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-   -   Is there a realistic threat to our food supply? (https://www.falfiles.com/forums/showthread.php?t=451225)

Tak March 18, 2020 12:08

Is there a realistic threat to our food supply?
 
We know there is panic buying.

We know there are businesses of all types shutting down.

What do you think the real impact or threat will be to food supplies?

Bawana jim March 18, 2020 12:17

Of course mine is just an opinion, yes we are under attack right now and we don't know how this ends up. 911 they shut down transportation for a bit but we got on our feet quickly. We have never seen our government doing what it is today. Peoples lives are being destroyed by this clamp down on America.

Will you need guns and ammo? Two weeks from now will it all be over or will it have escalated to a war with China. Guns and ammo is an insurance policy for your home and you pray to God nothing ever happens that you need that insurance.

Shoots High March 18, 2020 12:22

Remember how long it took for .22 LR to come back. There will continue to be food hoarding for awhile to come.

RG Coburn March 18, 2020 14:12

One of my concerns is trucking. You need to be able to move the product from field,to elevator,to mill,to factory,to distributor,to store,to customer. Every link in that chain requires a rig and driver. Look at a lot of the truck drivers...over weight,fifty-somethings,health problems,etc. Prime virus candidates. Current generation isn't truckers. That's like work or something.

Sig220 March 18, 2020 14:48

Quote:

Originally Posted by 7.62FMJ (Post 4855429)
The virus can be spread to household pets so I imagine it can be spread to other mammals. This could be a very serious problem when the milk you drink, the pork chops you grill, or even the burgers you order are infected with the virus.

That would be a stretch..... that the virus could live through the temperatures of cooked meat and be spread by consumption of meat. When it is actually spread by a virus that escapes the respiratory system by mucus and breath. :facepalm:

In other words, there are NO reported cases where the virus has spread through contaminated meat or milk. :facepalm:

If you are still worried, just freeze it first then cook it till it quits running juices and tastes like asphalt shingles. :facepalm:

yellowhand March 18, 2020 15:10

Quote:

Originally Posted by RG Coburn (Post 4855413)
One of my concerns is trucking. You need to be able to move the product from field,to elevator,to mill,to factory,to distributor,to store,to customer. Every link in that chain requires a rig and driver. Look at a lot of the truck drivers...over weight,fifty-somethings,health problems,etc. Prime virus candidates. Current generation isn't truckers. That's like work or something.

All of the above,,,are the real concerns.
Disrupt the trucks,,,cities starve................

Jaxxas March 18, 2020 15:44

It all really depends on when the 'curve flattens' on rising infections. I've been checking this site at the CDC.

Yesterday it was at 4200 or so and today it is at 7000 or so. It updates every day around noon.

Unfortunately I've read that there could be 6 cases for every 1 they know about.

Bug Tussell March 18, 2020 20:03

I've got irrigation scheduled for Friday end of month. I'm assuming that even if we go into hard core quarantine that I'll be able to irrigate since it's for the common good.

I want to have a good crop this year because we all may need it. Getting chemicals may be a challenge if supply lines are disrupted but we can eat wormy apples - just don't eat them in the dark.... :biggrin:

C2A1 March 18, 2020 20:10

Worms are apple protein.

Eyeguy March 18, 2020 20:22

Friend who’s a manager at a large chain grocer says one of the end supply issues, actually getting food to the grocery store, is that drivers are limited to a set number of hours they can drive per day/week, by the department of transportation. DOT has lifted those restrictions previously when panic buying during hurricanes created shortages in my state. Haven’t seen that action taken here currently to help get more product into the stores.

Bawana jim March 18, 2020 20:55

Stores don't keep huge inventories and do a next day order system. System got broken with the panic. They have until the panic foods run out to get the system working again. If the shelves start going bare then a real panic will set in. At that point the government will put together food operations to feed folks in bread lines.

Don't let your dog's run loose.

cotter March 18, 2020 21:21

Add in the seed jas to get to the field, fuel to run the machines and a decent weather year for the crops.

Stores have quit accepting returns on food and associated losses. This alone will stop some of the panic buying of food stuffs. Once peoples freezers are full they will quit buying fresh food. Canned and other semiperishables the sky is the limit. Eventually the EBT will be empty, the CC will be maxed and the system will catch up.

