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Old September 08, 2015, 20:56   #51
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One more for tonight boys.

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Old September 08, 2015, 21:15   #52
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English Town & Country!

This is from the early 80's UK. The Sound.
Saw them many times, fantastic live, and over the years have become quite special to me. Sadly, Adrian Borland (singer /guitar) due to his principles... he never saw eye to eye with the record companies(never sold out). Produced the first self published punk album under the name "the Outsiders" entitled "Propaganda", if I recall. He jumped in front of a Tube train one night, after work - sad really(1999). Turns out he was quite influential, he just never knew it.:big angel:
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Old September 08, 2015, 22:45   #53
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I have always been Music--WIERD--!!
As In almost None of the music on the radio Is even tollerable to me!

Yeaa the occasional country tune is fun But almost NO classic rock [Boston-journey-styx-aerosmith] etc.. I like early Genesis and Moody Blues though ! Van Halen and one of two motly crew do it for me !

I seem to be heavy into Girls generation and several other K-POP girl groups The music is listenable and the babes are very watchable !


Ivan Torrent and two steps from hell along with Impetus

Vanessa Mae is Just wonderful and Im In Love [or Lust]


Julie Elven and Merethe Soltvedt have killer voices ! Like I said -- Im into strange stuff you have probably never heard of !








SOO Young of the Girls generation -8 other gals in the group [i like this pic,]



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Old September 09, 2015, 12:19   #54
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Just saw this weird thing today. Reminded me of when music vids were fun.


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Old September 09, 2015, 21:43   #55
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The late, great Levon Helm:

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Old September 09, 2015, 21:49   #56
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Lucinda Williams wrote this about Austin songwriter/singer Blaze Foley. He was killed while protecting an elderly friend in an argument.

http://www.austinchronicle.com/music/1999-12-24/75224/



Damn. I love Lucinda.
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Old September 10, 2015, 18:50   #57
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I don't think they've toned it down I think they're showing a little more range.....
That's a a better way of putting it. I agree.
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Old September 10, 2015, 19:18   #58
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Jason Eady. My fav line in this song..."I miss the days when the women were ugly and the men were all 40 years old..."






And his missus, Courtney Patton. Beatuful voice and woman.





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Old September 10, 2015, 19:41   #59
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The Trishas. They were up and coming on strong until one of the gals had to take a break to fulfill some obligations. They might be back together soon.

This one kicks into gear around 1:20.



Love the chorus at 1:00 and the a capella later.



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Old September 10, 2015, 19:43   #60
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I'm really digging the Carolina Chocolate Drops. I'm a sucker for the fiddle.
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Old September 10, 2015, 20:22   #61
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I'm really digging the Carolina Chocolate Drops. I'm a sucker for the fiddle.
The Giddens Sisters, of which Rhionnon Giddens of the Carolina Chocolate Drops is one, have a great disc out called "I Know I've Been Changed". Really good old-time music.

If you like fiddle, some of the best of traditional fiddle music is "Texas Fiddle". Major Franklin, Benny Thomason, Eck Robertson, Norman Solomon, and others. Here's a link to Benny doing "Billy In The Lowground": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDkWXrII8F0

Benny Thomasson was a huge influence on Mark O'Connor. By the nineteen eighties, if you wanted to be a national fiddle champion, you had to know the intricacies of the Texas style and be able to perform at Bluegrass speed. It's great stuff!
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Old September 10, 2015, 20:28   #62
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The Giddens Sisters, of which Rhionnon Giddens of the Carolina Chocolate Drops is one, have a great disc out called "I Know I've Been Changed". Really good old-time music.

If you like fiddle, some of the best of traditional fiddle music is "Texas Fiddle". Major Franklin, Benny Thomason, Eck Robertson, Norman Solomon, and others. Here's a link to Benny doing "Billy In The Lowground": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDkWXrII8F0

Benny Thomasson was a huge influence on Mark O'Connor. By the nineteen eighties, if you wanted to be a national fiddle champion, you had to know the intricacies of the Texas style and be able to perform at Bluegrass speed. It's great stuff!
Hot damn Arby!! That's some good stuff man. I nominate this thread for Coolest of the Year!

Here we go:



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Old September 10, 2015, 20:55   #63
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One from the wayback machine.

Southern Culture on the Skids-Roadside Wreck



Every dead thing needs a hole!
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Old September 10, 2015, 21:02   #64
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A more recent performance.

