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Hay 2023

12v71

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What do you all do with those bales?
All our super good stuff is exported to Japan and Asia, the not so good feeds cattle in local feedlots after getting mixed with cow candy, Molasses, vitamin supplements and other good stuff. The nearby dairy takes our high moisture last cutting wrapped in plastic to make fermented "baleage" similar to regular sileage.
 

12v71

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12v71

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For some reason, I'm thinking your equipment may be just a tiny bit larger and more modern than what we use????


View attachment 301338
Could be... Our balers are a quarter million dollars each. But as a kid I remember pulling those ground drive rakes like yours with a John Deere "B" or a Farmall "M", good old days. I once had the clutch go in the JD and finished up with the rake on my '72 Blazer. It had some good tunes... The JD did not.
 

MACV

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I remember back around 2012 or so. My daughter and her horse were at Murray State Univ in W Ky. There was a drought and hay was hard to find. We were buying it here in Missouri for around $12-$14 per small bale and hauling it down there. People were stealing hay from the University stables. They eventually got a steady supply from Texas.
 

stickp

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I mowed last week. Just enough to check out all the haying equipment. Has rained everyday since. Usually put in about 600 round bales. We feed just cattle and sell enough to recoup our fuel and wrap.
 

tdb59

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Could be... Our balers are a quarter million dollars each. But as a kid I remember pulling those ground drive rakes like yours with a John Deere "B" or a Farmall "M", good old days. I once had the clutch go in the JD and finished up with the rake on my '72 Blazer. It had some good tunes... The JD did not.
JDs got rhythm, tho.....
 

Invictus77

1C16:13 - J1:9
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Got a surprise this morning, new stacker rig, demo machine with 90 hours, quick check out, install a company radio and out the door View attachment 301858
We took the day off and found a beach. Grocery store deli fried chicken and a bottle of wine.

Had to "de-stress" while waiting for the hay to dry, ya know....... ;)

1685062560214.png
 

tac-40

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Boy, this brings back memories. Baling hay was the required job for all of the High School Football team. We would go around to the local farms and hire ourselves out to "bale" hay. This involved the farmer running the baler and the farm wagon while we walked beside the wagon and toss the bales by hand on to it. Two guys rode on the wagon to stack it up. We normally got paid 8-12 cents per bale each depending the type of hay with the heavier stuff like lespedeza paying more. Bales normally ran about 75 pounds and the heavy ones about 100 pound. The trick of loading the wagon was to swing the bale back then towards the wagon and at the right moment, use your knee to kick it up and over the edge of the trailer. You could always tell when a bale had a snake baled up with the hay because that bale usually sailed over the trailer and landed on the other side, accompanied by some language young men weren't supposed to know or say. On a good day, an 8-10 man crew could load 1000-1200 bales depending how many trailers were available.

 
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