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Body Armor: The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly UPDATED 3-12-2019

009.5

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It might be, if they could make more than 1 or 2 plates a month. Seriously, Bourque is in prison and I personally know the guy who is trying to keep this company alive. He has been making the metal in his garage. At first glance, the metal looks like aluminum. Supposedly, only Bourque knows how to make the secret ingredient used in the metal...

I wouldn't hold my breath waiting to obtain a completed vest.
This is news to me. Thank you for the information.
 

Artful

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March of 2013 -
Demonstration of Kryron Armor successfully stopping numerous threats including several hits of .50 cal BMG from 50 feet.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=db2_1363581806

http://allenpub.com/lantanas-siegmund-helps-develop-improved-body-armor/
...
The current standard design used in body armor includes ceramic construction that does its initial job but inconsistently. When bullets hit the edge of the original armor, they could splinter or spall, causing potential injuries or death.

So Siegmund assisted Bourque in developing an option that featured two types of metal – titanium and an aluminum composite – that are infused together and encased in spall wrap. The main active component is the aluminum composite, which is impregnated with Carbon Nanomaterials. The revised version also resists fluids, temperature and shock, high-pressure altitudes, and fungal growth and has improved electrical properties.

“It makes the material very hard yet elastic so it absorbs energy,” Siegmund said. “It absorbs the bullet and doesn’t shatter and can withstand multiple impacts so it protects you much longer. It’s much better and 25-30 percent lighter which is huge for soldiers who have to carry 40 to 50 kilograms of equipment.”

Kryron Terminators are designed to withstand multiple high-velocity impacts. In fact, Siegmund said in one test the armor took hits from 60 bullets without any problem.

While Kryron Terminators have been around for several years, getting them to market has been a challenge especially with the military.

“It has passed all the standards and requirements of the Army,” Siegmund said. “Now we’re in the process of trying to sell it to them. We’ve been able to sell to some police departments including Seattle and in Arizona.

“It’s difficult to get into the military branches because it’s a very closed industry. You have to know the right people. The marketing people in Arizona are trying to get to that level and get in front of people who make the decisions.” -
...
http://ih.advfn.com/p.php?pid=nmona&article=59232399
Bourque Industries, Inc. (BORK) Announced Conclusion of Initial Independent Lab Testing of Kryron with Positive Results



Bourque Industries announced today that it had concluded initial testing of its Kryron material through two Independent Laboratories. Kryron was tested by Alfred University and under the direction of Bourque's independent consultant, Robert Rieger, who then rendered a report based on the lab findings.



This testing did not focus on the ballistics characteristics of Kryron, but rather on other properties of the material that management believes could have commercial application.



Mr. Rieger reported that thermal conductivity for Kryron was so high that it could not be measured on the Alfred University equipment, concluding that ?this is an extremely positive finding which might permit Kryron to be a superior thermal management (including heat sink) material?.



Mr. Rieger received an MBA from Syracuse University, and MS CERE and BCERE Ceramic Engineering degrees from Georgia Institute of Technology. During Mr. Rieger?s career he served in various positions with M-Cubed Technologies, Inc., University of Arizona, Eller College of Management, Fisher Scientific International, Ferro Corporation and others.



More testing is planned to explore further the characteristics of Kryron for application as a potential heat sink material, and also to determine and document its potential benefits in ballistic armor applications and in other markets and applications.
and

Bourque Industries Announces Board Change

Tucson, AZ August 19, 2013 -- Bourque Industries (Pink Sheets: BORK), a development stage Company exploring and developing metal alloys and related product applications using a patented metal-alloying process called Kryron, announced today that it is changing the makeup of its Board of Directors. Board Members, Charmaine 'Sandy' Berry, Raymond Humphrey, and Scott Stover will make-up the re-constituted Board, and will elect as the new Chairman of the Board, a person still to be determined. Messrs. Schissler, Willis, Kotelec and Heffron have under their own volition, opted not to serve an additional term and be reappointed, in each case for personal or business reasons unrelated to Bourque and its business and activities.

The reconstituted board intends to focus the company interests in three areas; immediately identifying and recruiting key executive leadership; identifying scientific personnel that will further test and communicate the special properties of Kryron, the company's primary asset; and securing new sales channels that will help underwrite the Company's ongoing business plan.