Grinder March 19, 2020 09:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eyeguy (Post 4855573)
Friend who’s a manager at a large chain grocer says one of the end supply issues, actually getting food to the grocery store, is that drivers are limited to a set number of hours they can drive per day/week, by the department of transportation. DOT has lifted those restrictions previously when panic buying during hurricanes created shortages in my state. Haven’t seen that action taken here currently to help get more product into the stores.

I heard Trump was already on it

Texgunner March 19, 2020 10:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grinder (Post 4855759)
I heard Trump was already on it

He's probably got his three best men on it right now.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Y3zeFScHxsU" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>

TenTea March 19, 2020 10:24

Quote:

Originally Posted by Texgunner (Post 4855780)
He's probably got his three best men on it right now.
Pep Boys Spot

In every myth a grain of truth. :rofl:

Whydah March 19, 2020 10:37

I have a friend who is a meat cutter for Kroger's. On my last visit the TP shelves were empty. The canned vegetable isle was mostly empty, as was the pasta shelves. That was last Sunday. He told me the store was inundated the day before and people hit those three areas heavily, including canned soup. He texted me later in the day and told me that they had been advised that the company buyers are not able to procure a lot of food items they normally carry and cannot fill the warehouses. Kroger is now rationing products to all of its stores in hopes that all stores will get a little. Limits have been placed on the customers as well. I believe that the panic buying will continue to meats, dairy, and produce... both fresh and frozen.
I have read that up to 86% of those infected don't even know it and continue infecting others. Up until recently we have not had any confirmed cases in my region, but that may have now changed since a local worker with "flu-like" systems returned to work after being tested and the test came back "presumptive positive". Now the center is closed temporarily and employees sent home... but to what end?

gunplumber March 19, 2020 10:58

Even in crisis areas from natural disaster, the problem is rarely a shortage of food - at the ports. It's the distribution.

Look at Haiti, PR, etc. Sure, we have shiploads of rice from every humanitarian organization in the world. They are sitting at the docks (unless the docks were destroyed by tsunami). The roads are washed out. Can't get it from here to there.

Logistics is the key to military, commercial and humanitarian operations.

Look at the Berlin Airlift. Millions of people donating supplies. But the planes have to come from 50 different locations, drop over an apartment building to land on a short runway, and just minutes to offload, refuel, takeoff and make room for the next plane - which will be out of fuel in 10 minutes. And there are 15 more stacked up, waiting, and running out of fuel. Coincidentally, the mathematics necessary to make that operation run as well as it did, are the basis for modern computer algorithms.

ftierson March 19, 2020 11:46

Quote:

Originally Posted by gunplumber (Post 4855817)
Even in crisis areas from natural disaster, the problem is rarely a shortage of food - at the ports. It's the distribution.

Look at Haiti, PR, etc. Sure, we have shiploads of rice from every humanitarian organization in the world. They are sitting at the docks (unless the docks were destroyed by tsunami). The roads are washed out. Can't get it from here to there.

Logistics is the key to military, commercial and humanitarian operations.

Look at the Berlin Airlift. Millions of people donating supplies. But the planes have to come from 50 different locations, drop over an apartment building to land on a short runway, and just minutes to offload, refuel, takeoff and make room for the next plane - which will be out of fuel in 10 minutes. And there are 15 more stacked up, waiting, and running out of fuel. Coincidentally, the mathematics necessary to make that operation run as well as it did, are the basis for modern computer algorithms.

That's only true unless the complete production system has collapsed. Disrupt that long enough and there's nothing to load on the trucks or planes...

People thinking that this all will be over soon are probably the crack pipe users.

I suspect that the world shutting down will severely disrupt food production (like in growing shit) this season.

That'll leave a mark...

Forrest

yellowhand March 19, 2020 12:09

Quote:

Originally Posted by ftierson (Post 4855841)
That's only true unless the complete production system has collapsed. Disrupt that long enough and there's nothing to load on the trucks or planes...

People thinking that this all will be over soon are probably the crack pipe users.

I suspect that the world shutting down will severely disrupt food production (like in growing shit) this season.

That'll leave a mark...

Forrest

Pass me the pipe then.:wink:

I suspect,,,we'll see an effective treatment cocktail of meds to stave off deaths inside 90 days,,and a vaccine before November.:wink:

SARs blew up,,,killed 900 people or so,,,the world was going to end,,and then,,,,,,,it just did what viruses do,,,it just went away.

This one,,,is about 80/85 identical to SARs,,,,that last 15/20%,,,our people,,humans,,will crack it.

