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Old May 13, 2018, 13:18   #1
krisincolfax
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Looking for break in oil suggestions

I'm sure this will open a can of worms ... , oh well here it goes , I would
like to know what would be the ideal lube / oil to break in my 1911 Gov't
model , so far all I've done is feild strip and clean with CLP and put 25
rounds thru it .
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Old May 13, 2018, 13:32   #2
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There is no such thing as "break in". It is a myth invented by gunwriter whores to rationalize their paid advertisers delivering guns that do not function out of the box.

If one is building a match gun, with close tolerances at the slide to frame, barrel to bushing, and barrel hood to slide; they are often lapped into place. This involves a lapping compound, not a lubricant. I have used Clover brand valve grinding compound - not sure what grit it is as I've had the same can for 25 years and it's illegible - but its fairly fine. Maybe 400 or 600 grit. Finer than that would be JB bore polisher, from Brownells.

If your out-of-the-box gun needs lapping for the slide to lock into battery, it is defective and should be returned to the manufacturer for repair.
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Old May 13, 2018, 13:44   #3
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The pistol runs fine , I'm happy with the fit and finish , I learned
somthing today , thankyou , what would be a good lube to use ?
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Old May 13, 2018, 14:00   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krisincolfax View Post
The pistol runs fine , I'm happy with the fit and finish , I learned
somthing today , thankyou , what would be a good lube to use ?
Continue with CLP and enjoy the ride.
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Old May 13, 2018, 14:12   #5
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The "special gun lubricant" is a multi-million dollar marketing campaign.

Consider the automobile industry. Which do you think is a more hostile environment.

1. An engine firing multiple cylinders and cycling at > 2000 RPMs for 4-5,000 miles between oil changes.

2. A gun firing 10 rounds a minute for a couple days a month.

I submit that #1 is a more hostile environment. Which suggests that whatever works in an automobile engine, is just fine for a gun.

I use a variation of Ed's Red. 1 part transmission fluid to 1 part kerosene, to 1 part mineral spirits (to thin it). I keep it in a vat and dunk rifles in it, hang for a day to drip dry, then wipe down any excess. For spot lube, I use air tool oil. Not for any special reason, other than it's right there on the shelf as I use it weekly to oil my air powered tools.

For the rare situation where I want grease, I use Coastal brand wheel bearing grease. I chose it because it is amber, and similar in appearance to Cosmolene (lanolin from sheep wool). Other wheel bearing greases such as the black stuff containing molybdneum disulfide, may be "better" at 75 mph, but are dirty and get all over everything. I use grease rarely because I am in a blowing dust environment, I prefer to run my guns "wet". Since I can't keep the fine, talcum powder dust out of the guns, and it quickly fouls "sticky" grease, I use copious amounts of thin oil so that the foreign matter can wash away from operating parts.

Sure - from a scientific comparison of function in specific parameters, there are some specialty lubes that will outperform others. But remember, that is in a very narrow context that may have no real value in the real world.

There is cleaning, lubricating, and protecting. There are humid environments and high-dust desert environments. What works well in one, may do poorly in another. What is a slick lube (low friction coefficient), may not have as high a corrosion protection as another product, that has a higher coefficient of friction.

I would not use WD-40, as it builds up a varnish over time.

Some love white lithium grease, but in the AZ environment it dries out to the consistency of clay.

So I just use my thinned tranny fluid for just about everything.

This is a nice comparison.

http://www.dayattherange.com/?page_id=3667

This is more along my line of thought

http://www.breachbangclear.com/fake-...rite-gun-lube/

another good article.

http://www.grantcunningham.com/2006/05/lubrication-101/

Finally, it is my assertion that any gun needs to function dry. Yes, it will function better with lube, but if it fails to cycle when dry, there is another underlying problem. To this end, I do all my trigger jobs dry. If I get a good trigger, lube will make it better. If I have a bad trigger job, lube will only disguise that fact . . . for a while.
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Old May 13, 2018, 20:14   #6
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I prescribe to Gunplumbers way of thinking on this. Any oil that is capable of withstanding the heat and friction of an engine for any where between 3K-10k before it needs to be changed surely can withstand the friction and heat produced from firing a gun.

