• WTB / WTS / WTT ADS
    All Advertisements, including Want to Buy, Want to Sell, Want to Trade, Belong in the MARKETPLACE ONLY. Any new threads posted offering an item for sale, looking to trade or buy an item which are posted outside of Marketplace will be deleted without notice or warning. Existing threads will be moved to marketplace.
  • Marketplace Feedback Ratings
    The Marketplace feedback ratings system is now back. You can now leave feedback for your Buy / Sell / Trade transactions. Instructions on how to leave feedback ratings can be found HERE

Updated 6/13/24 (new stuff) From the Bench,,,,,,,,,,(How to) all in one running thread/

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
3/11/2024 update

Tops busted on FN stocks, normal

Hand guard repairs

@Flypaper wood set,,,,luv me some Dean wood!(y)(y)(y)
Had to adjust color a little after this picture, reason I take them.

A nice early, all marked up 03 stock, so early, no cross bolt, they used brass rods instead across the connection points, had the center line crack, behind the receiver, and was pretty much black,,,,now that lovely deep north American walnut with the reddish tint. Took some brass threaded rod and huge ass clamp to close the crack.
001.JPG
002.JPG
003.JPG
004.JPG
005.JPG
010.JPG
012.JPG
013.JPG
016.JPG
017.JPG
018.JPG
021.JPG
022.JPG
023.JPG
026.JPG
027.JPG
031.JPG
033.JPG
034.JPG
035.JPG
028.JPG
028.JPG
024.JPG
020.JPG
014.JPG
006.JPG
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
That one FN type stock, with busted off top piece, old glue job, but, they also ran wood dowels, about an 1/8th of inch in diameter in from the front and glued them in place along the cracks on both sides.

Had never see that done before.

Wood ACROSS cracks works, threaded brass rod better, smaller entry hole, but along with the cracks, well, the stock broke again, so, nope.

When I opened up the cracks, was surprised to see dowels there, a first.

So, cleaned out all of the old glue, the one dowel popped right out, the other nice and tight so left it in place.

Once stock comes out of clamps, will need to drill out the dowels from the front, and install new ones, to fill the space, then run two 3/32 threaded rods in from the top, on the little shelf, down both sides of the recoil tube, to insure it does not open up again under recoil.

Since stock is walnut, will use 1/8th wood dowel rod, walnut, to insure the body of the large chip off is nice and secure, but, this will be ACROSS the cracks now sealed up tight.

Ya run your brass threaded rod, or roughed up dowels, across cracks, not running along with them.

I'll post more photos of the above after repairs are completed................
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
That one FN type stock, with busted off top piece, old glue job, but, they also ran wood dowels, about an 1/8th of inch in diameter in from the front and glued them in place along the cracks on both sides.

Had never see that done before.

Wood ACROSS cracks works, threaded brass rod better, smaller entry hole, but along with the cracks, well, the stock broke again, so, nope.

When I opened up the cracks, was surprised to see dowels there, a first.

So, cleaned out all of the old glue, the one dowel popped right out, the other nice and tight so left it in place.

Once stock comes out of clamps, will need to drill out the dowels from the front, and install new ones, to fill the space, then run two 3/32 threaded rods in from the top, on the little shelf, down both sides of the recoil tube, to insure it does not open up again under recoil.

Since stock is walnut, will use 1/8th wood dowel rod, walnut, to insure the body of the large chip off is nice and secure, but, this will be ACROSS the cracks now sealed up tight.

Ya run your brass threaded rod, or roughed up dowels, across cracks, not running along with them.

I'll post more photos of the above after repairs are completed................
That is quite a neat attempt at repair on that fn stock.
I recently, still am, cleaning up and oiling and l1a1 stock. I noticed once stripped that mine is cracked all around on top as well and was reglued back down.
Will you use threaded rod after the glue drys on yours?
Was curious how one would go about repairing it as obviously you can go down the middle due to recoil tube.
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
That is quite a neat attempt at repair on that fn stock.
I recently, still am, cleaning up and oiling and l1a1 stock. I noticed once stripped that mine is cracked all around on top as well and was reglued back down.
Will you use threaded rod after the glue drys on yours?
Was curious how one would go about repairing it as obviously you can't go down the middle due to recoil tube.
With cracks like these, you actually go straight down beside the recoil tube from the top!