A bad bug will one day kill billions of people,,,but today,,subject to change of course,,,this just ain't it.

If food production/transport/distribution is severely threaten in this country,,,,well,,,,to all them lovely farm ladies,,,,GI's love apple pie and hot coffee at all times of day and night,,and even their homely daughters can find a husband among our younger troops....:D

ftierson March 19, 2020 12:32

Quote:

Originally Posted by yellowhand (Post 4855854)
Pass me the pipe then.:wink:

I suspect,,,we'll see an effective treatment cocktail of meds to stave off deaths inside 90 days,,and a vaccine before November.:wink:

SARs blew up,,,killed 900 people or so,,,the world was going to end,,and then,,,,,,,it just did what viruses do,,,it just went away.

This one,,,is about 80/85 identical to SARs,,,,that last 15/20%,,,our people,,humans,,will crack it.

A bad bug will one day kill billions of people,,,but today,,subject to change of course,,,this just ain't it.

If food production/transport/distribution is severely threaten in this country,,,,well,,,,to all them lovely farm ladies,,,,GI's love apple pie and hot coffee at all times of day and night,,and even their homely daughters can find a husband among our younger troops....:D

Sorry, I don't have any crack pipes to pass... :)

Normalcy bias is certainly a wondrous thing... :)

And even with my background in considering all these types of scenarios, I find that I'm not immune to it. I didn't expect that...

Learn something new every day...

Forrest

yellowhand March 19, 2020 12:57

Quote:

Originally Posted by ftierson (Post 4855875)
Sorry, I don't have any crack pipes to pass... :)

Normalcy bias is certainly a wondrous thing... :)

And even with my background in considering all these types of scenarios, I find that I'm not immune to it. I didn't expect that...

Learn something new every day...

Forrest

We're at 150 or so deaths contributed to this virus,,might be a little higher,,or even lower,,and plus 20,000 flu deaths this season.

Today,,,they are putting out,,a common in use drug killed this virus in a small number of test cases,,claiming 100% success rate.

They will ramp up the next test to 1000 people,,,and its just a Guess on my part,,,but I'd expect to see this drug used in Italy in mass,,now,,,due to their death numbers and poor medical facilities etc.

When your people are dropping dead,,,and anything appears to work,,you go for it........

The smartest/finest scientist the world over are working on this problem,,and they have a combined pretty good track record at defeating shit like this.

Data/information changes hourly,,,right now,,,things are looking pretty good.

Whydah March 19, 2020 17:16

The Coronavirus pandemic and the agenda of certain 'behind the curtain' globalists are mutually exclusive. The Coronavirus is just the vehicle.

RG Coburn March 19, 2020 22:21

The farmers just tilled and drilled the fields around my house. Never saw them get into the field this early. Its still cold here,like 40's. The soil is really supposed to be warmer before planting. I'm not sure what exactly they planted. I suspect sugar beets. It was soys last year.
I'm definitely growing a garden this year,and canning stuff like crazy.

Bawana jim March 19, 2020 22:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by Whydah (Post 4855978)
The Coronavirus pandemic and the agenda of certain 'behind the curtain' globalists are mutually exclusive. The Coronavirus is just the vehicle.

Looks like they practiced it before it happened.


"The Trump administration simulated the ability of the United States to handle a flulike pandemic months before the coronavirus turned the scenario into a reality.

The Health and Human Services Department led the exercise, known as the "Crimson Contagion," last year in conjunction with dozens of states and federal agencies, according to the New York Times. HHS also invited charitable groups, insurance companies, and major hospitals to take part in the effort.

Former Air Force physician Robert Kadlec, who has studied biodefense issues for decades, led the exercise, which imagined a contagious disease that originated in China and spread globally after nearly three dozen tourists were infected and returned home. The hypothetical outbreak spread quickly through the U.S. after an infected person attended a concert packed with thousands of others."

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/3826331/posts

Exit308 March 20, 2020 17:00

Quote:

Originally Posted by yellowhand (Post 4855854)
This one,,,is about 80/85 identical to SARs,,,,that last 15/20%,,,our people,,humans,,will crack it.

And humans have 98% identical DNA to chimps, so................:whistling:

Exit308 March 20, 2020 17:08

To answer the question at the core of this thread, from what I can gather, yes, there is a threat to our food supply, as we have known it.

It is the activity of the Sun.

If, as some contend, we are entering a Grand Solar Minimum, then crop growing seasons and zones are in flux.

