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HELLBILLY
March 01, 2007, 18:00
Confederate money question.


Am in the process of accruing a few Confederate bills, the question. Are the Confederate twos the same size as the tens ?


If any one has a Confederate two dollar bill in there collection I would appreciate it if you could give me the measurements.

DABTL
March 01, 2007, 19:08
Originally posted by HELLBILLY
Confederate money question.


Am in the process of accruing a few Confederate bills, the question. Are the Confederate twos the same size as the tens ?


If any one has a Confederate two dollar bill in there collection I would appreciate it if you could give me the measurements.

All Confederate bills were of approximately the same size, except for the .50 note. It was much smaller. There is a variance because they were hand cut for the most part.

The hardest to find are the Montgomery issue notes and the later seventh series $500 The remainder are fairly common.

HELLBILLY
March 01, 2007, 19:22
I have a confederate 10 dollar bill which I know to be authentic it measures aprox.
7 by 3 inches
I have someone trying to pass a Confederate two dollar bill off as original.
It measures

5.25 By 2.4 inches is this measurement correct? Or is this person trying to sell me a phony bill?

DABTL
March 01, 2007, 19:58
Originally posted by HELLBILLY
I have a confederate 10 dollar bill which I know to be authentic it measures aprox.
7 by 3 inches
I have someone trying to pass a Confederate two dollar bill off as original.
It measures

5.25 By 2.4 inches is this measurement correct? Or is this person trying to sell me a phony bill?

There are generally two different styles and three different sizes of CSA Notes. All but 7 of the notes measure approximately 3 and 1/8 inches high by 7 and 1/4 inches long. The two 50 cents notes are approximately 2 and 1/4 inches high by 4 and 1/4 inches long. All 1861 and 1862 $1 and $2 notes measure approximately 2 and 3/4 inches high by 6 inches long.

HELLBILLY
March 01, 2007, 20:19
So if the two in question, is significantly smaller then the 10 it is fake?

The two is dated Feb 17 1864

DABTL
March 01, 2007, 21:52
Originally posted by HELLBILLY
So if the two in question, is significantly smaller then the 10 it is fake?

The two is dated Feb 17 1864

Probably came from Post Toasties in the 1960's.

There were and are many Confederate fakes being commercially produced.

The Feb. 1864 is seventh issue currency, the best of the lot, and uniform in appearance and close to that in size.

Buy a book on Confederate currency for comparison of the real, fake and commercial stuff.

HELLBILLY
March 01, 2007, 22:01
Thank you for the information.

DABTL
March 01, 2007, 22:04
Originally posted by HELLBILLY
Thank you for the information.

No problem. I have an extensive collection of Confederate currency and bonds.

Big Johnson
March 01, 2007, 22:16
Just a reminder -

Since the Union won the war, those Confederate bills are worthless....

Don't try to pass them off as Federal Reserve Notes or any such non-sence

Para Driver
March 01, 2007, 22:20
they might become legal tender again if Hillary Wins....

Dean P
March 01, 2007, 22:38
Just a reminder -

Since the Union won the war, those Confederate bills are worthless....

Don't try to pass them off as Federal Reserve Notes or any such non-sence


I don't believe this, nope not me. How in the hell do you know? Did someone tell you ? Or did you read it somewhere on the inter-net?

DABTL
March 02, 2007, 08:10
Originally posted by Big Johnson
Just a reminder -

Since the Union won the war, those Confederate bills are worthless....

Don't try to pass them off as Federal Reserve Notes or any such non-sence

The last trading of Confederate notes and bonds occurred in London in 1883. They traded at $.03 per $100 face value. There were safe holding companies in London collecting Confederate notes and bonds promising to redeem them from the States.

Judah P. Benjamin, former Secretary of State of the Confederate States of America, fled to England becoming a prominent attorney. He spent the remainder of his life explaining that the fourth clause of the 14th Amendment voided the obligation of the States represented by the notes and bonds. Prior to the adoption of that Amendment, the notes and bonds were valid obligations of the States involved.

Much like the alleged end of Reconstruction was touted as a political triumph, the passage of the Fourteenth Amendment was welcomed by the participating former Confederate States as a way of dodging enormous debt, but still be claimed as the work of scalawags and carpet baggers for political cover.

Curiously, the bonds and notes held by the safe holding companies survived the Blitz and came to Dallas, Texas, in the early 1980's. I helped sort the last trove of 20,000 pieces. The bonds had unheard of interest rates for the times. Eight per cent.
:rolleyes:

owlcreekok
March 02, 2007, 08:21
Thanks for that gem of information. This will be a good day, having learned something so early.

Yes, the Union won the war. The fitness of their prize is proving quite fitting of the deeds.