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Old September 10, 2015, 21:05   #65
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Tex,

Doc Roberts was good, but he was from Kentucky. The Texas fiddlers were of an entirely different breed. The Texas style (or, fairly, Texas-Oklahoma style) was far, far more ornate than southeastern or Piedmont fiddling. I'm not dissing any other regional style, but Texas fiddling has been singularly unique since Eck Robertson first recorded his version of "Sally Goodin" in the 1920s, and no doubt, long before.

It took guys like Howdy Forrester (who played with Bill Monroe in the early forties) to bring attention to the Texas/Oklahoma style of fiddling. He noted that those rural SW fiddlers routinely played in the third position with not an apparent thought as to the complexity demanded of the style, and had more variations on tunes than most other fiddlers could otherwise imagine.

Dave Freeman of County Records recorded some phenomenal Texas fiddlers back in the sixties. Those recordings became standards for future generations of contest fiddlers. Richly lyrical "folk" fiddle styles.

It's a shame that so few give a shit about that art anymore, at least as far as "pop" culture is concerned, or ever was.

It's damn good stuff!
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Old September 10, 2015, 21:55   #66
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Tex,

Doc Roberts was good, but he was from Kentucky. The Texas fiddlers were of an entirely different breed. The Texas style (or, fairly, Texas-Oklahoma style) was far, far more ornate than southeastern or Piedmont fiddling. I'm not dissing any other regional style, but Texas fiddling has been singularly unique since Eck Robertson first recorded his version of "Sally Goodin" in the 1920s, and no doubt, long before.

It took guys like Howdy Forrester (who played with Bill Monroe in the early forties) to bring attention to the Texas/Oklahoma style of fiddling. He noted that those rural SW fiddlers routinely played in the third position with not an apparent thought as to the complexity demanded of the style, and had more variations on tunes than most other fiddlers could otherwise imagine.

Dave Freeman of County Records recorded some phenomenal Texas fiddlers back in the sixties. Those recordings became standards for future generations of contest fiddlers. Richly lyrical "folk" fiddle styles.

It's a shame that so few give a shit about that art anymore, at least as far as "pop" culture is concerned, or ever was.

It's damn good stuff!
Man Arby, you know your stuff! That is fascinating to me brother. I have an old 78 of "Carrol County Blues" around here somewhere. My grandfather on Dad's side loved that tune; main reason I looked it up I guess.

Did these seminal Texas fiddlers influence people like Bob Wills who came along just a bit later? I love this music. I could give f*ck-all about 99% of what passes for "music" these days. Thanks for schoolin' me! Hey, How about a lil' Bob Wills? He's hard to beat, "The King of Western Swing"!



"Osage Stomp" was the first recording Bob and the Texas Playboys did for Columbia. It was recorded in Dallas on Sept. 23, 1935. In Robert R. Townsend's great biography "San Antonio Rose", he describes the sessions. They had tubs of ice in front of fans blowing on the wax masters to keep them from melting. Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys played their first Saturday night dance, after leaving Pappy Lee O'Daniels employ (as the "Light Crust Doughboys, a nod to the sponsor of their radio show, Burris Flour Mills) in my hometown, Cameron, Texas. All that is detailed in Townsend's book.

I've read that Bob would tour California during WWII, playing dances attended by all the defense plant workers out there. Imagine 4-5,000 couples dancing to that incredible band! When they played Kansas City, the members of Count Basie's band would attend their shows. At their peak, Wills and the Playboys could play anything and were probably the most well-rounded band in America. Here's a taste of their big-band style:



Damn, I could do this all night! Sorry if I get carried away!
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Old September 10, 2015, 22:12   #67
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The Giddens Sisters, of which Rhionnon Giddens of the Carolina Chocolate Drops is one, have a great disc out called "I Know I've Been Changed". Really good old-time music.

If you like fiddle, some of the best of traditional fiddle music is "Texas Fiddle". Major Franklin, Benny Thomason, Eck Robertson, Norman Solomon, and others. Here's a link to Benny doing "Billy In The Lowground": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDkWXrII8F0

Benny Thomasson was a huge influence on Mark O'Connor. By the nineteen eighties, if you wanted to be a national fiddle champion, you had to know the intricacies of the Texas style and be able to perform at Bluegrass speed. It's great stuff!
Looks like I've got some homework to do! Thanks for chiming in, Arby.

