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-   -   WTK Charter Arms BullDog .44 special (http://www.falfiles.com/forums/showthread.php?t=296325)

Jaxxas September 18, 2010 18:48

WTK Charter Arms BullDog .44 special
 
In anticipation of a decent bonus this Christmas, (We've been busier than the proverbial one-armed paper hanger!) I'm trying to to do some early homework on a couple guns in which I'm interested.


First up is the Charter Arms .44 special BullDog.

I'm looking at this because I would like to increase my CCW firepower from a 9mm. Usually my CCW piece sits in my vehicle gunsafe, a Kahr 9mm. a sweet but expensive ($700+) pistol of medium power. I thought I might look at the Charter .44 special, as it has much more oomph, and if confiscated during a shoot, I'm out less than $400

Anybody have one? Any thoughts/reviews good or bad? All input is appreciated!

molotov September 18, 2010 19:44

I'll venture to say the Rossi 720 is a better choice.

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=190677850

You can find regular hammer models as well with both fluted or unfluted cylinders. I must say I enjoy mine, a good shooter. A lot of gun for the money. Very compact and powerful.

catmguy445 September 18, 2010 20:56

I've never owned a Bulldog, but I've worked at a couple of indoor ranges where we had one for rent, and I've shot them and handled them a fair amount. There are two versions of the gun. One is the original model, which Charter Arms produced for a lot of years, but was dropped from their product line when the company started having financial problems, as it wasn't their biggest seller. The older models were lightweight, and I suspect that they were built on a .38 caliber frame and used a five-shot cylinder to keep size and weight down. Unfortunately, this also made them a bit flimsy if the owner shot them a lot. The reputation the Bulldog had was that it was a good gun if you carried it a lot and shot it a little. If you did shoot one a lot, it would loosen up enough to develop end shake and timing problems in fairly short order, but they were cheap enough that no one worried about that very much. When it wore out, you'd just go buy another one. One other side effect of the light weight was that they kicked like a mule, even with .44 Spl. ammo.

The new Bulldogs are supposedly more durable than the old ones, but the basic design is still a little crude compared to other guns in its category, namely the S&W 696 and the Rossi that Molotov just mentioned. If it were my money, I'd look on Gun Broker for a used 696 (S&W stopped making them in 2002) or check out the Rossi 720, both of which will probably prove to be better guns than the Bulldog.

BUFF September 18, 2010 23:25

I bought my first Charter Arms Bulldog in 1976. A local sporting goods store had them on sale. I paid $89.50 out the door. I thought about it and went back and bought another one.

The early guns like mine have a steel frame and an aluminum grip and trigger guard frame that screws on. The barrel is a thin rifled tube with an aluminum sleeve. They are quite light, 19 ounces. The Bulldog is built on a larger frame than the 5 shot .38 Special Charter Undercover/Off Duty. The Bulldog is the size of a Colt Detective Special, a bit bigger than a S&W Chiefs Special (J frame) and a bit smaller than a S&W Model 19 (K frame). They have big, wide sights that are better than most fixed sight revolvers.

They kick. Pretty hard, even with most makers' 200 grain factory ammo.

I beat one of them to death with handloads, mostly 7.5 grains of Unique and a cast 250 grain bullet, good for 900-950 fps. After a pound's worth of Unique, the topstrap had stretched and there was a crater pounded around the firing pin hole in the frame's bolt face. The cylinder was rubbing on the rear of the barrel. Screws came loose at first but some loctite fixed that.

I still have the second one. I haven't shot handloads heavier than factory ammo through it, and it is fine after several hundred rounds. I dehorned the hammer and put wood smaller grips on it for carry. I haven't carried it much and it shoots better with larger rubber grips.

Cadillac, one of our old members that no longer visits us, had one bobbed to 2 inches and some sort of hard chrome or industrial nickel finish applied. I was envious of it.

I understand the current guns are stronger and a bit heavier. Their web site says 21 ounces, 2-1/2 inch barrel. The grip frame is now steel The extra weight would be good on a gun you aren't wearing. I don't know how much help 2 ounces will be.

If you can shoot one before you buy it, do it.