About Bourque Industries


Bourque Industries is a development stage company with a business plan in the field of advanced materials science directed to developing and then producing metal alloys and related product applications using a patented metal-alloying process known as Kryron. Kryronized alloys may have global potential for unique applications across a wide range of industries. The current applications being explored are directed to ballistic armor and electrical products. Our initial goal is to prove up the value of our patented alloy. Please visit www.bourqueindustries.com.
So it looks like the company is still alive.
 
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4x401

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Well, great news- getting so much in the way of emails and IM's I decided it is time to blog. Check out drmorgear.wordpress.com :) Still getting it up, so check back for updates.
So let the Brain Picking BEGIN!!:D
 

gates

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Are the Gamma plates currently sold by Blue Line Gear (PACA product?) still gtg or is there something better in the weight/rating class for similar $?
 

Roadmarker

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Thanks for your efforts 009.5. I've finally figured that the weight penalty vs the protection benefit of body armor is kind of a no brainer. The newer stuff is so light now....what's a couple pounds among friends right? My knowledge of body armor came from Marine flack jackets originally procurred in the Vietnam era. They were heavy and almost useless. I think they were intended for shrapnel protection. The funny part is that they were issued twenty years after that conflict ended. Gotta love the frugality of the Corps. Fast forward twenty five years and the world is a changed place.
The materials science just keeps advancing, almost as fast as the situation keeps declining. I wonder if there is any correlation there? :shades:
 

ftierson

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...Rifle armor is rated either level III or IV. Now, the interesting thing is, the higher rating is not necessarily better. If you expect to be facing enemies with AP capability, the IV is nice to have (the spec calls for the plate to stop ONE round of .30-06 M2 AP black tip. One round). If you are expecting normal mild steel or lead cored, go with III by all means. The spec for III calls for stopping 6 rounds of M80 .308 ball @ 2750FPS within a 6" circle. So much better multi hit. Always read the specs! ...
I agree that you should always read the specs...

As I remember it, the milspec for ESAPI plates calls for defeating three rounds of .30CAL M2 AP (which is slightly different than the NIJ level IV rating, of course)...

Thanks for posting all the interesting info...

Forrest
 

009.5

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I agree that you should always read the specs...

As I remember it, the milspec for ESAPI plates calls for defeating three rounds of .30CAL M2 AP (which is slightly different than the NIJ level IV rating, of course)...

Thanks for posting all the interesting info...

Forrest
Gold star!

MIL and NIJ tests are different, and I will be publishing a post on the various differences between all past and current test standards and methodologies soon.

Thank you for the kind words.
 

gates

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The Blue Line plates showed up, they are 2005 MFG dated - look like N.O.S. - I found some concern on the web that because of the age of the plates the glue holding the strike face to the underlying composite might have degraded to the point that when you shoot one of these plates they delaminate - assuming they are in a good carrier they should hold together and be good for a few hits depending but I was wondering if anyone had an opinion on this.
 

009.5

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The Blue Line plates showed up, they are 2005 MFG dated - look like N.O.S. - I found some concern on the web that because of the age of the plates the glue holding the strike face to the underlying composite might have degraded to the point that when you shoot one of these plates they delaminate - assuming they are in a good carrier they should hold together and be good for a few hits depending but I was wondering if anyone had an opinion on this.
Gates, thanks for the update and concerns.

This is worthy of a post all on its own. I recall a paper written in IJIE discussing greater efficacy in armor systems where the elements were weakly adhered vs. strongly adhered (cover face, hardface element, backing element). My own testing has shown this to be valid.

The mechanism was not well understood, but I think it may have something to do with a micro version of the air-gap effect, and decoupling of the transmitted shocks through the different materials. As long as the strike face is structurally sound, my OPINION is that you should be fine. I will try to find the link to the paper referenced above and send it to you, if you are interested.
 

SWOHFAL

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Any combo armor out there that resists ballistic and cut/stab threats pretty well. From what you wrote, I'd assume that you might be able to find NIJ II or IIIa KR1/SP1 and III or IV that may be KR/SP2 or KR/SP3 because of bulk issues.

Can you layer the lower-level soft cut/stab over lower grade (soft) ballistic armors and bump up the protection of the latter a notch if the combination of the two kinds of protection are not easily found together? I'm wondering from both a technical and a practical standpoint the feasibility of layering regarding bulk and comfort and temperature regulation.
 

009.5

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Any combo armor out there that resists ballistic and cut/stab threats pretty well. From what you wrote, I'd assume that you might be able to find NIJ II or IIIa KR1/SP1 and III or IV that may be KR/SP2 or KR/SP3 because of bulk issues.