Interesting stuff with the rural guys you mentioned. Reminds me of the more recent Varise Conner offering by Louisiana Folkways. He was playing what sounded like Hank Williams tune by a different name. He said he got some of those tunes from famous guys passing through.

"Boy, there's a lot of music in this old fiddle. If only I could make it come out. It's not the fiddle, it's me. You've got to raise a head of steam to play music, and it takes a long time to raise steam in an old, rusty boiler."

Thanks again, Arby.

And Randy... going to have to check mout that K-POP some time. That first image was horribly photoshop'd!
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Old September 10, 2015, 23:04   #68
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The Texas Songster

I saw Mance Lipscomb twice at private parties here in Cameron. He played at the request of a local dentist, Dr. George Bowman, who had made his dentures. He was "discovered" late in life. A contemporary of many of the legendary country bluesmen of the early 20th century, his guitar technique was impeccable. He called himself a "songster" and his repertory encompassed so many styles other than the blues. I asked him about Lightnin' Hopkins at one of the parties. He laughed and said, "Now Lightnin', he would play a little piano with me but wouldn't play his guitar." "Why not?", I asked. Mance looked me in the eye and replied, "Man, he didn't want his haid cut!" And that was true, Lightnin's guitar work couldn't hold a candle to Mance. That was just a couple years before his death. One can only imagine the licks he had as a young player! A couple of my guitar-playing friends sat in with him for a few songs one of those nights. That was quite a thrill for all of us.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mance_Lipscomb







An oral interview by Dr. George Bowman of Cameron:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPqq7hU4IX4

A Guide to the George Bowman Collection on Mance Lipscomb, 1961-2000:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/utcah...cah-00624.html
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Old September 11, 2015, 07:03   #69
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...Reminds me of the more recent Varise Conner offering by Louisiana Folkways....
I heard Varise play back in the eighties, at his house. I went there with a friend of mine who was a fiddler. He was a doddering old man at the time. I was afraid to hear him drag a bow across the strings. When he did, his noting was perfect! I was highly impressed, to say the least. Everybody used to say of him: "He knows tunes that nobody else knows!" I heard some standard American fiddling in his playing, and I guess he learned some phrasings that other Cajun fiddlers had never heard. It was said that when the railroad went through Lake Arthur he would go down to the tracks and listen to the railroad workers play music in the evening, after work was done. That may be where he first heard some of the technique that made him unique among Cajun fiddlers.

I did get to hear Lightning Hopkins play live but not Mance Lipscomb. There's a warmth to Mance's playing and singing that is reminiscent of John Hurt.

We finally have a western swing band in my town and it is great! Love that stuff!
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Old September 11, 2015, 18:07   #70
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I heard Varise play back in the eighties, at his house....
WOW. I sure would have loved to have been there.

Thart made me think... you know, I believe my appreciation for Folk, Americana, etc. began with the music of the Ken Burns PBS Civil War documentary. I was barely a teenager, but it stuck deep.

I participate in Sacred Harp from time to time--one of those Stuck Deep moments came in the shape note song from the movie Cold Mountain. I was floored to learn it's still around. I'll have to post up some of my amateur recordings.

For now... some more of the good stuff.

Del Barber.



Wood & Wire



Howlin' Brothers

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Old September 11, 2015, 19:23   #71
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How could I overlook this? Post WWII, my dad came home from Europe and received his discharge from the U.S. Army (87th Infantry) at 22. He met my mom, a 15 year-old daughter of Tom Harris, former boot-legger, cock-fighter, bar owner and tough ol' SOB. Soon my dad, Johnny, had a job in Freeport, Texas at a DOW Chemical plant. He was courting my mom, having first seen her in Tom's beer joint. He would ride the bus back to Cameron for the weekend and take an overnight bus back to Freeport on Sunday night. This song was hot at the time, and Johnny thought it sounded like the singer was saying " my pretty Jo"; mom's name was Billie Jo. It became" their song". I heard it from as far back as I can remember. Supposedly, Harry Choates never even owned his own fiddle. This is the original version of a song that's been recorded by so many artists:




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Choates
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Old September 11, 2015, 21:31   #72
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WOW. I sure would have loved to have been there.
One of the most remarkable aspects of being in Varise's home that afternoon and evening, besides the music, was the way his family treated everyone. There were a number of other musicians and folklorists there that day. I don't know if it was Varise's daughter or granddaughter, but she had cooked a huge amount of gumbo and offered it to everyone there. "Are you hungry, chere? Here, have some gumbo!" Everyone there was treated like a neighbor, even though some of us were complete strangers. I felt like an interloper, but was treated like I was a personal friend. Remarkable people.