The .44 Special is my favorite handgun cartridge. I have a few. The S&W Model 696, mentioned above, is much larger, heavier (36 ounces) and all steel. It has been discontinued and is sort of a cult gun among S&W fans. It is also a 5 shot but is built on the S&W L frame, the size of a Colt Python or Trooper. They made a DAO, fixed sight version on an aluminum alloy frame with a titanium cylinder (19 ounces) called a Model 296 Centennial. Also, an 18 ounce target sight, conventional d.a./s.a. aluminum frame called a Model 396 Mountain Lite. These all will run you $600-$900 when you can find them.

The S&W's are in a far higher class than the Charter Arms guns. The Charter guns were built to a much lower price point. I think they are still a good value, though. Both makes are worth what they cost.

Texas Jaguar September 18, 2010 23:50

I owned a "Target" Bulldog for several years. The Target models had a 4" barrel and adjustable sights. It was five shot and a pretty basic piece of machinery.

Pachymar made a replacement set of grips that made the gun a lot easier to hang onto when firing it. The originals were wood and were much too skinny and slippery to grasp very well.

Did I mention that the gun had a fairly sharp amount of recoil? Not uncontrollable but definitely noticeable. The aluminum frame cut the weight significantly but you paid the price for that savings. Like I said the aftermarket grips helped with the recoil but they increased the size of the gun noticeably at the cost to concealability.

It shot factory ammo very well. Reloads, on the other hand, were another matter. The problem was keeping the bullets, either cast or jacketed, securely seated in the cases when firing. It didn't seem to matter what kind of bullet I chose or the amount or type of crimp I used. After a shot or two the remaining bullets were moving out the end of the cartridge cases.

I decided this situation was not the fault of the gun since it worked fine with factory loaded ammo. It had to have been the dies I was reloading with. I got an opportunity to sell it for a good price and did so since I seldom buy much factory loaded ammunition..

cpd109 September 19, 2010 13:03

I think this is the gun Son of Sam liked. Clint Eastwood liked the cartidge and used it instead of the 44 mag. I full agree with that having shot a 44 mag ONCE. Getting a second shot off in a hurry would be difficult. (I don't like 12 ga 3 inch magnums either- so what?)

I really do like the 44 Special cartidge- but the newer Charter Arms guns don't look like they have the quality of the older ones.

Jaxxas September 20, 2010 14:34

I have nothing again'st Rossi, just never though of them. I'd certainly consider most anything! :biggrin:

The S&W sounds a little big and too pricey for my usage, maybe even a bit of collector value. I'm thinking if it were stolen from my car safe, or confiscate indefinitely, it would be better if it were a less expensive reliable gun! And thought I might step up in power while I'm at it. I do like the .44!

The (professional ?) reviews I've read on the Charter BulDog are mostly good, but there is nothing like a hands on review from people ya know. I don't know that I would shoot it an awful lot, maybe a couple boxes a year. I'm a fairly proficient pistol shooter and practice regularly with several different models and I'm pretty OK with big recoil, but less would be better! Seems like the lifetime warranty would mean something.


Let's toss another possibility into the mix, opinions on the Taurus 605? Not as big as the .44 spl, but still a step up from a 9 mm. About the same physical size. Price is about right. I have a Taurus .22 that seems a decent gun.

I've got a couple of months, unless something hit's me over the head in the meantime. I'll try to find some of these guns give them a bit of a test run.

Thank you all for the input!

molotov September 20, 2010 15:18

Quote:

I don't know that I would shoot it an awful lot, maybe a couple boxes a year. I'm a fairly proficient pistol shooter and practice regularly with several different models and I'm pretty OK with big recoil, but less would be better!
Being the kind of utilitarian that I am I pretty well trimmed my entire handgun "collection" down to two pistols; The Rossi .44 for me and a Smith model 10-5 for the old lady. The rest was junk or excess.

I found that the .44 special in the smaller gun satisfied my thirst for power (not really into hand cannons) while being an accurate plinker.

Loading is everything. Want low recoil? Use one of those 200 grains you bought with about 6.2 grains of Unique powder. Want something that bumps a little? 7.0 grains in front of a 232 grain (I should have a few in the next few weeks).

I've found the recoil, on average, to be more pleasant than an equivalent size .357 magnum.

As for shooting a "couple boxes a year" I think that once you have a .44 special you will shoot it more than that. I'm not even a big pistol guy, but I generally put 100 round through it when it goes to the range four or five times a year.

Happy shopping. I have no doubt you'll find something good.