I'll drop two threaded rods way up front, entry holes on the little "shelf" angled down along side the recoil tube hole, and on this one, about an inch below the crack.

You have on these, just enough room for a 3/32nd threaded rod, just enough to slip pass the recoil tube hole down the sides. Once mounted to the lower, the shelf slips under the rear sight, out of sight, the entry points.

On an L1A1, you do the same thing, back off about a 1/4 inch, drop your pilot holes straight down from the top, alongside the recoil tube hole. running your threaded rod about 3/4 to 1 inch below the crack for good solid purchase.

Nip off the excess rod, allow the glue to dry, you glue up the threaded rod before screwing it into the wood, then come back later and carefully sand down the nubs protruding from the wood. Threaded brass rod will sand down with a dremel high speed sanding drum and 60 grit paper quickly. Get it close, finish off smooth with regular sand paper.

Area up front is tight, not much room, if you just "nick" the recoil tube hole when screwing in the rod, no worries, a small round file, will clean it up so you can install the stock over the recoil tube.

Drilling the pilot holes, go slow, make sure your angles are correct, a little nerve racking, :)LOL, no wiggle room.

These cracks start at the front, and run toward the rear of the stock, alongside the recoil tube, thin area for wood, so, ya got to stop it from ever happening again, by running the threaded brass rod as far forward as possible.

I'm not in the shop today, tomorrow, will pull everything out of the clamps, and drill these holes, run the rods on a couple of these, and will take pictures for you, to "see it done", in that my descriptions leaves a little out.

I'll try and remember to leave the rods on the outside, in their positions, snap a picture, so you can see their positions once installed.

On your L1A1 stock, done same way, the rod heads will show, but you can hide them with a little "finish work" as you finish the stock off.

On military stocks, they often they have threaded rod heads showing from past military arsenal repairs.

Since this one is broken off, I've got to also run rod, or dowels, back in the body of the cracked off pieces, to insure it holds together under recoil. I'll use wood vs rod, just to show here how wood is finished off vs rod. But, its done the same way, down alongside of the recoil tube hole.

You can use either for the body, up front, room only for threaded brass rod.
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
With cracks like these, you actually go straight down beside the recoil tube from the top!

I'll drop two threaded rods way up front, entry holes on the little "shelf" angled down along side the recoil tube hole, and on this one, about an inch below the crack.

You have on these, just enough room for a 3/32nd threaded rod, just enough to slip pass the recoil tube hole down the sides. Once mounted to the lower, the shelf slips under the rear sight, out of sight, the entry points.

On an L1A1, you do the same thing, back off about a 1/4 inch, drop your pilot holes straight down from the top, alongside the recoil tube hole. running your threaded rod about 3/4 to 1 inch below the crack for good solid purchase.

Nip off the excess rod, allow the glue to dry, you glue up the threaded rod before screwing it into the wood, then come back later and carefully sand down the nubs protruding from the wood. Threaded brass rod will sand down with a dremel high speed sanding drum and 60 grit paper quickly. Get it close, finish off smooth with regular sand paper.

Area up front is tight, not much room, if you just "nick" the recoil tube hole when screwing in the rod, no worries, a small round file, will clean it up so you can install the stock over the recoil tube.

Drilling the pilot holes, go slow, make sure your angles are correct, a little nerve racking, :)LOL, no wiggle room.

These cracks start at the front, and run toward the rear of the stock, alongside the recoil tube, thin area for wood, so, ya got to stop it from ever happening again, by running the threaded brass rod as far forward as possible.