I found the same attitude was apparent among other groups of traditional musicians and their supporters. I met Ralph Stanley at a festival, and Earl Scruggs at a concert, as well as others under various circumstances. Those musicians would treat total strangers with respect. I think they felt that fans that came up to greet them were not just people that had heard their names or bought one album, but people who had bought every album of theirs that they could find (this all prior to the internet, amazon, etc., when some of that music was not that easy to find). They were grateful to their fans because they knew that those fans provided them with their livelihood. Earl Scruggs was singularly remarkable in this regard, and the stories of his graciousness and patience with fans is legion. He is but one example.

Some of these musicians are iconic and historically HUGE within their respective musical genres, but could be incredibly gracious when being beset by fans (like me) who wanted to be flattered by getting a little bit of attention from the masters. Zero arrogance and egos from some of the greatest practitioners of their respective musical arts.

Texgunner, I would be interested to know how your experiences in hearing Mance Lipscomb in small group settings echoes my experiences with some of the above musicians.

With all the execrable babble and bullshit that is being marketed as the zenith of contemporary musical "art" these days, it sure is nice to turn back to the sounds of old-time, swing, bluegrass, blues, old-time, jazz, Cajun, and other older styles of sounds treasured by so many of those who have gone before us.
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Old September 11, 2015, 22:35   #73
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Arby, Mance was just a really friendly old gentleman. The setting couldn't have been more relaxed and intimate. Dr. Bowman had converted a stand-alone garage into a space his family called "New Orleans". My friends and I were able to visit with Mance, ask any questions of him that he wanted and basically mingle with this incredibly interesting "bit" of living history. He told many stories about celebrities he had met, and places he had performed. Here's a pic taken at one of those parties. Mance had been driven to Cameron by a driver, a young black guy, who might've been a relative but I'm not certain.



My friend Dennis, an estimable guitarist in his own right, has another pic of he and Mance playing together. My guitar playing friends were just amazed that Mance had only a cheap guitar, and not a Martin or Gibson like they had. I remember him fishing a pocketknife out for a slide and how it seemed it just "sing" and "whine" across those steel strings. Again, it was a case of the Indian, not the arrow.

Dr. Bowman was a somewhat colorful character (a huge understatement ) and a bit of a lech. He kept prodding Mance to sing a certain song but Mance kept putting him off, saying "Now Doc, they's ladies here and I don't want to sing that." Finally he relented and started the song. At the line, "brother's in the front yard pickin' up sticks, sister's in the backyard...", Doc intervened, practically shouting "sucking a d*ck!" Mance immediately stopped playing and one could tell that his dignity was a bit offended. I will never forget how chagrined he seemed and embarrassed by Dr. Bowman's churlish, drunken behavior.

I felt so lucky to be in attendance at those parties, and as the years have passed, I realized that I had been in the presence of greatness, and a living connection to music and genres stretching back maybe a hundred years and more. Mance just acted like he was at home for one those "Saturday Night Suppers" he had hosted and played at for his whole life.
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Old September 11, 2015, 22:55   #74
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I felt so lucky to be in attendance at those parties, and as the years have passed, I realized that I had been in the presence of greatness, and a living connection to music and genres stretching back maybe a hundred years and more. Mance just acted like he was at home for one those "Saturday Night Suppers" he had hosted and played at for his whole life.
That is so F'N cool! When I lived in Austin I had a friend that went up to Navasota to pick with Mance on occasion but I was too much of a dumbass to make the trip back then. It was Chris Strachwitz that first recorded Mance for Chris' Arhoolie records label in 1960. Chris wanted to look up the guy (Mance) that had helped bring "Tom Moore's Blues" to national attention (Hopkins had helped popularize the song).

As you pointed out, Tex, Mance was a "songster" much more than he was a bluesman. He knew a lot more than just blues. "Blues" was a genre that was narrowed in specificity by record company A&R men back in the thirties, for marketing purposes. Even the legendary Robert Johnson played a lot of non-blues material. FWIW, It is said that Johnson had a great version of "Tumbling Tumbleweeds.