I use Mobile 1 full synthetic 0 weight oil. Sure it’s a little expensive at about $10 a quart but if you look at what a 2 once bottle of Remoil costs the same. There are even more expensive choices out there too. I bought my quart of oil about 8 years ago and still have more than half left over. I’ve never had any problems with it and everything has functioned properly.
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Old May 13, 2018, 22:33   #7
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Can you take your 1911 completely apart? Are you going to shoot it a lot? If a gun sits some oils turn to a lacquer buildup because the oil doesn't move. If you can clean a gun right down to the build up then you are fine. Don't puddle the oil, just a light coating.

I use graphite grease on the rails of my semis, just a light coating to reduce friction and a light coating of oil on the exposed parts. I break em down when they are dirty and light oil the friction areas or grease the heavy friction areas. It's a machine, treat it good and it runs good.
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Old May 13, 2018, 22:41   #8
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Granted, this is apples to oranges, but when I was in the sandbox, the Air Force Security Forces Squadron I was working with were fielded the M4 Carbine, and turned in their M16A2s. These are the guys and girls that guard the airbase, and all those multi-billion dollar airplanes. We unboxed the M4s, gaged them (Air Force requirement), and issued them. The individual Airmen lubed them and zeroed them, then went out to their guard posts with them. Note that we did not fire XXX (insert number) of "break-in" rounds first. That's how it works in the real world. A gun had better function correctly right out of the box, or else I have no need for it.

Unfortunately, U.S. manufacturing has eliminated the quality assurance function, and now lets the customer perform those checks. They figure that dealing with the returns is less expensive than having a QA department, especially since most people will not return a defective product unless it is well and truly hosed.
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Old May 14, 2018, 10:09   #9
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I dont shoot a lot maybe 50 to 100 rounds 3 or 4 times a year ,
( that is with other pistols , this one is my first new one ever )
in fair weather , usually warm to hot and dusty conditions , as far
as take down , only feild strip and firing pin removal , so the pistol
sits more than it gets used , as I stated previous I'm satisfied with
the fit and finish , so far it has run perfect , So I'm not quite sure
yet as to what to use , think I'll try the air tool oil , maybe it wont
gum up as bad as motor oil over time ?
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Old May 14, 2018, 11:00   #10
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Sometimes it is tedious to answer the same questions over and over for 20 years. Sometimes a question gets my curiosity going, forces me to rethink what I think I know, and I learn new things.

This is an interesting thread on air tool oil, specifically mentioning firearms.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...ool-oil-97284/

https://www.amazon.com/Marvel-MM080R...ery%2Boil&th=1
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Old May 14, 2018, 11:40   #11
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I really appreciate your input and the links to the above articles ,
I never would have considered using the different oils mentioned ,
it's good to think outside of the box... , so I'm gona go with the
Marvel Mystery tool oil and see how that works .
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Old May 14, 2018, 11:48   #12
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I ran machinery for a living but it doesn't make me a know it all. Power tools use oil as an anti friction element. The friction produced builds heat and wear in machinery and it takes the right viscosity oil to fit the machine to make the machine last. Just about any oil will keep it running for a while but with machinery it takes the right oil to get the longest life out of the machine.

Guns are machines with moving parts, metal against metal should be lubricated. It's my opinion that the heaviest wear areas need grease to impregnate the surface. Vehicles use grease in wheel bearings because that's where the weight is, the load. They use a light viscosity oil because it needs to be pumped in the engine and the flow reduces friction and heat.

I don't believe oil viscosity is as important in guns and for surface coating with minimum friction most anything will do but you must maintain it so the oil doesn't turn to laquer. I strip the 1911 all the way down and grease the main wear points then light oil surfaces. The rails get grease. It's the way I operate a 1911.YMMV

Edited to add, all petroleum products cause cancer, read the MSDS sheet to get info on them. I wear rubber gloves cleaning guns. In power tools that run by air you will breath the oil you put in the tool.
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Old May 14, 2018, 11:49   #13
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Years ago the chain saw bar oil I use was on sale for dirt cheap so I bought 10/6 gallon cases of the Stihl bar oil just to have for the future as some of you know I prescribe to the mentality that two is one and one is none.

