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Updated 4/7/24 (new stuff) From the Bench,,,,,,,,,,(How to) all in one running thread/

Bowpoopers

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My tools are far more primitive than MR.flypaper. But I make it work. A full build thread. I am a many of many hats so time. Honestly the stock builds are what I do to relax when I can. Your work is amazing or inspiring
 

yellowhand

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My tools are far more primitive than MR.flypaper. But I make it work. A full build thread. I am a many of many hats so time. Honestly the stock builds are what I do to relax when I can. Your work is amazing or inspiring
Thank you.

Don't ever sell yourself short,,,,everyone starts some place, Dean/Flypaper started out slow himself, same for me.

Ya learn by doing.

Make mistakes, correct them next go around, learn something new, improve constantly.
 

BrunoN

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And that's a wrap! Learned alot along the way, now I know what to do a little differently next time. Can see on one side I got a bit too close to the comb and the threads put a little groove it. But no biggie, I don't mind it.
All and all very satisfied with the results, thank you very much @yellowhand for all the tips.
Last question, what are your thoughts on applying a dab of black paint on the brass heads to disguise them as dark marks in the stock?
Brass doesn't bother me really, but just a thought i had. I've seen Mark novak do it in a couple of his videos.
 

yellowhand

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That's how she is done! (y)

You can hide the heads several ways, or not at all.

One of the most simple,,,,,,after you oil over the work location, it dries, use a Sharpee black permanent marker and touch up with it. Let dry, then a top coat of oil, all done.
You've got the normal dark spots on the stock, so adding a couple more to "blend in" the rod heads, no problem.

The eye notices round, straight, and square anything in an otherwise natural background, so, all ya got to do, is break up the shape to make it "disappear", not be picked up by the eye as being out of "place" or not natural.

Since ya doing just one butt,,,,you can also, use a "smear technique", where as you place a little black sharpee color on your finger tip, and go over the area where you sanded the wood a little light in places. You don't want to go over all the light areas, then ya got a big black spot, just in small areas, to again, break up the color pattern that the eye "sees", if that makes sense,,,,,,never tried to explain it in printed words before.;)

Another method to hide heads, once ya get them to this level, use a tiny drill bit, and drill a slight dimple in the rod head, then cut a thin piece of wood, glue and clamp it down tight over the head, once dried, gently sand the area smooth, then color and oil, no more head showing.

On military grade wood, arsenals did not hide the heads when they repaired the wood.

I strip wood down completely (to the weathered grey), removing all old oils and finishes, when doing these type repairs, then when adding color back and oiling, can normally hide the heads by using oil and color mixed, after the first coat of oil goes over the stock/wood while final finishing.

Your first coat of oil goes on, dries, then you take a 3x5 index card, a drop of finish oil, and a little of the dye/color I used on the stock, mix, and go over the brass rod heads, let dry for 24, then go back to oiling normally. Its like painting a picture, I have a LOT of tiny little paint brushes on the finishing bench.:)LOL
All you're doing, is breaking up the "odd" shape on the surface that your eye sees.
You don't even have to cover the whole screw head, just remove the perfectly round shape, then the area blends right back into the back ground..................

Good job, well done amigo...(y)(y)(y)
 

yellowhand

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Just a side note, on metal jaw vices for wood work.

I've got wood working vices, but,,,,,,,,,,,,,have been known to have them all in use at same time, so, use my metal working vice from time to time.

Some scrap plywood, couple pieces of some hard wood, and you can make pieces that will drop down and cover the metal jaws of a metal working vise, to protect the wood finish on the pieces you're clamping up tight.

I sometimes need to use it, if whatever I'm gluing up, has the cracks spread wide and I need to extra force of the big ass metal working vise to be able to close the cracks up tight for gluing.
 

BrunoN

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Excellent tips as always!!
You've got the normal dark spots on the stock, so adding a couple more to "blend in" the rod heads, no problem.
This was exactly my thoughts.
Given that I already finished the wood for the most part, just need to do one more coat. I think I will go the sharpie technique then cover it with Mt final coat of oil.
I also had the idea of drilling it down more and covering it up but I feel that opens up some room for error for me. I want to end on a good note haha
Good idea on the smear technique. I've ran into that recently on some israeli handuards where one was lighter then the other. This would've been a good way to darken it a tad. I ended using candle soot that worked okay.

Thanks for the support!!
 

BrunoN

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Just a side note, on metal jaw vices for wood work.

I've got wood working vices, but,,,,,,,,,,,,,have been known to have them all in use at same time, so, use my metal working vice from time to time.

Some scrap plywood, couple pieces of some hard wood, and you can make pieces that will drop down and cover the metal jaws of a metal working vise, to protect the wood finish on the pieces you're clamping up tight.

I sometimes need to use it, if whatever I'm gluing up, has the cracks spread wide and I need to extra force of the big ass metal working vise to be able to close the cracks up tight for gluing.
I've seen similar before. I've been meaning to make a set for my home vice. This was at work so I just wrapped it in a few shop towels and only held it tighten enough where it wouldn't move easily.
 

yellowhand

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Excellent tips as always!!