I'm not in the shop today, tomorrow, will pull everything out of the clamps, and drill these holes, run the rods on a couple of these, and will take pictures for you, to "see it done", in that my descriptions leaves a little out.

I'll try and remember to leave the rods on the outside, in their positions, snap a picture, so you can see their positions once installed.

On your L1A1 stock, done same way, the rod heads will show, but you can hide them with a little "finish work" as you finish the stock off.

On military stocks, they often they have threaded rod heads showing from past military arsenal repairs.

Since this one is broken off, I've got to also run rod, or dowels, back in the body of the cracked off pieces, to insure it holds together under recoil. I'll use wood vs rod, just to show here how wood is finished off vs rod. But, its done the same way, down alongside of the recoil tube hole.

You can use either for the body, up front, room only for threaded brass rod.
Ok make sense. I wasn't sure if the sides by the recoil tube would be too thin to either fit anything or to do it without cracking. Sounds like it's very tight. But I worry about it breaking off again so I may have to give it a go.
Where do you get your threaded brass rod from?
And your glue of choice?
 
Last edited:

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Ok make sense. I wasn't sure if the sides by the recoil tube would be too thin to either fit anything or to do it without cracking. Sounds like it's very tight. But I worry about it breaking off again so I may have to give it a go.
Where do you get your threaded brass rod from?

I use 3/32 rod on these locations, get it from ACE, and then thread it here in the shop.
Drill a 3/32 pilot hole, and the threaded rod screws right in tight, with some glue on the threads.
I chuck the rod into a drill, got one with a slow speed controlled trigger, and just screw it in easy, without stripping the wood by going over tight.
Same thing for threading it,,,I use my drill, and just clamp the die in the metal vice and away I go.
If you can't thread it, don't have the equipment, drop me a PM and I'll send you a piece threaded in the mail...
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Ok make sense. I wasn't sure if the sides by the recoil tube would be too thin to either fit anything or to do it without cracking. Sounds like it's very tight. But I worry about it breaking off again so I may have to give it a go.
Where do you get your threaded brass rod from?

Got to do it to two tomorrow, will give ya pictures and more detail, after you see how, its pretty easy, like the skinny gal said, it will fit, tight, but it will fit!:)LOL
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
I use 3/32 rod on these locations, get it from ACE, and then thread it here in the shop.
Drill a 3/32 pilot hole, and the threaded rod screws right in tight, with some glue on the threads.
I chuck the rod into a drill, got one with a slow speed controlled trigger, and just screw it in easy, without stripping the wood by going over tight.
Same thing for threading it,,,I use my drill, and just clamp the die in the metal vice and away I go.
If you can't thread it, don't have the equipment, drop me a PM and I'll send you a piece threaded in the mail...
Sounds easy enough.
I'll try and locate some threaded if not I'll give you a shout, thank you for the offer!
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Much obliged as always!

Don't normally hit the shop on Tuesday or Saturday,,,,Temple on Tuesday(long ass day) and Sabbath Saturday, and as our holy man would say, I've been a bad, bad boy this past week!:)LOL

So here ya go, I slipped out this evening, mama went to her church, (y) and got this one done with pictures.

Everything we spoke about, but I also showed how and where to run rod in from the bottom, front top is most important, but the body was also broken back a ways behind the hump, so, doubled it for this.

Also, showed my secret weapon, that drill bit, threaded onto a turned down AK 47 barrel the exact diameter I need to clean out recoil tube holes a good friend made for me about a decade ago. One or two of these stocks broke as the owner took them off, damn thing were tight as all hell, and after gluing them up for the repairs, took several hand turns to clean them out so they'd fit the lower, snug, but not insanely tight.

002.JPG
003.JPG
004.JPG
008.JPG
009.JPG
010.JPG
011.JPG
012.JPG
014.JPG
016.JPG
018.JPG
020.JPG
022.JPG
023.JPG
013.JPG
019.JPG
007.JPG


I've got to finish these up, by fixing the chip outs where the hinge goes on the back end, common fix,,,but,,,that's tomorrow!