Jaxxas September 22, 2010 11:46

Quote:

Originally posted by molotov


Being the kind of utilitarian that I am I pretty well trimmed my entire handgun "collection" down to two pistols; The Rossi .44 for me and a Smith model 10-5 for the old lady. The rest was junk or excess.

I found that the .44 special in the smaller gun satisfied my thirst for power (not really into hand cannons) while being an accurate plinker.

Loading is everything. Want low recoil? Use one of those 200 grains you bought with about 6.2 grains of Unique powder. Want something that bumps a little? 7.0 grains in front of a 232 grain (I should have a few in the next few weeks).

I've found the recoil, on average, to be more pleasant than an equivalent size .357 magnum.

As for shooting a "couple boxes a year" I think that once you have a .44 special you will shoot it more than that. I'm not even a big pistol guy, but I generally put 100 round through it when it goes to the range four or five times a year.

Happy shopping. I have no doubt you'll find something good.

Down to 2 pistols? Wow you have the will power of Gandhi. Good on you! Personally I'm weak. No idea of how many pistols/firearms I own. If I 'HAD' to trim it down I could see a .44, .22, and a .45!

Not sure which way I'm going yet. If I go the .44, I'll be sure and try the load though. Lately I'm kinda leaning towards the Taurus 605 .357. Been reading/hearing better reviews. More versatile loading between the .357 and .38 spl. Same size/price/form factor, definitely wouldn't feel under powered!

molotov September 22, 2010 12:37

Quote:

Down to 2 pistols? Wow you have the will power of Gandhi. Good on you! Personally I'm weak. No idea of how many pistols/firearms I own.
I would like a reasonably priced 1911 seeing as how I don't have an auto and the 1911 is the most "revolver" like in terms of grip thickness. Still, I kill the craving for such a weapon by acknowledging that I would never bring it to the range as I like shooting revolvers much more.

.38 is dirt cheap to shoot and .44 special is fun shooting. Good enough for me. I have two accurate and reliable pistols, what more could I want? Maybe a 2nd Rossi.:)

Quote:

Not sure which way I'm going yet. If I go the .44, I'll be sure and try the load though. Lately I'm kinda leaning towards the Taurus 605 .357. Been reading/hearing better reviews.
Ever considered or looked at the 3" Ruger Sp-101? I was torn between that and the Rossi. The Ruger was over a hundred bucks more though. It is a heavy little sucker. Built like a tank. Thick forcing cone. Could use a set of decent grips but a very solid piece.

Timber Wolf September 24, 2010 10:20

I have an earlier (donít know the exact vintage) Bulldog in very good shape that I like a lot. It has rather hand-filling factory wood grips on it and I have not found a factory load that bothers me in shooting it. I have small, beefy mitts and these grips feel good to me. I also have a S&W 296 but somebody messed with it before I got it and it has timing issues. I need to send it back to S&W and let them sort it out as it is too much ($$$$$$) handgun to be sitting around broken in the safe. I have not laid it over the Bulldog to compare but the 296 seems like a lot larger gun then the Bulldog. I would not hesitate to carry a good old or new Bulldog. Even though I own a Bulldog, I usually either CCW smaller, lighter guns (S&W 642 or Ruger LCP) or larger more powerful ones (Ruger Speed Six .357 or XDsc .40). The new Bulldogs have a shrouded ejector rod I think but I donít see that as an issue with the old one. A hammer shroud would be cool making it into more of a pocket piece. I may look for a reasonably priced Rossi as I can always use another .44 Special. Buff brings up a good point about the Bulldogs, beware of one somebody has shoot too many hotter loads out of.

Jaxxas September 26, 2010 00:15

Quote:

Originally posted by molotov


I would like a reasonably priced 1911 seeing as how I don't have an auto and the 1911 is the most "revolver" like in terms of grip thickness. Still, I kill the craving for such a weapon by acknowledging that I would never bring it to the range as I like shooting revolvers much more.

.38 is dirt cheap to shoot and .44 special is fun shooting. Good enough for me. I have two accurate and reliable pistols, what more could I want? Maybe a 2nd Rossi.:)



Ever considered or looked at the 3" Ruger Sp-101? I was torn between that and the Rossi. The Ruger was over a hundred bucks more though. It is a heavy little sucker. Built like a tank. Thick forcing cone. Could use a set of decent grips but a very solid piece.

I like 1911's but I prefer my XD in .45. Real joy to shoot. I shoot quite a few different pistols, so I rarely put much more than a couple 100 rounds or so through any of them in a year.