If we have another wet spring planting season and early wet harvest season like 2019, I believe you will start to see stress appear in the food supply.

That doesn't even take into account that supply chains from China (tractor and machine parts, fertilizers, ag chemicals, packaging) as well as food processing here in the U.S.(meat packing, canneries, etc.) are being impacted by the current viral problem.

So yes.
Plant a garden if you have the ability.

ETA: We should have some warning as the shortages will hit in the middle east and northern Africa first. So watch the news for reports of food riots and such in areas of the world that spend a disproportionate amount of their earnings on food, as they will feel the price increases first and will react, probably violently. Arab Spring comes to mind.


https://assets.weforum.org/editor/la...BKJz2N_AyU.PNG

yellowhand March 20, 2020 18:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exit308 (Post 4856482)
And humans have 98% identical DNA to chimps, so................:whistling:

:facepalm:

meltblown March 20, 2020 20:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by yellowhand (Post 4856507)
:facepalm:

I'm on board with Pop Tarts. Cutting back on eating to keep it healthy. 2 of those and a left over tater salad from the BBQ shack was good for lunch. Got 2 nice ribeyes for supper i got on the way back from Milam Co after shooting with TG. I need to fence in and grow 2 cows

Exit308 March 20, 2020 20:34

Quote:

Originally Posted by yellowhand (Post 4856507)
:facepalm:

What???

yellowhand March 21, 2020 00:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by Exit308 (Post 4856569)
What???

Good question.

Outlaw Patriot March 25, 2020 20:09

My biggest worry is the wildfire season in California disrupting agriculture and causing a longer term shortage. I think this should be prevented by testing the firefighters though. But if we cant..

meltblown March 25, 2020 20:35

2 dozen frosted Pop Tarts. Blueberry and strawberry. Ding Dongs are getting low, but tired of them and granola bars. Shit I ain't that hungry sitting on my ass all the time. No way I can use this time to go buy stuff and start a project like a fence. I may though see if any bikers need to shed a 1200 Sportster like cheap, cheap.

Bawana jim March 25, 2020 20:43

Don't worry be happy...

https://youtu.be/d-diB65scQU

allamerican401 March 26, 2020 12:14

As long as fuel pumps keep working, truckers keep driving, and trains keep chugging, we'll have transportation of goods. Other parts of distribution and manufacturing may be the problem. Perdue walkouts. How many warehouse workers will get sick or say "screw this"?
https://www.13wmaz.com/mobile/articl...CE0WUnsv2HrT4I

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.was...Mi7JyUaIBFvl2Q

TheOtherChris March 26, 2020 14:40

Quote:

Originally Posted by allamerican401 (Post 4859630)
As long as fuel pumps keep working, truckers keep driving, and trains keep chugging, we'll have transportation of goods. Other parts of distribution and manufacturing may be the problem. Perdue walkouts. How many warehouse workers will get sick or say "screw this"?

I have already heard of OTR truckers doing this. One guy called dispatch and told them the truck was in a lot with the key hidden and he was renting a car and going home.

ftierson March 26, 2020 14:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheOtherChris (Post 4859703)
I have already heard of OTR truckers doing this. One guy called dispatch and told them the truck was in a lot with the key hidden and he was renting a car and going home.

Well, that's what police and the Army are for, to force people to do .gov's bidding as we all are identified as perps and serfs...

Who could have seen this coming...?

Forrest

hueyville March 28, 2020 10:57

Had to plan a run to add some backup to food supply and Kroger had a perfect storm of sale items wanted to add to backup supply. Mostly cheese, almond "milk", yogurt, peanut butter for wife, crackers, Coca-Cola, Gatorade plus a quick browse of what they had. Milk, toilet paper, cleaning items, etc were wiped out. Been trying to convince friends and people on ham radio to buy almond milk.

Kroger has so much almond milk they had Almond Breeze marked down a buck per container plus a sale that said buy five and get an additional $5 off so put five in buggy. Coolers were full to overflowing with every brand, variety and flavor of soy milk, coconut milk and almond milk. All items added followed written store policy on quantities and left with $175.x x total ring out that after store discounts, store coupons and manufacturers coupons total dropped to 101.45 for $74.xx savings. Girl at register bowed up and said milk is limited to 3 containers. Said it's not milk, not a dairy product and not on list of limited items.