I missed anything, shout out, happy to help......
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Forgot, I left one of the clamps in place until I got the rods ran down from the top,,,,,took a lot of pressure to close the gap, no reason to take a chance it might pop open.

With the threaded rod in place, about zero chance of that happening, of course, there is always a first time.

I ground down the heads, nubs, with my dremel, all dremel work on firearms is not always bad, :)LOL, then finished off with a hand sander smooth and flush.
 

TerryN

Well-known member
FALaholic #
55
Joined
Jul 21, 2000
Posts
7,068
Location
Texas, USA
Feedback: 19 / 0 / 0
Sounds easy enough.
I'll try and locate some threaded if not I'll give you a shout, thank you for the offer!
Brownells carries the threaded pins but they must be gold plated, cuz they're mighty proud of them! I don't see any reason why you couldn't buy the appropriate size all-thread at the hardware store and cut it to length. It may not be as hard as the brass pins that Brownells sells, but it'll probably work.
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
Brownells carries the threaded pins but they must be gold plated, cuz they're mighty proud of them! I don't see any reason why you couldn't buy the appropriate size all-thread at the hardware store and cut it to length. It may not be as hard as the brass pins that Brownells sells, but it'll probably work.
Yea I saw them there was going to buy some for an sks stock that I ended up just sending to yellowhand.
Very pricey for what they are especially after shipping. I'm just going to make some like he said above.
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
Don't normally hit the shop on Tuesday or Saturday,,,,Temple on Tuesday(long ass day) and Sabbath Saturday, and as our holy man would say, I've been a bad, bad boy this past week!:)LOL

So here ya go, I slipped out this evening, mama went to her church, (y) and got this one done with pictures.

Everything we spoke about, but I also showed how and where to run rod in from the bottom, front top is most important, but the body was also broken back a ways behind the hump, so, doubled it for this.

Also, showed my secret weapon, that drill bit, threaded onto a turned down AK 47 barrel the exact diameter I need to clean out recoil tube holes a good friend made for me about a decade ago. One or two of these stocks broke as the owner took them off, damn thing were tight as all hell, and after gluing them up for the repairs, took several hand turns to clean them out so they'd fit the lower, snug, but not insanely tight.

View attachment 393031 View attachment 393032 View attachment 393033 View attachment 393034 View attachment 393035 View attachment 393036 View attachment 393037 View attachment 393038 View attachment 393039 View attachment 393040 View attachment 393041 View attachment 393042 View attachment 393043 View attachment 393044 View attachment 393045 View attachment 393046 View attachment 393047

I've got to finish these up, by fixing the chip outs where the hinge goes on the back end, common fix,,,but,,,that's tomorrow!

I missed anything, shout out, happy to help......
Awesome!! Thank you so much for this. It looks amazing as always, you're a wizard.
I will pick up some brass rod this weekend and give it a go sometime next week.
Doing it a little backwards as the stock is already in the oiling process. But seeing as it's not completely split and still glued in place I imagine I can cleanly enough just add the rods and touch up whatever need be afterwards. I will aim for just next to the raised hump of the stock and on the "wings" if that makes sense.
Is there any glue you're partial too or would any wood glue do the job?
This is not the stock I'm question, just using as an example of my thoughts.
Screenshot_20240313_074956_Gallery.jpg
 

TerryN

Well-known member
FALaholic #
55
Joined
Jul 21, 2000
Posts
7,068
Location
Texas, USA
Feedback: 19 / 0 / 0
Apparently, the guys who repair wooden musical instruments have stopped using brass pins to repair cracks due to mixed results. They now use carbon fiber rod, and report better results. Below is a link to a source, complete with instructions. Alternately, Amazon has sone threaded brass pins that should work. Brass machine screws from the hardware store will also work, IF you can find them small enough and long enough.

