, that someone cut a swing swivel in the left side on it and then filled with wood putty.

Just got a load stripped down, cleaned, now ready for repair work later this week.

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The FN butt with the putty, you can just make out the tiny round bit I use in my dremel, to carefully remove the putty.
Will fill the hole up close ( to within an 1/8 of an inch) to the surface level with wood, then will strip down new wood on top of that, fitting each piece, about an 1/8 of an inch wide, sand down flush and finish the repair normally.

The SKS stock, first off is covered in "trench art", never seen a rifle stock so carved upon ever, and the owner wants it saved, so,,,,,,,only need to clean the hell out of it, done, and fix the broken wrist, which has several large ass cracks, one down the middle line and the right side wrist, about busted out as well.

Center line cracks in this location, needs wood dowels ran across the cracks to hold up to recoil, and this one also requires a lot of threaded brass rods, inside and outside to hold it all together under recoil.

I'll use 1/4 inch walnut dowels, across the main line cracks, and then threaded rod for interior cracks, etc.

Hard to see, but I used wooden wedges to pry open the cracks, and then flooded them with stripper,,,and then got all the crap out of them, oily wood will not accept glue!

Get all the cracks cleaned out, then glue up all the cracks,and clamp the hell out of them, leaving to sit for at least 24 hours, these will sit for at least 48, since they are through and throughs, top to bottom,,,,,to allow the glue to cure fully.

Once ya get it back and solid, begin drilling where you want dowels to go.
One in from each side.

Add a little color, hide the repairs, and then oil up and send home.

These can be fixed, and made shoot-able, just time and attention, and proper placement of the rods and dowels to suck up the recoil forces.

I'll detail out the actual repairs on these as I complete them.

If anyone has questions, this is the time and place to ask them.....
 

yellowhand

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Got the SKS back together,,,,now the owner wants to shoot it, and also for it to look like its been there and done that, and with that bad center line cracks, and the blow out on the sides, and the splits inside,,,,,,,well,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,it has taken a ton of threaded brass rods, as well as a major cross through dowel.

Every location you see a brass head, is going cross a crack!
There were a lot of cracks.:)LOL

Test fit everything with one of my SKS actions, its straight, fit fine.

The old Winchester stock, heel replacement, and that concave butt plate, ugh, had a large ass wood block on it, now rough down to where I can finish it by hand the rest of the way.

The FN stock, got the putty out of it, and laid in a hand fitted plywood piece, bringing it up to just below surface area. The installation of the swing swivel blew through to the recoil tube hole on close inspection, so pegged those with dowels, right through the plywood base plate. Any hole that goes into the recoil tube hole, got to fill them with wood, left as is, weakens the stock.
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yellowhand

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Can't believe it, hardly ever happens, but all projects are going well above! :ROFLMAO:

Everything is under initial color and oil, finishing photos tomorrow, touch up and "window dressing" hiding the repairs is going to take a while, apply color and oil, blend it, let dry, do it all over again the next day, until the bell rings, and its all done.
 

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Update on the above 11/24/23


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These pictures, the repair areas were all "wet" and when they dry, will about disappear.
If a little too shiny, just lightly hit with extra fine steel wool, then top coat the whole piece, to blend and hide and everything.
The SKS stock, will hide the rod heads, simple, a little black, and with with some many stray black marks on the stock, they will hide well, it just got its first coat of oil, so, blend between coats, will be fine, and it was not a "complete" refinish, was asked to leave all the trench art, beats and bangs, just fix it so it can be shot, and a light do over, leaving the been there and done that looks, which it will have!:)LOL
The Winchester stock, just about got it, a little more touch up between coats, and once all done, knock down the shine with a little light steel wood.
Was asked to save the original finish, so not everything taken down with it, leaving marks here and there.

For the FN stock with the large hole in the side, where someone added a swing swivel, touch up on it, a few minutes a day, left to dry for a day, then do it again, and again, until the repair area disappears.

I use the "three foot" gauge with these, if I stand back about three feet, and can't tell it's been repaired, its good to go.

You can't make any major wood repair 100% perfect, it is a repair after all, so, blend and blend, then call it, good enough!;)
 
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yellowhand

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Is that a Chinese SKS stock? Some of the wood the chicom's used was a special kind of craptastic. It's probably stronger than new with all those dowels and brass rods in it.

Excellent work!
I believe so, but not sure.

The main goal, make it shoot-able,,,,and center-line splits, cracks, ugh, ya got to go whole hog on'em.

Actually now that I've been making it "pretty" its starting to look pretty darn good.

I'll post up some completion photos later.......before sending it home.
 

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Its always a good day when stuff gets brought in to box up and send home.

The SKS stock, its back together, solid as it can be made, and all the "history" and "trench" art left in place.

The march of the FN/FAL grips, 8 of them, repaired and refinished.

The pictures of the placement of the threaded rods, to repair the duck bill cracks, normal for these is shown.
Once you get the cracks cleaned out, glued up, you run your threaded rod, both sides, just to the side of the pistol grip screw hole, and pop out right in the channel cut in the grip.
Drill your hole all the way through, glue up your threaded rod a little, I also force glue into the hole, take your finger on the end where the rod comes through, and screw the threaded rod in slowly, I chuck it in a small drill, and when you feel the end of the rod come through, stop.
You can't cut or trim the rod in this small space, so, don't drive it long.
 