This was exactly my thoughts.
Given that I already finished the wood for the most part, just need to do one more coat. I think I will go the sharpie technique then cover it with Mt final coat of oil.
I also had the idea of drilling it down more and covering it up but I feel that opens up some room for error for me. I want to end on a good note haha
Good idea on the smear technique. I've ran into that recently on some israeli handuards where one was lighter then the other. This would've been a good way to darken it a tad. I ended using candle soot that worked okay.

Thanks for the support!!

Sitting here drinking coffee before hitting the shop, and I have all that new wood added to the hand-guards to begin hiding as I finish them off.

Repairs are pretty straight forward, hiding the areas where you did the repairs, is the hard part.......... ;)
 

ByronF

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So there's room.

Great. Now, I'd like this to look like that FAL stock with all the fiddleback. Because I'm too cheap to buy respectable wood it goes without saying that my budget is shipping only. Thanks in advance. 17112322951601511322793.jpg
 

yellowhand

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So there's room.

Great. Now, I'd like this to look like that FAL stock with all the fiddleback. Because I'm too cheap to buy respectable wood it goes without saying that my budget is shipping only. Thanks in advance. View attachment 396500

Fiddleback would cost ya a dollar more.

Sure that won't break the bank?


What is that, an 870??? :unsure:

Never mind, silly question.;):ROFLMAO:
 

ByronF

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Fiddleback would cost ya a dollar more.

Sure that won't break the bank?


What is that, an 870??? :unsure:

Never mind, silly question.;):ROFLMAO:
So cock-sure of your assumptions.

It's an 1100. TURTLEY differnt. Probably actually a Sportsman 12 Auto, but until the USPS is finished with losing guns I may never know.
 

ByronF

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Well excuse me all tha hell,,,,,numbers,,,,,vs names,,,,,,that's a big 10/4, or a 10/20, oh never mind! ;)
So there I was... (the only appropriate intro to a submariner's story)... browsing Gunbroker. Up popped what is described as an 870 sportsman (There is no such thing), photo shows a Remington autoloader with the skinny cut behind CH cut, which can be only either an 1100, an 1100 Tactical, or a Sportsman 12 Auto (pre-Express era no-frills version of 1100).

I pay the $399, natch. But tracking is perpetually in "en route" status for a week past initial delivery estimate. But I've already eBayed me some hateful ugly lumber so It'll have wood front and rear.

Today I visit my receiving FFL. Wouldn't you know, he has a freshly received Sportman 12 Auto in near mint condition for $375. Well, that aggression will not stand, so it's mine, too.
 

yellowhand

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That's a good looking pile of lumber there, YH!

I was rather pleased with how the broken off top surplus stocks turned out,,,,I needed to put on my glasses and hold them just right to maybe tell where they were put all back together at.

And I did it.:)LOL
 

ByronF

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Could use some advice on stripping and bleaching. Have a decent forearm, a very ratty buttstock that needs repair. I'm guessing I need to bleach them both back to match then add back color? Is oxalic acid what I need to bleach?
 

yellowhand

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Could use some advice on stripping and bleaching. Have a decent forearm, a very ratty buttstock that needs repair. I'm guessing I need to bleach them both back to match then add back color? Is oxalic acid what I need to bleach?

Depends.

Start off by stripping both down to that grey colored stripped wood has when stripped, then hit them with some rubbing alcohol and see how close they are to one another in color.

If any where near close, no bleaching required, just adjust your color/dye on the pieces to match them to the naturally darker piece of the group.

You can buy wood bleach at Lowes/ACE, mix with a little boiling water, brush on with a 2 inch cheap throw away brush, allow to dry, out side, then hit them again with the solution, allow to dry, then rinse the hell out of the wood,,,,,,,but,,,,,,,,,,,,I've been just stripping the wood again with stripper, to remove all the bleach, which does not play well at all with final oiling.
If any of the bleach residue is left on the wood, it plays hell with the oiling process, and its easy to miss a small patch when just rinsing.

If you use the wood bleach granules, use about a third of the plastic bucket each time you use it and just enough water to make it a liquid!

People don't care for wood bleach, because they don't use enough of it, use enough, it works well.

On really badly stained wood, been known to use an old degraded jug of straight clorox painted on, wait ten minutes, rinse off, dry, repeat till its bleached out to what you want.

Don't allow it to be on wood for more than ten minutes, its damn hard on wood fibers, if left longer.

All bleaching of wood outside,,,,the witches brew, old finish, oil, dye, finish oil, and now bleach, ugh, not to be taken into your lungs!
 