Carbon Fiber Rod

Amazon Brass Threaded Stock
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Awesome!! Thank you so much for this. It looks amazing as always, you're a wizard.
I will pick up some brass rod this weekend and give it a go sometime next week.
Doing it a little backwards as the stock is already in the oiling process. But seeing as it's not completely split and still glued in place I imagine I can cleanly enough just add the rods and touch up whatever need be afterwards. I will aim for just next to the raised hump of the stock and on the "wings" if that makes sense.
Is there any glue you're partial too or would any wood glue do the job?
This is not the stock I'm question, just using as an example of my thoughts.
View attachment 393116
It should, when you drill the pilot hole, you'll blow right through the top oil/stain/dye in a nano second and hit fresh wood for purchase of the threaded rod.
The only problem, maybe, is the glue up process.
The glue does the work, holding the wood together, think of the threaded brass rods as say steel straps/bands around a heavy wood crate?????
The rods just add to, this sucker ain't coming loose again without a fight. ;)
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
It should, when you drill the pilot hole, you'll blow right through the top oil/stain/dye in a nano second and hit fresh wood for purchase of the threaded rod.
The only problem, maybe, is the glue up process.
The glue does the work, holding the wood together, think of the threaded brass rods as say steel straps/bands around a heavy wood crate?????
The rods just add to, this sucker ain't coming loose again without a fight. ;)
Sounds good. I will drill the pilot, then coat the rod in the glue, then send her home and hope for the best!
Will report back!
Thank you again!
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Brownells carries the threaded pins but they must be gold plated, cuz they're mighty proud of them! I don't see any reason why you couldn't buy the appropriate size all-thread at the hardware store and cut it to length. It may not be as hard as the brass pins that Brownells sells, but it'll probably work.
Apparently, the guys who repair wooden musical instruments have stopped using brass pins to repair cracks due to mixed results. They now use carbon fiber rod, and report better results. Below is a link to a source, complete with instructions. Alternately, Amazon has sone threaded brass pins that should work. Brass machine screws from the hardware store will also work, IF you can find them small enough and long enough.

Carbon Fiber Rod

Amazon Brass Threaded Stock


I buy some stuff from Brownell's but also pass by a lot of common stuff they sell because of the insane prices they have on'em.

You can "work" brass rods with simple files, me, I use a sanding drum, 1/2 inch attached to my dremel tool, and it just takes down the nubs faster than the time it takes to write this sentence here.

I use the hand nippers, no idea what the tool is called officially, to snip off excess rod, that which chucks in the drill to spin them into the wood.
We use a much larger version to trim horses hooves, always just called them nippers.
Any side cutter pliers would work.

I've never heard of using carbon fiber for this type work before now.
Something new.

Ace hard ware sells 1 foot long pieces of 3/32 brass rod, for a 1.29,,,and I believe there are two pieces in this package, so, two foot for 1.29
I buy it in three foot sections, cheap, from ACE, forget exactly how much, because I use so much of it.


The 3/32'nd die I use, the one in the picture, maybe 2 bucks, from HF and its been going strong for over a decade with countless threaded brass rods, and a shot of Remington oil.

Glue used by me,,,,,,,Titebond IIII, its water proof, excess wipes off with a damp rag and is easy to work, to get off surfaces so as to not effect dye and oil finishes, and it pretty cheap, couple of bucks.

Clamps, I got big ones, small ones, cheap price ones, expensive ones, and about everything in between.:)LOL

Been known to use badge clips, which I ground down the "teeth" on, for tiny delicate work.

Metal working, down to 10/1000's,,,,,,wood work, tape measure is good to go.

Folks like to complicate stuff in this old world, and also get into your wallet.

Cracks are easy, clean'em out, glue them up tight, and add threaded brass rod in high stress areas for added strength.

Holes, fill'em, with wood, other "stuff", sand and finish.

Missing wood,,,,,,,,,add more wood, get rid of everything not needed, color and oil.

The only real "truth" in wood working, glue don't work/stick to dirty, rotted, wet, covered wood.
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
I buy some stuff from Brownell's but also pass by a lot of common stuff they sell because of the insane prices they have on'em.