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ByronF

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Had a cap put on a broken molar several weeks ago. We need some of their equipment. Would be sweet to take a 3D scan of a fracture plane, then use the digital model in a small milling machine to create the "negative" of the fracture plane into a block of walnut. Would give a seamless glue joint, and with an irregular junction to hide better and give more joint strength.
 

yellowhand

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Had a cap put on a broken molar several weeks ago. We need some of their equipment. Would be sweet to take a 3D scan of a fracture plane, then use the digital model in a small milling machine to create the "negative" of the fracture plane into a block of walnut. Would give a seamless glue joint, and with an irregular junction to hide better and give more joint strength.

I often use dental drill bits to sort out messes.
My doc saves the older ones for me.

I just finished up the Winchester stock above, with the heel replacement on that severe concave surface, will post up pictures later today when I bring it in to pack up and send home.

I probably "touched it" fifty times over two weeks, to fully blend the repair with the original finish, but she's done now, say with 98% of no evidence it was ever worked on.

The "saw tooth" pattern you're speaking about, has been around a long time for repairs, does a good job, and is a powerful joint, used for replacing front end pieces on long stocks.

I've got a roll of zig zag saw tooth printed tape out in the shop, wrap your stock end with it, cut the zig zag saw tooth pattern on a ban saw, then use the tape and cut the replacement wood with the same pattern, match up the patterns and glue it on, then shape the replacement wood.

Its a pain in the ass and time consuming to get perfectly matched, a computer directed cutter head would be great.
 

yellowhand

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This is an interesting How Too.

It is an original GI issue O3 stock and hand guards, a former drill rifle stock, which was ?? painted white???, with a good size chip out on top of the rear at the butt plate.

He asked me to repair the chip out, and remove the remaining white paint spots all over it, as well as match up the used/old hand guard panel, with the stock and other hand guard which under the paint, was damn near NOS.

Marking on the wrist, large P, what looks like an O and bottom side, 3 and a mark,,,not an expert on markings, with a very faint left side marking stamp.

Paint is a pain in the ass to completely remove from wood stocks, but it sure does protect stocks and wood like this.


So far;

Stripped it four times, then used a very fine pointed ice pick tool and even a large sharp safety pin, to gently removed the embedded paint out of the pours and deeper grain of the stock. Ya remove the paint, not the wood, and after stripping several times, it pops out. Went back over the whole stock, with my magnifying glasses on,,,and got the last tiny white spots out.

Just takes a little time and attention.

Next up, next session on it, fix the chip out, there is one or two little bumps that need attention, and also, up front, one of the thin pieces of wood, that fit under the larger metal hand guard keeper, needs to be addressed, a little wood added, etc....

The older darker hand guard panel, got it stripped down, will need to be bleached to get it back to the near new condition of the stock and other hand guard.

Pictures, from unboxing to stripped down completely
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It takes a smart man to locate anything in a cluttered shop and the mama coyote comes by most days to to clean up table scraps mama throws out over the front fence.:)LOL
 

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yellowhand

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That poor little puppy just wants to be let inside, you heartless bastard.

Yep, oh hell no, them things got teeth!:)LOL

The pair that comes up to eat scraps thrown over the fence, sometimes can get a photo or two of them, but yotes in general are wily little critters, take off full speed at any sign of anything.

Been so dry here for past year, now we got deer coming down, and been seeing several, which means, the bears and mountain lions are not far behind.

Bears, lions, deer, javalina, yotes, and illegal aliens, we got it all here now. ;)
 

ByronF

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YH,

How do you deal with a tight crack that cannot be opened? In this case the thin wall along the side has a crack that (so far) ends as soon as the wood becomes substantial again. Once the stock is well-fitted, maybe even epoxy bedded, and kept tight I suspect it'll never progress.

However, is there a way to fix it so I can be sure of it?

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yellowhand

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YH,

How do you deal with a tight crack that cannot be opened? In this case the thin wall along the side has a crack that (so far) ends as soon as the wood becomes substantial again. Once the stock is well-fitted, maybe even epoxy bedded, and kept tight I suspect it'll never progress.

However, is there a way to fix it so I can be sure of it?

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On these areas, cracks run front to rear, thin areas into thicker ones.

Glue up the actual crack, then back off into the thicker area say half an inch, 3/4, one inch?? and run a threaded brass rod up from the bottom, hiding the head below eye level, and across where the crack would normally run to when it finally progresses.

When you can't reinforce the thin crack itself, not enough material, you reinforce where the crack is going to run to, which keeps it from opening up.

I don't know how that butt fits the action, but can you "add" wood where its so thin on the inside and out of sight?
Even thin pieces of wood, acts like plywood when added, and makes the thin areas so much stronger.

Nice top repair, adding and reshaping the wood........
 

yellowhand

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Finished off the 1917 stock and guard.

It was covered in white paint spots deep down in the pours, one hand guard old and near black, and damage on the rear top, a pretty good crack/chip missing, and the top tang inlet area, all chipped and broken.

Paint all gone, good match on stock and guards, repairs all made.

It's nearly impossible to hide these type repairs, and the old chip out areas darken over the years/
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decades, so, just blended the area, to a natural looking stock discoloration.
 
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