Can you layer the lower-level soft cut/stab over lower grade (soft) ballistic armors and bump up the protection of the latter a notch if the combination of the two kinds of protection are not easily found together? I'm wondering from both a technical and a practical standpoint the feasibility of layering regarding bulk and comfort and temperature regulation.
That is a good question. In my testing, there is some benefit to layering, but by putting the ballistic armor on OVER the stab layer. I did not see a full level equivalent improvement, but the BFD reduction was noticeable.

The reasoning behind this is that the knife/stab armor is going to see benefit in having more material over it (increasing the work the point/cutting edge has to do), while typically the denier of knife/stab armor is too small to have much affect on the initial strike of a bullet.
 

SWOHFAL

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That is a good question. In my testing, there is some benefit to layering, but by putting the ballistic armor on OVER the stab layer. I did not see a full level equivalent improvement, but the BFD reduction was noticeable.

The reasoning behind this is that the knife/stab armor is going to see benefit in having more material over it (increasing the work the point/cutting edge has to do), while typically the denier of knife/stab armor is too small to have much affect on the initial strike of a bullet.
Another question - which of these generally cost more, ballistic or cut/stab? I would think that putting the stab armor on the outside would help protect the ballistic vest, which I expect cost more, from damage from non-ballistic threats, even if it doesn't increase ballistic protection.
 

009.5

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Another question - which of these generally cost more, ballistic or cut/stab? I would think that putting the stab armor on the outside would help protect the ballistic vest, which I expect cost more, from damage from non-ballistic threats, even if it doesn't increase ballistic protection.
Knife/stab is usually more expensive, due to the (significantly) more expensive material for its construction. A bullet strike compromises the effectiveness of stab armor much more than the converse, due to the much finer weave of the fabric. I hope to be able to rerun the test to illustrate this phenomena on my blog within a few months, funds permitting.
 

009.5

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Wanted to give you guys the heads up before I get to a review. These plates:

http://store.appalachiantraining.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=GUARDIAN-IVTriple

are currently the best deal for standalone level IV I have seen.

That is $332 plus ship for a pair. :O No connection to Appalachian Training, but Mike is a cool guy to deal with. Let him know I pointed you in his direction.

Will be posting a review very soon.

ETA: Link fixed
 
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009.5

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UPDATE: It has come to my attention that there is a rumor circulating that deployed vehicle airbags are made of Kevlar, and can be used as ballistic armor.

THIS IS FALSE. Vehicular airbags are made with either polyamide (Nylon) or polyester. They have no ballistic properties whatsoever.

Airbags are white. Kevlar is bright yellow.

Polyamide and polyester drip/melt/burn. Kevlar chars/self-extinguishes.

DO NOT USE DEPLOYED AIRBAGS FOR PROTECTION OF LIFE OR PROPERTY.
 

SAFN49

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UPDATE: It has come to my attention that there is a rumor circulating that deployed vehicle airbags are made of Kevlar, and can be used as ballistic armor.

THIS IS FALSE. Vehicular airbags are made with either polyamide (Nylon) or polyester. They have no ballistic properties whatsoever.

Airbags are white. Kevlar is bright yellow.

Polyamide and polyester drip/melt/burn. Kevlar chars/self-extinguishes.

DO NOT USE DEPLOYED AIRBAGS FOR PROTECTION OF LIFE OR PROPERTY.
Most vehicle airbags are made of ballistic nylon, nylon 6 or 6,6. It is the same nylon used in flak jackets in Vietnam. A M1951 or M1955 flak jacket would stop a 7.62x25 round point blank. Only problem of course was they weighed 10 pounds. So yes airbag material does have ballistic properties, not as good as Kevlar, and you need a lot more of it.
 

inrem

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M-1951 flak jacket is 12 plies of ballistic nylon. No way that will stop a round from a Tokarov, except at extreme range or a very strange angle.

Vietnam aircrew ceramic chicken plate - sure. PASGT kevlar vests of the 1980's - something slow like a .45 sure, but not a 7.62x25 at close range. Circa 2000 Inerceptor Armor - perhaps (but 7.62x25 is hard to stop).
 

009.5

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MAJOR UPDATE 5-28:

A company called Armor Wear just beat everyone to market with their new AR680 plates. These are Ultra-Hard Steel, and will stop M193 at 3000 fps and above. I no longer recommend AR500 steel plates, with minimum being Mil-HHS (Maingun), and best practices being UHS.

https://armour-wear.com/shop/all/ar680-steel-plate/

Plates are 6.2 lb. without coating and 7.4 with.
 
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