You can "work" brass rods with simple files, me, I use a sanding drum, 1/2 inch attached to my dremel tool, and it just takes down the nubs faster than the time it takes to write this sentence here.

I use the hand nippers, no idea what the tool is called officially, to snip off excess rod, that which chucks in the drill to spin them into the wood.
We use a much larger version to trim horses hooves, always just called them nippers.
Any side cutter pliers would work.

I've never heard of using carbon fiber for this type work before now.
Something new.

Ace hard ware sells 1 foot long pieces of 3/32 brass rod, for a 1.29,,,and I believe there are two pieces in this package, so, two foot for 1.29
I buy it in three foot sections, cheap, from ACE, forget exactly how much, because I use so much of it.


The 3/32'nd die I use, the one in the picture, maybe 2 bucks, from HF and its been going strong for over a decade with countless threaded brass rods, and a shot of Remington oil.

Glue used by me,,,,,,,Titebond IIII, its water proof, excess wipes off with a damp rag and is easy to work, to get off surfaces so as to not effect dye and oil finishes, and it pretty cheap, couple of bucks.

Clamps, I got big ones, small ones, cheap price ones, expensive ones, and about everything in between.:)LOL

Been known to use badge clips, which I ground down the "teeth" on, for tiny delicate work.

Metal working, down to 10/1000's,,,,,,wood work, tape measure is good to go.

Folks like to complicate stuff in this old world, and also get into your wallet.

Cracks are easy, clean'em out, glue them up tight, and add threaded brass rod in high stress areas for added strength.

Holes, fill'em, with wood, other "stuff", sand and finish.

Missing wood,,,,,,,,,add more wood, get rid of everything not needed, color and oil.

The only real "truth" in wood working, glue don't work/stick to dirty, rotted, wet, covered wood.
Excellent info. Will be going on a shopping trip to get everything this weekend. Ace for the rod, hopefully the glue too if not home depot then harbor freight for the die. Can't seem to find a 3/32 at our shop. Thanks!
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Excellent info. Will be going on a shopping trip to get everything this weekend. Ace for the rod, hopefully the glue too if not home depot then harbor freight for the die. Can't seem to find a 3/32 at our shop. Thanks!
I had a large expensive set of tap and dies, but alas, they disappeared one day about/around the time my now retired Marine son departed for yet another combat deployment after stopping by to say hello/hi.

He came home OK, but, I never saw the tap and die set again.

Might be connected, his coming and going, and my missing tap and die set?:unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::whistle::whistle:

HF sells that little green case set of tap and dies cheap, 15 bucks or so.

Might have individuals, been a while since I wondered around our store here.

I'm sure Titebond III is everywhere.
 

BrunoN

Well-known member
Contributor
FALaholic #
83550
Joined
Dec 28, 2019
Posts
610
Location
Boston, Massachusetts
Feedback: 38 / 0 / 0
I had a large expensive set of tap and dies, but alas, they disappeared one day about/around the time my now retired Marine son departed for yet another combat deployment after stopping by to say hello/hi.

He came home OK, but, I never saw the tap and die set again.

Might be connected, his coming and going, and my missing tap and die set?:unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::whistle::whistle:

HF sells that little green case set of tap and dies cheap, 15 bucks or so.

Might have individuals, been a while since I wondered around our store here.

I'm sure Titebond III is everywhere.
Haha quite the "coincidence"
I'll look for an individual, if not get a cheap set. And lastly just use one here that's close enough if that doesn't work.
 

yellowhand

Well-known member
Silver Contributor
FALaholic #
67949
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Posts
36,486
Location
Sierra Vista AZ
Feedback: 265 / 0 / 0
Haha quite the "coincidence"
I'll look for an individual, if not get a cheap set. And lastly just use one here that's close enough if that doesn't work.

Threaded is best of course, but I've seen real old timers, take a piece of rod, and rough it up real good with pliers, side cutters, add glue and hammer'em home.
 
Top