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The Space Cowboy Revolver Carbine

Bubacus

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Interesting find in an Austrian gunshop. Would be a movie prop for a number of post apocalyptic films most likely.. Cue the Steve Miller Band:


The SPACE COWBOY Revolver Carbine! (By Austria Arms & Alfa Proj)

In this episode of TFBTV, James Reeves is in Austria visiting the world-renowned gun store, Austria Arms to have a look at their “Space Cowboy” revolver carbine. Although it doesn’t have an official title yet, everyone has taken to calling this the “Space Cowboy” for obvious reasons. Despite being a traditional revolver (made by Alfa Proj), this carbine adopts a futuristic, tactical style with its appearance and features. It includes a full-length M-LOK handguard with continuous optic rail, a skeletonized buttstock with cheek riser, enlarged controls, a muzzle brake, and more. Essentially, this clever design was created as a workaround for European gun laws – depending on the country, the Space Cowboy may be a relatively easy-to-purchase and license firearm because it is, indeed, a revolver. However, you still get nearly all of the benefits of a powerful semi-auto carbine – other than capacity, of course. James walks you through this interesting design.
 

LYCAN

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Cylinder gap is the Achilles Heel of this design. You are likely to only require learning that lesson once, and your off-hand forearm may even bear a reminder for you for years to come, in the right calibers of course. To each his own I guess.

View attachment 386987
I remember when the S&W .500 Mag first came out, some dude didn't have grip discipline - lost a about half a pea - chunck of flesh off his thumb. I
Some gnarly pics.

Getting to the point, yes - that's a valid issue many don't consider - when dealing with high pressure firearms
 

ByronF

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Cylinder gap is the Achilles Heel of this design. You are likely to only require learning that lesson once, and your off-hand forearm may even bear a reminder for you for years to come, in the right calibers of course. To each his own I guess.

View attachment 386987
Super cereal. That's a perfect excuse for saddle leather thick forearm cuffs to complement your... well, your.... errybody knows.

ASSLESSSS CHAPSESESSSSSS
 

brownknees

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Rifles weren't held in the same fashion back then as they are today!
That also explains the deeply curved butt plates & fancy extended rear trigger guards on period examples & accurate reproductions.
the butt-plate was held against the bicep of the strong hand & the weak hand held the small of the stock! Both well away from the flash gap.
1711318016766.png
 

Tuhlmann

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Rifles weren't held in the same fashion back then as they are today!
That also explains the deeply curved butt plates & fancy extended rear trigger guards on period examples & accurate reproductions.
the butt-plate was held against the bicep of the strong hand & the weak hand held the small of the stock! Both well away from the flash gap.
View attachment 396831
I’ve never seen a single example in literature, military text, or art that supports or even suggests that is true. On top of that, the design was never much more than a novelty anyways, from what I’ve seen. If you have some examples showing different I’d sure be interested to see them.
 

Wildcat

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Rifles weren't held in the same fashion back then as they are today!
That also explains the deeply curved butt plates & fancy extended rear trigger guards on period examples & accurate reproductions.
the butt-plate was held against the bicep of the strong hand & the weak hand held the small of the stock! Both well away from the flash gap.
View attachment 396831
The big concern about moving the support hand ahead of the cylinder on those guns is....what happens if you get a chainfire.
Potentially having extra bullets launched down either side of the barrel (or both sides) means: don't put your hand out there.
 

brownknees

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I’ve never seen a single example in literature, military text, or art that supports or even suggests that is true. On top of that, the design was never much more than a novelty anyways, from what I’ve seen. If you have some examples showing different I’d sure be interested to see them.
Pictures? from back in "the cap 'n ball cowboy days"?
"You'd 'Ave to be dead lucky, Princess": W. Garvin:giggle:

"
The big concern about moving the support hand ahead of the cylinder on those guns is....what happens if you get a chainfire.
Potentially having extra bullets launched down either side of the barrel (or both sides) means: don't put your hand out there. "
Exactly, they weren't stupid. that's why they came up with the different hold, it was also possible (if not very good) to fire single handed from horseback leaving the left hand to keep the rains controlled.

OK, you explain why the butt plate curve gouges the shoulder from the top & the bottom when shouldered. Then go on to the purpose of the extended trigger guard.
 

Tuhlmann

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Pictures? from back in "the cap 'n ball cowboy days"?
"You'd 'Ave to be dead lucky, Princess": W. Garvin:giggle:

OK, you explain why the butt plate curve gouges the shoulder from the top & the bottom when shouldered. Then go on to the purpose of the extended trigger guard.
Respectfully, I don’t have to explain anything. It’s your assertion, to which my reply stands.

I acknowledged the multiple reasons the design is flawed, which only goes to support my assertion that they were never more than a novelty in history. Crescent buttplates and ornate brass flat scrolls at the trigger guard were common features among most long arms, and the latter on many pistols dating long before a revolving carbine. Are you claiming that those guns were held as you suggest? That’s simply ridiculous.
 

brownknees

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I never either said nor implied that its a good design.
I never said, nor implied that its anything but a novelty either.
I agree its a stupid idea to put your fingers near the cylinder gap.
So they have to go somewhere else.
Note the position of the hands &the butt plate.

Your turn now, now answer the question.
 
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Tuhlmann

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I never either said nor implied that its a good design.
I never said, nor implied that its anything but a novelty either.
Now answer the question.
Once again, I don't have to answer shit.

Once again, you are the one that made the statement on how firearms of yesterday were held so differently than today so it is up to you to prove your position.

If you don't want to back up your statements then don't say stupid shit that can't be backed up. Jeez man, I simply stated what I know to be true and asked you for examples of proof to what you are stating as fact. You want a pissing match though, I am almost always down to oblige. Let's get after it, amigo.
 

Tuhlmann

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Don't, or can't?
did you even watch the video?
& we're done here.
I don't have to defend a ridiculous comment. That's your job, and it looks like you aren't able to do it. I figured as such, but tried to be polite about it anyway. You want to say something stupid and then look like an ass failing to prove the unprovable I'd say you've succeeded.

Good luck with your one-handed rifleman work, chief. 😂
 

Tuhlmann

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This may be of interest. The original 1855s had rifle length barrels and were fitted with forestocks.

American Rifleman: Colt Model 1855

They did not sport Schutzen style buttplates.
That’s because they were likely never held like that SASS LARP’ing land-whale suggests. 😂

Now we know better, but I’ve read multiple sources, including the article you just referenced, noting the complaints of infantry & cavalry complaints on the hot powder & schrapnel the support arm is exposed to. So even if the design was intended to incorporate that silly hold (which I also don’t believe) no soldiers actually utilized it that way. A carbine was held as a carbine. This was a significant reason the design was shunned.

If this was not the case, ol’ @brownknees would’ve been able to cough something historically relevant to support his misguided theory that 19th century soldiers and cavalrymen “Rifles weren't held in the same fashion back then as they are today!” There just isn’t any proof to support that.
 

EinheitElf

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I kind of like it....if the side torch could be tamed I think that would be cool in like 500 sw ........and cheaper than the custom lever action rifle in 500sw....$5k for that but it IS cool...surprised no one has made a 500sw rifle aside from the custom lever action.....
 
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