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View Full Version : I have corrosion in my bbls. since I started using S. AF. ammo...


Bubba
August 12, 2001, 12:50
It's down near the chamber. Is that ammo corrosive, or is it this humidity increasing the speed if oxidation?
My perfect FAL is less.

EMDII
August 12, 2001, 13:29
How and When do you clean the rifle? Immdediately after firing? Do you lightlube the bore/barrel after cleaning?

I'd expect to see some throat erosion and barrel pitting from corrosive ammunition.

Bubba
August 12, 2001, 13:52
I'll admit I let the rifles sit around a few weeks before cleaning once. I noticed rust and since then I don't do that anymore. I clean within two days of firing. Hoppes #9, brush, Hoppes#9, dry swab, light lube, then dry swab at the time of firing again. I've shot Cavim and a few other FMJs, but I've never had corrosion 'till now.

Damn, My perfect STG bbls are screwed! :mad:

W.E.G.
August 12, 2001, 13:59
I appreciate your chagrin at discovering corrosion in your barrel. If it helps, I doubt that the corrosion will have a noticeable effect on accuracy. I've seen some real sewer-pipes shoot some amazing groups.

BTW, if you are using corrosive ammo, ordinary cleaning solvents WILL NOT prevent corrosion. YOU MUST use ammonia to neutralize the effects of corrosive ammo.

Here's how to clean up:
1) 10-12 swipes through the bore with bronze brush.
2) Clean bore, breech and action using patches and a 50%-50% ammonia and water solution (Hot is probably better, but cool works fine.) A turkey baster make a good injector for this concoction.
3) dry everything with dry patches
4) Clean per normal with Hoppes, Outers, CLP, whatever.
5) Lubricate per normal

NEVER let firearm sit for more than 24 hours without cleaning after using corrosive ammo. (After 24hrs it's too easy to forget and just let the salt sit there and chew into things.)

NC Rifleman
August 12, 2001, 14:12
I picked up a case of SA R1M1 ball in a 1260rd metal case/140rd battle packs. Is this the same stuff you're shootin? I haven't gotten around to shooting any of mine yet so I can't comment on whether or not it's corrosive, but there's a sticker on the case saying non corrosive berdan primers.

Richard Bird
August 12, 2001, 14:14
Was this ammo in battle packs or boxes?

Bubba
August 12, 2001, 15:26
This is the 140rnd Battle Pack ammo.

I'm not saying that this stuff Is, It may be the humidity where I live. I live in an old farm house, no A/C. I dunno.

usmc326
August 12, 2001, 16:06
You can determine if it's corrosive by
pulling the bullet from a round, toss the powder, then chamber & shoot the
primered case at a piece of bare steel
(sand a spot) from a close distance, then wait a few days.
If the steel is starting to rust and/or corrode then the ammo is corrosive. Ammonia, or that foul smelling GI surplus bore cleaner works. Any weapon using corrosive ammo is supposed to be cleaned everyday for three days. I've found that a second time after two days is fine.

WJ-Polish Guy
August 12, 2001, 17:18
Two additions to previous posts:

You want to use HOT water, so barrel and other parts get hot too. That way any water left from cleaning will evaparate, instead of corroding a metal

If you decide to test for corrosivnes by shooting primer, make sure you have two metal plates, one recive "primer treatment' other not, that way you have something to compare... Corrosion with or w/o salts, as regular steel exposed to elements will most likely to corrode to same degree. Especialy now with sky high humid....

gunhead
August 12, 2001, 22:06
Originally posted by usmc326:
[QB]or that foul smelling GI surplus bore cleaner works. QB]

This Sounds like the easiest way to go
:)
A Lot less BS, but is doing just this enough?
All my newer ammo is NC but I bought 450 rds of corrosive Yugo 8mm for my FN-49 and its got me concerned, but overly concerned, dunno!

W.E.G.
August 12, 2001, 22:26
One more issue from WJPG's post. You probably should thoroughy clean between primer-shots for the primer test. Otherwise your test may be affected by cross-contamination of samples.

If you fire one round of corrosive primer, surely some of the corrosive compound will remain in the barrel. The next round fired, even if non-corrosive, will expel some of the contaminants from the prior round(s). So, basically, you won't be able to tell shit from shinola in this sort of test unless you clean THOROUGHLY between test-shots.

xcpd69
August 12, 2001, 22:57
Originally posted by gary.jeter:
<STRONG>If you fire one round of corrosive primer, surely some of the corrosive compound will remain in the barrel. The next round fired, even if non-corrosive, will expel some of the contaminants from the prior round(s). So, basically, you won't be able to tell shit from shinola in this sort of test unless you clean THOROUGHLY between test-shots.</STRONG>

Simple. Shoot the non-corrosive primer first. Then the corrosive one. Then you only have to clean the weapon once.

I'm a lazy(efficent?)Bastard...

Moose
August 12, 2001, 23:16
;) Say, I just take a bottle of Windex spray it on a patch and clean the bore and the bolt.
Then clean the barrel as usual The Windex already has Ammonia in it. Has always worked for me.

Moose
August 12, 2001, 23:20
;) Say, I just take a bottle of Windex spray it on a patch and clean the bore and the bolt.
Then clean the barrel as usual The Windex already has Ammonia in it. Has always worked for me.

usmc326
August 13, 2001, 00:08
Originally posted by Moose:
<STRONG> ;) Say, I just take a bottle of Windex spray it on a patch and clean the bore and the bolt.
Then clean the barrel as usual The Windex already has Ammonia in it. Has always worked for me.</STRONG>

On a semi-auto rifle the bore & bolt isn't sufficient, the gas piston & gas
tube need to be cleaned: follow the path of the gas. I've seen Chinese AK
& SKS gas pistons pitted after the owner didn't clean it for a week. I always check the piston first, as most people will swab the bore, unaware of the gas system.
Corrosive ammo might be the only ammo
available in a caliber; or, is priced so low that you can't pass it up. The U.S. military used corrosive ammo up until the late 50's. As long as you clean the firearm within 6-8 hrs. you'll be okay. If you're burned out from the sun, at least run a wet patch with GI bore cleaner through the bore & gas system before you go to bed.
All of the early imported 7.62x39 was
corrosive, as is the E.German ammo, &
most Turkish ammo.
Corrosive residue attracts water like a sponge, so you'll get rust too.

[ August 13, 2001: Message edited by: usmc326 ]

Gecko
August 13, 2001, 07:08
I've been shooting the SA ammo in the 140 battle packs for over a year, exclusively. I shoot the 5.56 & 7.62 in both my FAL and AR10. I have never noticed this problem. However, I do clean the same day I return from the range and do us an ammonia based solvet as part of my cleaning process.