I love Rugers! Own several! But it was a little pricier than I was thinking, and a little heavier. I'm going to try to shoot a Rossi and a Charter Arms before buying.

Jaxxas September 26, 2010 00:34

Quote:

Originally posted by Timber Wolf
I have an earlier (donít know the exact vintage) Bulldog in very good shape that I like a lot. It has rather hand-filling factory wood grips on it and I have not found a factory load that bothers me in shooting it. I have small, beefy mitts and these grips feel good to me. I also have a S&W 296 but somebody messed with it before I got it and it has timing issues. I need to send it back to S&W and let them sort it out as it is too much ($$$$$$) handgun to be sitting around broken in the safe. I have not laid it over the Bulldog to compare but the 296 seems like a lot larger gun then the Bulldog. I would not hesitate to carry a good old or new Bulldog. Even though I own a Bulldog, I usually either CCW smaller, lighter guns (S&W 642 or Ruger LCP) or larger more powerful ones (Ruger Speed Six .357 or XDsc .40). The new Bulldogs have a shrouded ejector rod I think but I donít see that as an issue with the old one. A hammer shroud would be cool making it into more of a pocket piece. I may look for a reasonably priced Rossi as I can always use another .44 Special. Buff brings up a good point about the Bulldogs, beware of one somebody has shoot too many hotter loads out of.
Good to hear nice things about Charter Arms. I too like a lighter gun for carry if I carried a lot. I don't carry often or for very long usually. Mostly when visiting some rentals, otherwise it sits in the car safe. Thought it would be fun to have a less expensive bigger carry piece. Would kinda like the .44 special but could go with the .357, not sure yet. I do like the ejector shrouds, both looks and utility, but I don't like the bobbed or shrouded hammer even though it makes good sense!

With all the great feedback, I think I can be fairly confidant that if I buy a new Rossi or Charter Arms in .44 and I don't abuse it, It will probably hold up for years!

Texgunner September 26, 2010 10:33

I bought one about three weeks ago. Mine is the stainless steel model, with a hammer. The finish is an attractive matte gray. After I ordered my
Bulldog, I ordered several different brands/loads of .44 spl. ammunition from Midway. By the time the pistol arrived, only one type had arrived. So, I took the Bulldog and a box of Hornady 180 gr. XTP (1000 fps @ muzzle) out to the farm. I shot offhand from about 16' and the best I did was all five in a 2 1/4" group that was about 1 1/4" low, this in single-action mode.

I'm waiting for the back-ordered remainder of my .44 spl order to see if all the loads print low. The front sight may get a little judicious trimming. The pistol's finish had one or two small blemishes, fortunately they are in hard to see areas. It was hard to open the cylinder at first, but that has improved with more use. Single-action trigger is not bad actually while double-action is quite stout as you might expect. The front sight has a sharp "point" at it's peak, and as I said, this might get a bit of smoothing to raise my POI.

So far, I like the Bulldog. Ammunition is expensive for me as a non-handloader; I believe all the different stuff I ordered averaged out at about $1.20 per round. I just bought the gun to have something different to carry, and as a way to spend a little "mad money" for a change. Oh, I bought it through a local gunshop for $416 out the door. With the Davidsons Gallery of Guns' lifetime guarantee, I feel good about it.
Gary

BUFF September 26, 2010 18:42

Handguns tend to shoot low(er) with lighter bullets. It's a combination of less recoil raising the muzzle and higher velocity/less time in the barrel.

The traditional,, original .44 Special loading is a 246 grain lead bullet at 750 fps but out of the shorter barrels they never break 700 fps. Mine shot more-or-less to elevation with the standard ammo or handloads that duplicated it. When the 200 grain ammo came out (Federal SWC-HP and Winchester Silvertip), they both shot low for me, too.