It's somewhat sticky, I mix this bar oil with kerosene 50/50 and apply it to the BC to receiver groove only.
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Old May 14, 2018, 12:07   #14
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Years ago the chain saw bar oil I use was on sale for dirt cheap so I bought 10/6 gallon cases of the Stihl bar oil just to have for the future as some of you know I prescribe to the mentality that two is one and one is none.

It's somewhat sticky, I mix this bar oil with kerosene 50/50 and apply it to the BC to receiver groove only.
Years ago a wrecking yard took in oil filled transformers from the electrical company here. The owner bottled the oil and sold it as motor oil. It was very carcinogenic and the state forced a cleanup of his yard where the transformers sat. He died of cancer from what I heard but he moved away when he got sick.

Foreman coated the bottom of his shoes every day with diesel as a release agent to keep asphalt from sticking to his shoes. He died of cancer in his feet. Fuels and oils can kill, stay clean.
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Old May 14, 2018, 12:15   #15
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I do not use any of the super lubricants or coatings. Generally use Lucas Synthetic Gun Oil because it works good and can be purchased off the shelf at my auto parts store where have professional account. Only time I vary from this is if know am taking a gun into a really dusty, sandy or muddy environment then for that session use Pedro's Ice Wax which buy at local bicycle shop. It's used for mountain bike chains, sprockets and gears and has great lubricity but repels mud, sand and dirt better than any lubricant have ever used. It's what I use on the lead screws of my CNC machine equipment at work. The tech reps for company that makes my CNC router said under normal use would replace lead screws every decade and based in hours mine runs every five to seven. Almost 20 years later and is in original lead screws and still in tolerance.

When use the wax based lubricant for a particular trip (like desert or crawling through mud) when clean gun after trip/event go back to my Lucas Gun Oil but honestly would use any standard gun oil and make sure gun doesn't get run dry. When I tighten the slide on a 1911 to fit to frame (using myriad of tools based on objective from slide tightening clamps to bars and others) if needs lapping then use Clovers Lapping Compound. Tightening slide to frame fit is not for just anyone and if do it wrong can ruin slide, frame or both. Seen people peen or weld pads on slide rails then grind and make a mess of their pistol as without proper jigs can have an out of square situation.

Most 1911's ship loose enough out of the box that after the obligatory 500 break in rounds with varied to verify has no gremlins put in holster and your good to go. The exception to this IMO are Kimbers. Kimber in general consistently ships the tightest slide to rail fit of any popular factory 1911. It's the most likely to be returned to local gun shops I use before first box is fired with complaints about feeding. One owner has trained his staff to recommend buyers not use their Kimber as a carry till have a 1,000 rounds through it to lossen it up unless it's obvious after a few hundred theirs is reliable.

Have more than one Kimber that was traded in due to being sluggish with weak range ammo and all were fine after I put a few hundred rounds of full power ball ammo through them. Have purchased eleven new SIG 1911's in past three or four years and all were 100% out of box with any ammo even cast wadcutters. Have seen some of the imports under different brand names from the Philippens give some issues from poor fit to weak springs out of box. When buy a budget 1911 from Asia this shold not be a complete surprise but some are not all that bad. Metro Arms are made there and seem to be decent.

Back to oil have a first cousin that was smart enough to buy Colt M16's and other full autos before prices went totally ludicrous 20 years ago. He/we may take several out and run more rounds per rifle in a day than some would in a year but buying ammo for him not an issue as was left well off by my uncle and has a well paying job on top of his Trust Fund. When rifles come in after a day or weekend of abuse he pulls the complete bolt carrier groups and drops in a bucket of Mobile 1 synthetic motor oil and let's soak for a day or three. After they soak he removes, hits with Gunblaster then let's them drain on some old towels. When seem to stop bleeding they get another quick hit of Gunblaster then go in ultrasound for just long enough he is confident all the crap has been cleaned out, he pulls bolt from carrier, inspects for cracks as wipes down with thin layer of 5W30 Mobile One synthetic, reassembles and puts back in rifle leaned with combination of Gunscrubber spray, Hopper and various brushes applicable to area of gun working on.

As an aside he has a mechanical engineering degree from Georgia Tech and currently teaches there but can't discuss his love of machineguns among liberal college professors and administration. Easier not to bring it up or let it out. He uses a very lightly oiled rag with same 5W30 to wipe down all parts and run patch down bore for storage. Just enough oil that guns are not stored dry. When comes time to shoot he gives each a liberal dose of Lucas Gun Oil (says it has an additive he likes for when guns are running) and lubes whenever begins to look dry.

