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Old September 26, 2018, 16:37   #1
Elwarpo
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Folded slide 226

Just picked up a used P226 and was surprised to see a separate block. Looked into it more and it is a folded carbon steel slide, not the stainless machined slide I was expecting. Kind of cool though. Anyone know when they switched? Also will a set work on it?
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Old September 26, 2018, 17:31   #2
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I have an early 1986 made P226 which has the folded steel slide and the machined breech block. In 1995 I purchased two new Sig pistols. A P220 .45 ACP and a P229 .357 Sig. The P220 was all German made with triple serial numbers and has the folded steel slide. The P229 has a German made frame and a US made forged and machined slide made of stainless steel.

Sig introduced the P229 in 1993 chambered for the .40 S&W and it was the first Sig to have the stainless machined slide. From that point on all American made slides for the P series were machined from a stainless forging. I don't know exactly when Sig dropped the folded slides from production. I think it was in the early 2000's but I could be wrong about that.

I have a P226 with a German made frame and a US made slide machined from an aluminum forging. It is chambered for the .22 LR cartridge. The frame can be fitted with the folded slide from the 1986 P226.

As I understand it, most if not all Sig production is now done at the Exeter, New Hampshire factory. A shame in my opinion. I treasure my all German made Sig's with triple serial numbers.

I do have one other Sig with triple serial numbers. A P210-6 made at the Neuhausen factory in Switzerland.

And so it goes.


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Old September 28, 2018, 08:52   #3
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Thanks, just find it interesting, BTW it is a tack driver considering how used it is.
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Old September 28, 2018, 23:37   #4
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I have never owned a Sig pistol that wasn't capable of putting all of its rounds into a three inch group at 25 yards with good quality factory ammo or my hand loads.

Much is made of the fact that the 9mm Luger is not a target cartridge. I will agree with this to a point. The .38 Special and .45 ACP were developed as police and military cartridges. Over the years they were developed into match grade rounds by first the hand loading clan and then the factories.

If you could see the paper target that came with my P210-6 made in 1996 you would think that the 9mm ammo was match grade. Not so. It was Swiss made Pist Par 41 which is the Swiss service round.

And so it goes,


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Old September 30, 2018, 10:54   #5
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While the 226 is very accurate, My 229 in .40 and 220 in 10mm are more accurate.The only sig I have owned that was not very accurate was a 250, but at that price point I did not expect much.
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Old October 01, 2018, 18:14   #6
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1996 was the last year of general production sheet metal slides. All general US production slides were solid milled units from what I'm told. I've got a 1996 P226 that is the folded slide, former police duty gun. Runs perfectly. Love me some classic Sig Sauers.
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Old October 02, 2018, 09:03   #7
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Is it me, or do the classic P series just feel better.
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Old October 02, 2018, 15:21   #8
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That is a difficult question to answer. It all depends on the shooter and which Sig he/she is holding.

My P220 .45 and P226 9mm feel "just right" when I shoot them. But when I am cranking off .357 Sig rounds in the milled slide P229 I appreciate the extra weight. It helps control the recoil and it just feels right to me. The alloy frame and slide .22LR P226 feels kind of weird due to its light weight and lack of recoil.

And so it goes.


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