Figure out what you want to carry before you permanently modify that front sight. Most of the better self defense ammo made currently is 200 grain.

doubletap September 26, 2010 22:16

Had an early version of the "Target Bulldog" which shot pretty darn well actually. Pop cans at 50 yards were in trouble, might take 2 shots but you could hit them. Never felt factory 246 gr. stuff had any recoil to speak of, much more comfortable to shoot than my 442 Smith with +P stuff by far. I traded it for a nice Official Police a local sheriff had retired and can't say I've looked back.
Bought a newer one at an auction sale about 10 years ago. It was the standard Bulldog. It was much rougher in finish and action. Took it apart to do a bit of an action job which helped, and seeing all the tool marks and burrs inside told the tale. If you can't tolerate a revolver that holds the grip frame to the frame with a couple of pins, you won't like the Charter. They are a basic gun, and as many have already said, you can shoot them loose relatively quickly.
A good shooting buddy has the Rossi in a bobbed hammer 3" (?) version in stainless. He shoots some relatively stiff loads, 240 gr. stuff at 950-1000 fps, and he's been using it for over 10 years. It's still in one piece and in time. Yes, it's a heavier gun, but it's considerably more stout. For equal money, I'd take the Rossi.

catmguy445 September 29, 2010 18:49

This has turned out to be a real interesting thread. I'm a .44 Spl fan also, as far as wheelguns go. I still prefer 1911-type .45's, but I definitely don't have anything against revolvers. The one .44 Spl snubby that I didn't mention is one that I've owned for a number of years, but I didn't include it because it wasn't a regular production gun. It's an S&W Mdl. 24-3, which was a Lew Horton special that he had S&W make a short run of for him. The gun is a 6-shot .44 Spl. N frame with a 3" barrel and a K frame round butt. It came with the S&W wood combat grips, which I replaced with Pachmayr rubber grips, but kept the original wood ones. It's moderately heavy, but not as bulky as you might think. It has the S&W red ramp/white outline adjustable sights and is ordnance steel with a polished blue finish and combat trigger and hammer, which are casehardened.

All in all, it's a very attractive gun, and a real sweetheart to shoot. It's also very accurate, and will shoot a 2-3" group at 25 yards offhand, double action. It's not exactly a pocket pistol, but can be a CCW gun if you use a holster. It's as solid as a Baldwin locomotive, and the action was really smooth right out of the box. I don't know if Horton had S&W slick up the actions on these guns or whether I just got lucky with this one, but either way, the action is superb. The double action pull is smooth, and the single action is light, clean, and crisp, with no creep. It's so much fun to shoot that it's almost criminal. It feels about like shooting a K frame .38 with +P. It's one of my 3 favorite wheelguns, and I think it's kind of a shame that S&W didn't make a regular production handgun like this, but they didn't. It's a bit bigger and heavier than a Bulldog, but not by that much, and it's a lot more gun. Only problem is that there never were very many of them built, and the folks that have them don't want to part with them, so they're REALLY hard to find now. Which is why I didn't mention them until just now. But if you CAN find one, grab it. You won't ever regret it.

molotov September 29, 2010 19:29

Quote:

I do like the ejector shrouds, both looks and utility, but I don't like the bobbed or shrouded hammer even though it makes good sense!
That makes two of us.

Quote:

With all the great feedback, I think I can be fairly confidant that if I buy a new Rossi or Charter Arms in .44 and I don't abuse it, It will probably hold up for years!
I think if you handle it or at least buy from a reputable dealer you shouldn't have any major malfunctions.

Quote:

I like 1911's but I prefer my XD in .45. Real joy to shoot.
I have tried the 5 inch tactical 45 and the sub compact 9mm. The five inch was a definite shooter, but I just prefer the single stack grips of the 1911 because I'm a revolver guy and like revolver thickness grip size. Everything else feels slightly clunky to me otherwise.

I also kind of need the beavertail grip or I get bit all the time because I'm used to riding high with my left hand on my revolvers and always wind up with my hand in the danger zone on an auto.

Quote:

It's so much fun to shoot that it's almost criminal. It feels about like shooting a K frame .38 with +P.
I have a k frame I load for. I found that when I went over 5 grains of Unique under a 158 grain RNFP, that it was bordering on having more "snap" than a slightly warm .44 load in my Rossi. Course the model 10 is a pencil barrel, which contributes to that I reckon, but I was still impressed with how controllable the .44 is in comparison. Slightly more controllable than a .357 in an equal sized/weight gun in my experience.

STGThndr October 05, 2010 04:00

Full-sized .44 Special revolver wanted
 
Id like a nice medium-sized revolver in .44 spec. Not a mini-revolver like the Bulldogs try to be (ouch that recoil is profound). Not a magnum sized pistol but one made for the .44 from the git-go, maybe something along the lines of what a .45 LC would be. Or is the .44Spec a loading that doesnt need to exist except as a lighter load for an otherwise .44 Mag chambered revolver?
I reload for both and the Special is a "pop"gun when fired from my magnums.
Have put some thought into having a Ruger .357 bored out and rechambered for the .44 Special. Dunno how cost effective that would be!