When done he repeats clean up and storage with 5W30 Mobile One saying it's cheap and does everything he needs it to do spouting a bunch of gibberish about chemistry of additive package and it's ability to clean, protect and store long term. Goes back to range and as they come out of vehicle get the Lucas reintroduced. We both use Lucas Extreme Pressure Synthetic Grease on the rollers on M1a's/M14's for long term storage. (Like putting up for a decade) For keeping them lubed if running often I like the Lucas Red-n-Sticky in combination with a Brownells lube tool. Have a Badger lube tool as well somewhere.

Bottom quote from this link:

https://www.democraticunderground.co...dress=271x1301

Quote:
Mobile 1 5W30
P/P: -65.2 F
F/P: +446.0 F
V/100: 64.8 cSt
V/212: 11.3 cSt
TOR: 511.2 F
VI: 171

MILITEC-1 (for comparison purposes only)
P/P: -45.0 F
F/P: +455.0 F
V/100: 43.41 cSt
V/212: 5.63 cSt
TOR: 500.0 F
VI: 63

P/P - Pour Point (five degrees above level oil stops flowing readily)
F/P - Flash Point (temp oil emits vapor which will burn if exposed to ignition point)
V/100 - viscosity at 100 degrees F in centistokes(higher is better)
V/212 - viscosity at 212 degrees F
VI - Viscosity Index which indicates the oil's ability to retain viscosity over a given range of temperature (higher is better)
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Old May 15, 2018, 08:00   #16
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I have found Rig+P Stainless Steel Lube to be good stuff on SS guns. About the only thing that works well on my half-bastard SS frame with blued slide. Not a good combination, but it works, long story.

Like Bawana jim, I grease my 1911 rails after the frame/slide surfaces are worn smooth a bit and the pistol is functioning reliably.

Tried a bunch of lubes in the past, most all of them work except WD 40. The only use I have for that stuff is removing old Masking Tape.
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Old May 21, 2018, 01:00   #17
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While I have Hi Powers rather than 1911s, the lubrication is largely the same as what I'd do for the latter. Machines that lack seals, gaskets, etc. should be using grease, primarily, not oils.

To that end, I've been using Cherrybalmz Black Rifle Balm in my pistols and it's help up great. Provides good lubricity and stays in place well, unlike oil. It also helps to act like a sealant and keep some gunk out of the pistol. It's a very lightweight grease. For a couple of spots I like to lube but can't really apply grease, I put in a drop or two of ALG Go Juice. For really cold temps I have Cherrybalmz Winter Balm, but I've only been somewhere once that necessitated using something like that since I started using greaes like this.
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Old May 26, 2018, 07:55   #18
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Lubes

For me:

#1 oil = CLP

- alternatives are Rem Oil, Mobil 1, and 3-in-1 light oil (in that order)

- Grease; any time there is a combination of 2 or more metals being used (i.e. aluminum and steel as with AR15, etc., ) I use AeroShell 33. A little goes a long way and I clean often. This is what Colt recommends for assembly of the barrel nut to the upper receiver so I use it throughout.

I know an armorer that has fabricated a "lube tube" of PVC capped on one end and he fills it with Mobil 1 to dip the AR15 BCG(s) in whenever he cleans them and takes them apart. He assembles with Mobil 1 and submerges the whole BCG in the filled tube and leaves it there for a while. Pulls it back out and allows it to drain off a bit then puts it right in the weapon as it is.
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Old May 26, 2018, 22:41   #19
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I've found Opossum fat a fine lubricant, but they are hard to find all year round up North here.
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Old May 27, 2018, 12:47   #20
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^





I like the 'machine gunner' lube from Sprinco. I have no affiliation.

This is what they say about it:


MACHINE GUNNERS LUBE™

Machine Gunners Lube™ was developed to address specific requests from gun team leaders for a lube that would keep their machine guns properly lubricated during extended durations of full auto fire. Like most good gun teams, they work hard to stay on top of not letting the guns run dry. While many currently available lubes maintain lubricity when running "wet", some current war zone deployments do not favor traditional frequent and liberal applications, due to their propensity to attract fine desert silt particles, thereby increasing the risk of malfunctions. Our mission was to formulate a lube that would perform and protect weapon platforms in extreme environments subject to high heat, humidity, evaporative, and mechanical wear, even when applied lightly. Machine Gunners Lube™ meets these standards for all firearms ranging from handguns through .50 caliber machine guns.