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BrunoN

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And that's a wrap! Not nearly as nice as your work but I'm happy with them.
Been done for a little while now, just been curing.
Only "issue" I noticed is while the handguards have dried nicely, the buttstock seems dry but still has a bit of a tacky feel to it. Any way to fix that, or something to do differently next time?
Handguards are nice and smooth though, so maybe I was just a tad heavy on the final coat on the stock?
Regardless like I said very happy with it, especially the stock repair!
Appreciate all your help!
 

yellowhand

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And that's a wrap! Not nearly as nice as your work but I'm happy with them.
Been done for a little while now, just been curing.
Only "issue" I noticed is while the handguards have dried nicely, the buttstock seems dry but still has a bit of a tacky feel to it. Any way to fix that, or something to do differently next time?
Handguards are nice and smooth though, so maybe I was just a tad heavy on the final coat on the stock?
Regardless like I said very happy with it, especially the stock repair!
Appreciate all your help!

Ya getting there! (y)

A little "tacky" just sit the wood on a window shelf in direct sunlight for a few days, should take care of it.

You can use 4000 steel wool and lightly go over the wood and knock down the shine a little.

That butt stock saw some hard service in its life, like an old boxer showing the scars from a lifetime in the ring.

With those black marks, from dents, if anyone does not care to raise or sand them, many don't, you can get rid of them, mostly, by simply bleaching the wood after stripping a couple of times.

Well done, now all nice and solid, ready for use!
 

BrunoN

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Ya getting there! (y)

A little "tacky" just sit the wood on a window shelf in direct sunlight for a few days, should take care of it.

You can use 4000 steel wool and lightly go over the wood and knock down the shine a little.

That butt stock saw some hard service in its life, like an old boxer showing the scars from a lifetime in the ring.

With those black marks, from dents, if anyone does not care to raise or sand them, many don't, you can get rid of them, mostly, by simply bleaching the wood after stripping a couple of times.

Well done, now all nice and solid, ready for use!
Awesome, easy enough will do!

Good to know on the marks as well, I like the character of it so I left them.
Just waiting in a grip from a member here and I'll get everything mounted up, very excited for that!
 

yellowhand

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Another day, another adventure in the shop.

Got in what I'm calling damn near a "blank" not fully finished,shaped and with holes, recoil, hand guard screw placement cut off center, same for grip,etc.

Had to re-cut/drill out the recoil tube hole, center up and re-cut the butt plate fitment, same for tang screw cut out, and of course fitting to the test lower.

Hand guards, had one left side metal escrutian in place, small/tiny actually, out it came and in went a proper sized one on both sides. Of course the hand guard screw hole were off center to mount to the rifle, so, hand guard was not cut properly to fit front back, etc, recoil tube hole cuts, barrel fitment, so all that got taken care of.

Wood is beautiful, beach, just never fully finished/fitted etc.

When you're doing something like this, with multiple problems, pick one, fix it, move on to the next and then the next problem, and pretty soon, it fits properly.

Hand guards still have flat cuts on them, so now that they are fitted to the test rifle, one of mine, can now raise a dust storm and get the outside in proper shape and contour.
Same for butt, which is "fat" and pistol grip.

Rest of the photos, how I do cleaning and stripping,,,,,and what I use. 007.JPG 008.JPG 011.JPG 012.JPG 017.JPG 018.JPG 020.JPG 021.JPG 022.JPG 023.JPG 024.JPG 025.JPG 026.JPG 027.JPG 028.JPG 029.JPG 030.JPG 031.JPG 033.JPG 038.JPG 039.JPG
 

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It really sucks when the guy that started out butchering the wood drilled his holes in the wrong spot! Fortunately, you can 'erase' holes in wood pretty easily (usually). What I really hate is when someone gets the primary locating hole wrong in metal - a receiver, or something! They're a lot more difficult to correct, if it's even possible. I never tried wood bleach, but I have used (and do NOT recommend) chlorine bleach - Clorox or similar. Same thing with oven cleaner - that's bad juju for wood!
 

yellowhand

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It really sucks when the guy that started out butchering the wood drilled his holes in the wrong spot! Fortunately, you can 'erase' holes in wood pretty easily (usually). What I really hate is when someone gets the primary locating hole wrong in metal - a receiver, or something! They're a lot more difficult to correct, if it's even possible. I never tried wood bleach, but I have used (and do NOT recommend) chlorine bleach - Clorox or similar. Same thing with oven cleaner - that's bad juju for wood!

I'd never seen a set like this sold before,,,but,,,,,it will be fine when done, the wood is a really near perfect match among the pieces.

I leave all my builds and major repair work to people like Gunplumber, who built all my fals.

Correcting stuff like this in this wood pile, all I really do metal wise.

Oven cleaner is the worse, what I use to strip wood does play well with oven cleaner, about choked myself a couple times, now I smell wood to make sure, no oven cleaner before stripping.

House hold bleach degrades over time, I have a really old jug, and used properly and quickly, can do certain things with wood better than anything else, but mostly, best to avoid it on wood and just use regular wood bleach.

This is a photo below of how badly these were never finished properly for fit.

1712456731650.jpeg
 
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