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Old March 15, 2017, 12:20   #101
Watch Ryder
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Getting the first set of primary joists into place was a feat, but I had to repeat the work twice more before I could move on.

I use a carpenters level once more to get the first pair aligned properly with the next post 'in'.

Finally a combination level or carpenters square is used for getting the mark along the post, around the post for the next duo to be 'in-line' so to speak.

This video explains that part in a bit more detail:



A mallet is sometimes needed to tap-tap the joists into position...



I make the same move again but this time there is no middle post, I'll have to reinforce these primary joists with logs and slab rock underneath it:



As you can see also, the secondary joists (stringers?) are shown, these are suspended by joist hangers which are nailed into place. Doing these by myself is a bit tricky though. One handed I have to get the level of the hanger it sits on at the right level...

But that is for another databurst, in future times...
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Old March 17, 2017, 18:46   #102
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The summer days are fun times for these guys, but maybe not for my logs.



The carpenter ants are out and about! They scamper across my elevated logs from the last year like highway things. I follow them to their source and find they only bother the ground logs that are rotting away anyway (I use them to keep the building logs rot-free).

The mold has set in a bit though, but the linseed oil I applied last year means it peels off pretty easily.
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Old March 17, 2017, 18:48   #103
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There may be bandwidth issues on my image hosting account so if the pictures are blank the bandwidth is low, I think it resets every month though at least.

Back to the construction. In the midst of the floor project the rainfall factor presented itself.

Watching the drip-drip from the roof onto the ground nearby only strengthened my resolve to get the drainage taken care off.

Gutters were one option, but I always had a yearning for French Drains. It's something often used for underground shelters/cabins yet is pretty old-school too.
Getting my waterproofs on and my spade and bucket, I got to work!

Digging the trench with a bed of gravel:



Perferorated pipe going in!



Tunneling through the roots here:



Adding the membrane and burying it, inspection pipe optional.



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Old March 19, 2017, 21:53   #104
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Thumbs up

The order of what takes place next important too.

The floor should be sealed in as you go along installing the secondary joists. Failing to do this will mean tunnel rat time for the entire underside. That's not too bad with a decent void or undercroft, but for only about 1' it's a real PITA.

After the first set of secondary joists were installed, tar-paper membrane hammered in I made sure to do it right for the second set.



The insulation is the pink panther stuff. R30 AFAIR.

Second set of joists now down, just needs some more pink panther treatment:



The insulation was quite bulky and it took TWO large packs of the stuff to get the floor sections filled.



Now though the pine plywood was going to go on top, I opted for the thickest stuff I could afford.

The first 4x8 sheets went down nicely in the middle area.



That was the easy-part, for EVERY other section it was a custom fit!



This really took all my skill, bloody-minded attributes and knowhow. I used a skillsaw for the big cuts and a jigsaw for the curved and semi-circular parts.

I had a joist or two that had 'crowned' up slightly too, so that had to be chased out with a wood chisel to bring to an appropriate level.

But after several weeks of toing and froing to a workshop with power and extra tools, my floor was in place!

Getting a puzzle-piece ready for fitting:







Concluding video showing the floor being put into place.

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Old March 20, 2017, 11:47   #105
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Using a portapotty under the sky gets old after a while, especially in the bad weather.

Got the outhouse built over the course of two days:





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Old March 20, 2017, 12:43   #106
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Would that be a composting toilet or chemical type? Sure looks like a deep squat is required. I'd get it up a ways.

Enjoy your new found privacy. The chipmunks are probably grateful.
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Old March 20, 2017, 16:01   #107
John A
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Yeah, that's definitely not how we did it.

We'd dig a big hole, about 3 feet deep. Deeper if you wanted. Before building, keep a journal for a few days to see which direction the wind normally blew so you know where to put it.

Build a little house above it like you did, light enough it could be pulled and moved it you ever need to clean it or move it if you ever fill it up.

Cut a hole out in the floor, and build up a seat comfortable enough that all you have to do it sit down comfortably.

Also, our old outhouse was high society. It was a double seater.
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Old March 20, 2017, 21:55   #108
Watch Ryder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John A View Post
Yeah, that's definitely not how we did it.

We'd dig a big hole, about 3 feet deep. Deeper if you wanted. Before building, keep a journal for a few days to see which direction the wind normally blew so you know where to put it.

Build a little house above it like you did, light enough it could be pulled and moved it you ever need to clean it or move it if you ever fill it up.

Cut a hole out in the floor, and build up a seat comfortable enough that all you have to do it sit down comfortably.

Also, our old outhouse was high society. It was a double seater.
I don't like that sort of outhouse, too much of a PITA and is an insect zone. A neighbor nearby did it that way. Massive hole, nice outhouse on top, but not what I prefer. I use a composting bucket underneath the actual toilet seat chair. Off to the dumping area later where a hole is dug and in it goes with helpings of sawdust on top.

The outhouse isn't finished in those pictures either, I've a door to add etc.

Here's how we got a hole-type outhouse taken care of in the Mountain Hold place my buddy lives at...


Last edited by Watch Ryder; March 20, 2017 at 22:09.
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Old March 20, 2017, 22:07   #109
Watch Ryder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gordonm1 View Post
Would that be a composting toilet or chemical type? Sure looks like a deep squat is required. I'd get it up a ways.

Enjoy your new found privacy. The chipmunks are probably grateful.
I've got both, although the chemical toilets are useless in winter, even with antifreeze added. The primary use now is composting type.
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Old March 20, 2017, 22:23   #110
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Putting it together:



Here's the chair-seat in place.



I cut the legs down a few inches and have it just right.
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Old March 22, 2017, 08:40   #111
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It's time to mount up the solar panels!

You may recall that these up until now have been laying on the floor, getting what they can for my battery system.

To get them onto the roof properly requires some prep-work.

Some OSB 4x8s were cut into two halves, then I added a section to each to bring the length out to about nine feet long!

Then on top of each of the two sections I unrolled a nine foot length of galvanized steel flashing, which was screwed down onto the OSB

Here's the panel getting prepped for stick-down onto the galvanized metal surface:



Getting it stuck down wasn't easy:



I had to pre-roll it out before unsticking it from the backing. That way I knew it was going to unroll straight and perpendicular.



But stick it down I did, and soon it was time to mount the spars to the roof (I used weatherban to keep it from leaking in) and hoist the panels up!





Video Commlink established!









That's the panels up and mounted!



Power flows into the charge controller like never before and it's all internal too. Now more traipsing about to the power tent.
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Old March 22, 2017, 09:38   #112
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What's the power rating of those panels?

A lot of tech goes into the newer (flexible) stuff. And was surprisingly efficient from what I have seen.

There was a segment a while back on a show I was watching that have a lot of military contracts powerful enough to keep several pieces of gear running.
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Old March 22, 2017, 10:14   #113
Watch Ryder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John A View Post
What's the power rating of those panels?

A lot of tech goes into the newer (flexible) stuff. And was surprisingly efficient from what I have seen.

There was a segment a while back on a show I was watching that have a lot of military contracts powerful enough to keep several pieces of gear running.
About 68 Watts or so a piece.

Imported to the UK from USA. Bought them in the UK, traveled with them to Ireland. Bundled them up in my baggage back to the USA where they now live.

Here's some of their adventures in Ireland...

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