Lead teller came over said not on his list of limited items and looked up to see they had a sale on five units and told check out girl would not have five item sale if limited to three. She refused to follow her supervisors determination and had to get a store manager who looked at her and said it's all on sale, no limit as we can't give it away right now because everyone wants "real milk" not almond, soy or coconut squeezings. She was still a hag and puffed up mad because we got to buy five "milks" which five half gallons of almond milk is less volume than three gallon jugs of real milk. The coupons really pissed her off when saw we got a $75 discount during an emergency.

The offending item:
https://i1320.photobucket.com/albums...psw1qcdtef.jpg

Ignorance is bad enough but to get upset after two of her bosses said it was not a limited item and we could get ten more if wanted. Issue is both refrigerators are stuffed with almond milk per usual and have at least twenty gallons of long term shelf storage but to have enough to keep our three month rotation of cold storage we needed the five half gallons.

Met a man in his nineties as leaving who had three food items trying to buy at self checkout with nickles and pennies having trouble with the self checkout due to age and technology. Machine didn't seem to like the endless stream of change and kept spitting it out. Went over and pulled out card to pay his under $5 purchase (all the money he had) and offered to take him through store to get anything else he wanted as felt a pack of cheapest hotdogs ever seen, can of potted meat and loaf of bread was not enough food for the man. I normally don't get charitable outside of church as they have committee's to determine need to reduce cons plus know of multiple local food banks but this is strange times.

Same teller that bowed on my five almond milks was just a few feet away and heard my offer to take him back through store and called senior teller/clerk saying I was trying to get an old man to help me buy more items to break the rules on item limits. Took store manager intervention again to let me buy the old man's $5 in grocery bag with three food items but when said wanted to take him through store and buy all the food he wanted was told that was not allowed, would have to come back later to make additional purchases due to people bringing multiple family members to fill different buggies to get around limits, taking groceries to car then coming back in and buying another buggy full multiple times, etc. Can't help what seemed to be a very financially challenged elderly person for fear of us running a con? I have used same store since it opened and everyone that's been there more than a month or two recognizes me but maybe because always buy sale items in bulk with lots of coupons they felt I was trying to con them but manager had to see the old man was suffering. Got him to his $500 Ford Ranger and gave him my business card with cell number and hope he calls so able to take him to food bank unless he is too proud to go.

allamerican401 March 30, 2020 02:11

I didn't realize Jay Carney worked for amazon. These walkouts are going to be a problem. And this is still early on.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.cnn...rus/index.html

Whydah March 30, 2020 15:25

Prior to any food finding its way to the hungry public it must first be either grown, raised, harvested, and processed. Growing seasons globally have not been very good over the past few years. Droughts, locusts, unseasonably cold temps, unseasonably hot temps, wet weather, floods, sicknesses in food stock animals, now entering into a period of low sunspot activity - all are and have affected food production around the globe. Australia has just had its worst wheat production in history. Insiders have reported that China doesn't have enough rice stocks to afford each person a cup of rice a day, plus their pigs are dying. How about the supply chain and its fragility from truck tires to spare parts to repair a refrigeration unit? No one maintains a deep inventory any longer. A lot goes into getting that 5# bag of potatoes into your local grocery! I don't think most people have an inklings about how serious this food situation might become.

ftierson March 30, 2020 15:58

Quote:

Originally Posted by Whydah (Post 4861992)
Prior to any food finding its way to the hungry public it must first be either grown, raised, harvested, and processed. Growing seasons globally have not been very good over the past few years. Droughts, locusts, unseasonably cold temps, unseasonably hot temps, wet weather, floods, sicknesses in food stock animals, now entering into a period of low sunspot activity - all are and have affected food production around the globe. Australia has just had its worst wheat production in history. Insiders have reported that China doesn't have enough rice stocks to afford each person a cup of rice a day, plus their pigs are dying. How about the supply chain and its fragility from truck tires to spare parts to repair a refrigeration unit? No one maintains a deep inventory any longer. A lot goes into getting that 5# bag of potatoes into your local grocery! I don't think most people have an inklings about how serious this food situation might become.

And, as grocery employees contract COVID 19 (as is already happening), another wrinkle added to the tapestry...