Anyone here who has never heard of Mance Lipscomb should check out your links. Thanks for the posts, Tex!
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Old September 11, 2015, 23:12   #75
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You're quite welcome Arby! It's my pleasure I assure you. Say, about when were you in Austin? I lived there in 1973 and again in '75, and of course, wasted many a brain-cell during my squandered youth in those daze.

It seems that you just missed meeting Mance yourself. At the time, you couldn't have known that those opportunities were so fleeting. I have several Mance LPs and just today shopped around on Amazon for some CDs. It is true that Mance and his contemporaries, no matter where they lived, were true musicians who did cater to their audience's varied tastes. Their repertoires spanned almost genre of popular music. I'm always kinda amazed every time I hear Robert Johnson's "Hot Tamales (They're Red Hot)". Honestly, Johnson is my favorite of the old bluesmen. His catalog of what, 25 or 26 songs(?) is just essential music for me and I seldom go for long without soaking them up.





I think it is interesting that for both us, meeting great artists was so relaxed and welcoming. Those men didn't have a pretentious bone in their bodies did they?
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Old September 12, 2015, 00:01   #76
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You're quite welcome Arby! Say, about when were you in Austin?
On and off from '68 to '74, and then '80-81.

I heard Lightning, Big Joe Williams, and a number of other blues and other Texas musicians during those years.

Robert Johnson? His "Hot Tamales" (i.e., "They're Red Hot"), was derivative of a number of tunes recorded earlier by Memphis Minnie, Big Bill Broonzy, and Tampa Red. All of Johnson's music was derivative of previous recordings. It was what Johnson DID with those earlier recordings and how he reworked the melodies into his own tunes, and his phenomenal versatility into absorbing and replicating so many styles of playing that made him such an incomparable artist in American music. He was brilliant!

But getting back to Texas music which you brought to the fore in your posts, Tex, from Blind Willie Johnson and Blind Lemon Jefferson and Henry Thomas in the twenties, to T-Bone Walker and Bob Wills in the thirties, to Texas Alexander, Lightning Hopkins, and host of other artists in the forties, fifties, and sixties, (not to mention fiddlers like Major Franklin, Benny Thomason, Norman Solomon and others), there is an ENORMOUS amount of great music that was germinated in the Lone Star State that is all but ignored in the present, vapid, contempory times.

Nirvana for me will never be hearing Kurt Cobain hogging out chords and vocals, but more likely hearing Major Franklin high on the A & E strings voicing a marvelous shuffle on the "A" part of "Durang's Hornpipe". But that's just me.
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Old September 12, 2015, 07:53   #77
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Well all that was about the time I was born!

I was fortunate in that the men I was raised up around in my mom's church where true, good hearted, hard working men. They were older, not formerly struggling saints as I when knew them. I always value the hard-won wisdom, experience and decorum displayed by guys like this "Uncle Seymour Washington".

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Old September 12, 2015, 08:14   #78
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On and off from '68 to '74, and then '80-81.

I heard Lightning, Big Joe Williams, and a number of other blues and other Texas musicians during those years.

Robert Johnson? His "Hot Tamales" (i.e., "They're Red Hot"), was derivative of a number of tunes recorded earlier by Memphis Minnie, Big Bill Broonzy, and Tampa Red. All of Johnson's music was derivative of previous recordings. It was what Johnson DID with those earlier recordings and how he reworked the melodies into his own tunes, and his phenomenal versatility into absorbing and replicating so many styles of playing that made him such an incomparable artist in American music. He was brilliant!

But getting back to Texas music which you brought to the fore in your posts, Tex, from Blind Willie Johnson and Blind Lemon Jefferson and Henry Thomas in the twenties, to T-Bone Walker and Bob Wills in the thirties, to Texas Alexander, Lightning Hopkins, and host of other artists in the forties, fifties, and sixties, (not to mention fiddlers like Major Franklin, Benny Thomason, Norman Solomon and others), there is an ENORMOUS amount of great music that was germinated in the Lone Star State that is all but ignored in the present, vapid, contempory times.

Nirvana for me will never be hearing Kurt Cobain hogging out chords and vocals, but more likely hearing Major Franklin high on the A & E strings voicing a marvelous shuffle on the "A" part of "Durang's Hornpipe". But that's just me.
I just ordered a CD copy of Lightning Hopkins' "Autobiography in Blues" from Amazon yesterday. I bought the LP in 1969. It's just Lightning and his guitar, pure genius stuff to me. Back in the late '70s, I bought Tampa Red's "Guitar Wizard" compilation on the Bluebird label. Four sides of cool songs, my only complaint then was Tampa's insistence on playing kazoo on many tracks. For me anyway, the novelty wore off quickly. Now, much older and wiser, I can appreciate that idiosyncrasy a lot more. I wish I could find "Guitar Wizard" on CD now.