Machine Gunners Lube™ is made from fully synthetic Group V base stocks. Poly Ester chains in Group V base stocks offer superior protection against thermal breakdown versus PAO's and GTL's, and contain significant natural solvent properties for self cleaning capabilities. In addition to minimizing carbon accumulation, the Poly Ester base oil acts as a water dispersant and corrosion inhibitor, protecting the lubricated parts in desert, jungle, and arctic climatic environments. Unique to Machine Gunners Lube™ is a proprietary re-micronized (0.3 micron) inhibited Molybdenum Disulfide (MOS2) component in colloidal suspension. In layman's terms, this means that the particles remain suspended within the lubricant, and do not segregate to the bottom of the container. Our inhibited MOS2 is specifically modified to retard, rather than induce corrosion. This moly component allows for a solid lubrication barrier in conjunction with the hydraulic lubrication afforded by the host synthetic lubricant. The re-micronized particles are small enough to penetrate the molecular lattice structure of the carbon, stainless, or chromium plated steel working surfaces of the weapon, where they are released under the heat of use to maintain the initial solid or "boundary" lubrication layer. No other moly additives on the market contain particles this small, nor do they share the unique ability to remain in colloidal suspension. Our proprietary manufacturing process allows the uniform distribution of the re-micronized MOS2 both within and upon the lubricated surfaces of the weapon. This ability provides a further advantage over other gun oils in the form of lubrication retention when the host / hydraulic lubricant is removed by mechanical, chemical, or environmental means. Basically, the weapon is still protected and has a functional advantage even when appearing "dry". The melting point of the MOS2 component is in excess of +2700°F !!! MSDS Available upon request to info@tacticalsprings.com.

High shear strength, and not susceptible to mechanical wear. High shear strength equates to increased surface tension, which in turn, keeps your parts coated for extended durations. This property also allows the use of Machine Gunners Lube™ for personal carry firearms, as it does not "run off" the pistol.
Stability in extreme heat, maintaining lubrication properties in temperatures exceeding +650°F.
Pour point of -50°F for reliable use in arctic deployment.
Contains NO Chlorinated Esters or PFTE (TEFLON®.)
Reduced carbon fouling deposition, and detergent properties make cleaning residue much easier and faster, even with .50 caliber platforms.
Available "Battle Bottle™" containers are sized to fit in any spare battery storage compartment found on most carbine platforms (grips, vertical foregrips, stocks) allowing the operator quick access to an ample quantity of lube in the field prior to return to FOB.
Unconditional "NO B.S." Money Back Satisfaction Guarantee!"
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Old June 01, 2018, 09:21   #21
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I'm a cheap, yet practical bastard. Like Mark said up top it a rather Huey-esque fashion, your vehicle's engine and suspension put WWWWAAAYYYYYY more heat cycles on lube than your gun, short of a SAW in current combat, is ever likely to see. All these cans and bottles of "gun oil" are, at minimum, $5 for a few ounces. F U G G T H A T.

My gun oil is Mobil 1. If I need to thin it to get it to places I use rubbing alcohol and acetone. I try to use grease as much as possible though, and for that, again, I use Mobil 1 axle grease in a tube meant for a grease gun. Quart of Mobil 1 5-W20... $6. Tube of Mobil 1 synthetic grease, $9 a tube. I've had the same tube of grease for probably 10 years, and I'm maintaining about 50ish guns with it. Mobil 1 oil I have a half quart left over from every oil change, so I always have it around. Neither have ever failed me, and, BTW, highly thinned Mobil 1 oil also makes for a nice case lube for sizing brass.

Anyway, back to OP's question... want a "break-in lube? Go get some very fine lapping compound (i.e. 600+) and rub some of that on your slide rails where it makes contact with the frame, then works the slide forward and backward a few hundred times. Action will get slick as glass. Clean it WELL, get some polishing done on the trigger group by someone that knows 1911s, and enjoy.
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