Forrest

okiefarmer March 30, 2020 19:35

Quote:

Originally Posted by Whydah (Post 4861992)
Prior to any food finding its way to the hungry public it must first be either grown, raised, harvested, and processed. Growing seasons globally have not been very good over the past few years. Droughts, locusts, unseasonably cold temps, unseasonably hot temps, wet weather, floods, sicknesses in food stock animals, now entering into a period of low sunspot activity - all are and have affected food production around the globe. Australia has just had its worst wheat production in history. Insiders have reported that China doesn't have enough rice stocks to afford each person a cup of rice a day, plus their pigs are dying. How about the supply chain and its fragility from truck tires to spare parts to repair a refrigeration unit? No one maintains a deep inventory any longer. A lot goes into getting that 5# bag of potatoes into your local grocery! I don't think most people have an inklings about how serious this food situation might become.

Add to that the fact that your food travels an average of 1500 miles before reaching your table. If trucking is impeded in any way, this is the first place we will see shortages IMHO.

Bawana jim March 30, 2020 20:10

Quote:

Originally Posted by okiefarmer (Post 4862112)
Add to that the fact that your food travels an average of 1500 miles before reaching your table. If trucking is impeded in any way, this is the first place we will see shortages IMHO.

A little drab of news that has some significant reason to be concerned.. I was reading this morning the Nation's truck drivers are petioning the government to let them be armed in every state. What do you think they see comming?

okiefarmer March 30, 2020 20:58

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bawana jim (Post 4862128)
A little drab of news that has some significant reason to be concerned.. I was reading this morning the Nation's truck drivers are petioning the government to let them be armed in every state. What do you think they see comming?

Food pirates.:confused::confused::confused:

Hadn't seen that yet. Interesting.

And to think, if we just would have had hillary in office, or for that matter, any one that j sanctioned, none of this would be happening.:wink::wink:

Bawana jim March 30, 2020 22:40

Quote:

Originally Posted by okiefarmer (Post 4862149)
Food pirates.:confused::confused::confused:

Hadn't seen that yet. Interesting.

And to think, if we just would have had hillary in office, or for that matter, any one that j sanctioned, none of this would be happening.:wink::wink:

Ammo land had the story on the truckers. When I was driving truck in Iraq the most targeted trucks to disable were the food trucks. People were hungry. 3 days later as you came through again the wasn't much left that wasn't taken by the Iraqis.

gentlemanjoe March 30, 2020 23:09

Our greatest threat to food is Monsanto.:whistling:

justashooter March 30, 2020 23:48

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bawana jim (Post 4862207)
Ammo land had the story on the truckers. When I was driving truck in Iraq the most targeted trucks to disable were the food trucks. People were hungry. 3 days later as you came through again the wasn't much left that wasn't taken by the Iraqis.

recent story on breitbart about "south asians" and africans robbing and burning food trucks in london, and robbing nurses of badges to get priority free food rations slated for medical staff. if they try that here they will get shot.

justashooter March 30, 2020 23:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by Whydah (Post 4855799)
I have read that up to 86% of those infected don't even know it and continue infecting others.

people who are asymptomatic will have a 10-14 day course and be shedders for about 3 days of that, in the beginning of second week. after that they will be immunes.

justashooter March 30, 2020 23:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bawana jim (Post 4856150)
Looks like they practiced it before it happened.


"The Trump administration simulated the ability of the United States to handle a flulike pandemic months before the coronavirus turned the scenario into a reality.

the exercise, which imagined a contagious disease that originated in China and spread globally after nearly three dozen tourists were infected and returned home. The hypothetical outbreak spread quickly through the U.S. after an infected person attended a concert packed with thousands of others."

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/3826331/posts

prolly just more evidence that the chinese are playing chicken with him, and politely suggested that he needs to reduce the tarrifs because a good chinese economy might be important to USA "if something really bad, like a pandemic, just happens..."

this kind of negotiation is politely done, and within my direct experience in the 5 years i did business at a fairly high level in china. implication of threat with the expectation that it will be noticed, but will not be called out, is baseline for chinese negotiation.

ftierson March 31, 2020 01:06

Quote:

Originally Posted by justashooter (Post 4862223)
prolly just more evidence that the chinese are playing chicken with him, and politely suggested that he needs to reduce the tarrifs because a good chinese economy might be important to USA "if something really bad, like a pandemic, just happens..."

this kind of negotiation is politely done, and within my direct experience in the 5 years i did business at a fairly high level in china. implication of threat with the expectation that it will be noticed, but will not be called out, is baseline for chinese negotiation.

And there's certainly that...

Forrest

Whydah March 31, 2020 06:10

Seems like the panic has already begun in some places.

https://www.theblaze.com/news/pittsb...-surge-in-need


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