Fn, you are sure turning me onto some new artists too! Yes, I'm loving this thread to death. Long may it run!

Tampa Red:





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Old September 12, 2015, 15:39   #79
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Columbia has Tampa Red's "Guitar Wizard" CD. It has some great tracks, including some with "Georgia Tom" Dorsey on piano. But it sounds like your old Bluebird vinyl set probably had more tunes on it.
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Old September 13, 2015, 10:21   #80
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Thanks for the head's up Arby! I need to look for that. Woke up this morning and thought about the "Singing Brakeman". Do we have any Jimmie Rodgers fans? My mom and dad had about 7 or 8 Jimmie Rodgers LPs. Growing up, it seems like they were playing all the time. Of course, it wasn't long before I had learned all the lyrics and would sing and yodel along to them. Yeah, strange lil' kid I guess!

Between the Jimmie Rodger's albums and a copy of Ray Price's Greatest Hits (Columbia mono), I got a real appreciation for the roots of country music and great honky-tonk songs. Mom and dad were like a lot of young couples in the 50's and 60s, going out to dances and bars where I was immersed in this classic music.








And the incomparable Cherokee Cowboy himself, Ray Price:



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Old September 13, 2015, 14:41   #81
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Love old Jimmie Rodgers!

One of my all-time favorites of his is "Any Old Time".

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXBWoaRWHrM

The lyrics deal as much with contemporary heartache as they did with heartache in his day. The lyrics & melody stand the test of time quite well.

I'd like to throw in a plug for one of my all time favorite pickers: Doc Watson.

He could play Travis style, John Hurt, you name it. His flatpicking was unreal, especially for it's time. Here he is in 1966:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pceBvnkVWwk

He was a fine balladeer and old-time banjo player, too.
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Old September 14, 2015, 13:47   #82
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Old Crow Medicine Show

These guys are a hoot to watch live.

Since Tex introduced the Carolina Chocolate Drops, I now recognize one of the CCD members is a prison guard in the first video.

And a few other cameos by other artists in the 3rd video.





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Old September 15, 2015, 01:40   #83
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Old September 15, 2015, 02:01   #84
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Old September 15, 2015, 02:03   #85
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Harry Cooper was right!
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Old September 17, 2015, 17:22   #86
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I like it, OTk. Haven't heard those before.

Some Steeldrivers.

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Old September 17, 2015, 18:01   #87
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Steve Riley & The Mamou Playboys. I found them when looking for more swamp rock about 15yrs ago.




Hmmm, don't see Gros Jean on Youtube.
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Old September 19, 2015, 06:19   #88
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Let's get the weekend started off with something a little loud.

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Old September 19, 2015, 11:15   #89
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Steve Riley & The Mamou Playboys..
+ 1 on Steve & TMPBs!
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Old September 26, 2015, 19:06   #90
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Some Patrick Sweany for this eve.

Love this stuff when I've got a lot of physical work to do and can blast a jam. From the job site to cleaning the bathroom at home.



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Old September 26, 2015, 21:42   #91
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Okay. Best contemporary slide guitarist.

Sonny Landreth.

I've looked at the youtube videos of Sonny and none of them do him justice, IMHO. He pioneered a whole lot of melody work and harmonics "north of the slide". Years ago, Guitar Player magazine dubbed him the "Bayou Slide Genius".

If you ever have a chance to see him in a power trio format you'll definitely get the drift!
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Old October 02, 2015, 19:30   #92
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As slow as this page loads... I'm going to copy Arby's form and just post a link.

Love the harmony here with young Hannah/McEuen.
https://youtu.be/5nmmBV340jM?t=27s

Grace Potter, Nothing But The Water (I)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90A-spXBJXU

Hayden Triplets - Will You Miss Me
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7EHae6rG-4

The Be Good Tanyas - Dogsong (aka Sleep Dog Lullaby). When I'm in the mood for this song... well, I guess I'm part dog. This is one of my fav relaxation songs. I might assault y'all with my chill out music some time. It's, uh, varied.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=du3vV9CJf8g

In other news... I bout flipped the other day when I found Sandy Denny was the duet on Led Zepp's Battle of Evermore.
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Old October 02, 2015, 23:24   #93
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Great stuff, Fn/form!