Texgunner October 05, 2010 09:54

I didn't notice any severe recoil when I shot the Bulldog. Certainly nothing in the league of a .44 mag. As for its size; I laid the Bulldog on top of my usual carry gun, a S&W 5904 9mm auto, and dimensionally, it's about the same size. Some have referred to the Bulldog as a "pocket pistol". They must have some big pockets.
Gary

catmguy445 October 05, 2010 12:40

Re: Full-sized .44 Special revolver wanted
 
Quote:

Originally posted by STGThndr
Id like a nice medium-sized revolver in .44 spec. Not a mini-revolver like the Bulldogs try to be (ouch that recoil is profound). Not a magnum sized pistol but one made for the .44 from the git-go, maybe something along the lines of what a .45 LC would be. Or is the .44Spec a loading that doesnt need to exist except as a lighter load for an otherwise .44 Mag chambered revolver?
I reload for both and the Special is a "pop"gun when fired from my magnums.
Have put some thought into having a Ruger .357 bored out and rechambered for the .44 Special. Dunno how cost effective that would be!

You'd probably love one of those S&W 696's. They were built on the L frame, which is Smith's heavy medium frame. You might also consider an S&W Model 24 with a 4" barrel. It's an N frame, but is designed to be a .44 Spl only. I don't know if Smith is still producing them, but they were in production for a lot of years, so if you check GB for a while, one should show up there, or a local pawn shop or gun shop might have a used one on hand.

At today's labor prices, it probably wouldn't be cost effective to convert a Ruger, but your saying that reminded me that it's been done. I remember seeing an article a long time ago......I think it might have been in Guns & Ammo.........about a gunsmith somewhere building a .44 Spl out of a Ruger Security Six or Service Six. He rebarreled it and built a new cylinder, and it seemed to work pretty well, and obviously was a medium size revolver, but I don't think he ever built very many of them. It would probably take less time and cost less to find an S&W Model 696 or Model 24 or 624 (same gun in stainless) than to make a .44 out of a GP100 or Security Six. But it's an interesting thought.

maxhush October 05, 2010 13:37

Re: Re: Full-sized .44 Special revolver wanted
 
Quote:

Originally posted by catmguy445

It would probably take less time and cost less to find an S&W Model 696 or Model 24 or 624 (same gun in stainless) than to make a .44 out of a GP100 or Security Six. But it's an interesting thought.

I have a 6" Model 24 and a 624 and like them both quite a lot.

TideWater 41009 October 05, 2010 20:36

Re: Full-sized .44 Special revolver wanted
 
Quote:

Originally posted by STGThndr
Id like a nice medium-sized revolver in .44 spec. Not a mini-revolver like the Bulldogs try to be (ouch that recoil is profound). Not a magnum sized pistol but one made for the .44 from the git-go, maybe something along the lines of what a .45 LC would be. Or is the .44Spec a loading that doesnt need to exist except as a lighter load for an otherwise .44 Mag chambered revolver?...
I would not refer to the .44 Bulldog as a small framed revolver. It would certainly qualify as medium, at least in my opinion.

The .44 Special is a loading that serves its own purpose very well, and the Charter Arms .44 is a prime example. I bought a new one in 2006. It had kind of a "cheap" feel to it, but it worked great. I sold it just a few months ago and regret it.

Charter Arms never sold out like Ruger did, or added the silly lock on the side like S&W, so I give them credit for that.

win308 October 07, 2010 17:06

I had one of the first .44 Bulldogs and 10 years later had a second. NEITHER would hit or group worth a damn.....not an accurate gun by any standard. Don't know about current models and I doubt I ever will. Two of them were plenty enough for me. My carry is now a S&W 638 with laser grips..... a small J frame .38 special lightweight that shoots pretty straight.

Thomas October 07, 2010 20:05

Just won a Rossi 720 in 44 special on Gunbroker 3 inch barrel with bobed hammer. Double action only. Been wanting one for a long time.
Always thought it would be the best concealed carry gun.
Can not wait for it to arrive. Only bid on it after reading this thread.