I never got into the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band until they did that first triple "Will The Circle Be Unbroken" album in the early seventies. That was a fabulous effort that bridged generations.

I also like your posting of "Will You Miss Me". That was originally an old Carter Family recording. I first heard a version of it by Woody Guthrie and Cisco Houston. One of the nicest versions I have heard done was by the Red Clay Ramblers (It's on youtube, too).

Here's one from Allison Krauss:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWVtc3nO01A

It's not the album version but it is great. After my first wife died after a terrible struggle with cancer I'd listen to this song on my car tape deck. I'd be driving down the road damn near blinded by tears. This performance would really tear me up. It's beautiful. And redemptive.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Fn/form View Post
As slow as this page loads... I'm going to copy Arby's form and just post a link.

Love the harmony here with young Hannah/McEuen.
https://youtu.be/5nmmBV340jM?t=27s

Grace Potter, Nothing But The Water (I)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90A-spXBJXU

Hayden Triplets - Will You Miss Me
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7EHae6rG-4

The Be Good Tanyas - Dogsong (aka Sleep Dog Lullaby). When I'm in the mood for this song... well, I guess I'm part dog. This is one of my fav relaxation songs. I might assault y'all with my chill out music some time. It's, uh, varied.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=du3vV9CJf8g

In other news... I bout flipped the other day when I found Sandy Denny was the duet on Led Zepp's Battle of Evermore.
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Old October 03, 2015, 06:43   #94
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There are two NGDB albums that should be in any collection: Dirt, Silver & Gold and the first Will The Circle Be Unbroken collection. The latter is valuable just for the banter caught on tape before the songs.

Yeah, links are definitely better, especially since I'm usually posting from my phone! ;-)

https://youtu.be/BzO78hKSctQ
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Old October 03, 2015, 07:22   #95
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The NGDB stuff is so timely; last few days, the CD version of the original 3-LP set has been playing in my bedroom CD player. That is great old stuff. The first time I heard it was through some Bose 501s and it sounded so damned good.

Sandy Denny on the "Battle of Evermore" is just out of this world. That song caused me to seek out more from Fairport Convention too. Your comment reminded me of a teacher friend a few years ago. We were listening to the Rolling Stones' "Gimmie Shelter". He thought it was Grace Slick singing with Jagger. I had to show him the liner notes before he believed it was Merry Clayton. Damn, Grace Slick never sounded that good.
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Old October 03, 2015, 07:35   #96
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Great thread. Tagged for my future edification.
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Old October 03, 2015, 09:26   #97
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Great thread. Tagged for my future edification.
Post some stuff! I don't know about OP, but as far as I'm concerned doesn't have to be banjo/fiddle/steel guitar stuff, just cool music!

I liked this song when I first heard it, but love the video because it reminds me of that scene from Heat.

"Sit down...Ralph!"

https://youtu.be/UfB7jNSpDSk
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Old October 03, 2015, 12:46   #98
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Arby....... wow, what a chord to strike. My heart twists up with just the slightest hint of that soul deep, tragic intersection of personal and auditory emotion. Thank you for sharing with us.

ETA: More than once my mother has said she "likes to hear some of the newer takes on old songs". I love it when y'all point out the heritage and progression of the tunes and poetry.

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Old October 03, 2015, 13:06   #99
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This thread is for *any* music you may consider great and neglected. It doesn't matter which genre or language. Believe me, it's going to get weird.
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Old October 03, 2015, 13:32   #100
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Post some stuff! I don't know about OP, but as far as I'm concerned doesn't have to be banjo/fiddle/steel guitar stuff, just cool music!

I liked this song when I first heard it, but love the video because it reminds me of that scene from Heat.

"Sit down...Ralph!"

https://youtu.be/UfB7jNSpDSk
¡Rafael! ¡Siéntese!

Don't have much Spanish yet...

Julieta, pop music
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pj2ntDiXJCk

And an easter egg for you... from last Easter. Hehehe Hey, they talk about shotguns and such....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG23rZifKgQ

I saved that last one for a specific whitey co-worker. Almost every time I picked him up from court or special assignment and we were in uniform I would blast it on the good times radio with the window button held down. Slow traffic downtown, he turned beet red every time.
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