Jaxxas October 07, 2010 22:29

Quote:

Originally posted by Thomas
Just won a Rossi 720 in 44 special on Gunbroker 3 inch barrel with bobed hammer. Double action only. Been wanting one for a long time.
Always thought it would be the best concealed carry gun.
Can not wait for it to arrive. Only bid on it after reading this thread.

Cool! Can't wait for a range report!

molotov October 07, 2010 23:02

Quote:

Just won a Rossi 720 in 44 special on Gunbroker 3 inch barrel with bobed hammer. Double action only. Been wanting one for a long time. Always thought it would be the best concealed carry gun. Can not wait for it to arrive. Only bid on it after reading this thread.
Post pics and a range report when you get it! An FFL in law of mine used to buy those blue boxed Rossis a dozen in an order. I think when they came out, the 720 was going for $250 new.

For example:

Here's a nice unfluted .357 magnum with 2.5 inch barrel for $310 with no bidders yet:

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=194333673

A ported version of the same gun, only with flutes:

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=193143312

How about a hunting version for $400 (you can get the all out "Cyclops" model for about $450):

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=194046544

The 720's aren't as common. Guys don't give them up and probably a lot less of them sold. Kind of like finding a Savage 112 fvss in 7mm mag w/ stainless action and barrel and synthetic stock in like new condition for sale. People who buy them don't let them go.

I was lucky enough to be browsing gunbroker when I noticed a 720 for sale just up the road in Clearwater, so I was able to check it out first. I paid around $400, but the little extra I spent was worth it to check it out first. I have seen them go for $330 very recently on gunbroker. A deal!

Bubba FAL October 08, 2010 00:39

I bought a Bulldog somewhere around 2003-2004, really like it. Very nice trigger in SA mode. Muzzle blast is much better than a .357 snubbie.

Had to do some dremel work on the left hand rubber grip to allow clearance for speedloaders. Also did some polishing on the trigger guard as the edges were quite sharp.

Recoil with 240gr. loads is certainly noticeable. I stick with 185gr XTPs for defense loads. I do check the screws after firing - they do tend to loosen up, especially with heavier loads. Suppose I could loc-tite them...

Timber Wolf October 15, 2010 15:27

Quote:

Originally posted by Thomas
Just won a Rossi M720 in .44 special on Gunbroker, 3 inch barrel with bobbed hammer. Can not wait for it to arrive. Only bid on it after reading this thread.
I hope you are happy, I just did the EXACT same thing!:D I have an older Charter Bulldog, a S&W 296, a Taurus Titanium .45 Colt (model 445?), two S&W model 38s & a 642, two Colt Cobras (one with factory hammer shroud), a Colt Courier & a Bankers Special, Ruger 3" SP101 and a 2 3/4" Speed Six and a 2 3/4" Security Six, a 2 1/2" RB S&W 19, and a snubbie barrel for my Dan Wesson M15, so I needed another snubbie revolver like a hole in the head. I had a 4" Rossi .22 (ASNIB) and a .38 snubbie both in stainless that I lament letting get away. If I like the M720 as much as I liked my other Rossi revolvers I will be a happy camper. I do not expect the M720 to get away anytime soon. Now, what did I do with my .44 Special dies and brass? :confused:

molotov October 16, 2010 09:21

Quote:

I hope you are happy, I just did the EXACT same thing!
This thread is really getting good!

Quote:

so I needed another snubbie revolver like a hole in the head.
Wow, you have serious addictions. Wish I had one of those Rugers, even though I don't "need" it. Speed six is awesome.

Quote:

I had a 4" Rossi .22 (ASNIB) and a .38 snubbie both in stainless that I lament letting get away.
Ouch. I like the all steel snub Rossi's a pile better than the aluminum framed Smith stuff. They have pretty dang good triggers for five shot snubbies in my experience and are quite accurate to boot.

Quote:

If I like the M720 as much as I liked my other Rossi revolvers I will be a happy camper.
Unless you somehow manage to get a dud, you will be a very happy camper.:)

dogngun October 24, 2010 06:42

Once owned a Charter Arms Bulldog - the worst
 
The Bulldog I bought used about 10 years ago was the worst revolver I have owned in 45 years of shooting handguns. The cylinder jammed up and after several attempts at repairing it, I traded it back to the shop where I bought it.
I KNOW others have had grat ones, I am just passing my experience on.

I have owned Rossi's and not had a bad one...I'd go for the Rossi - in fact, it looks like a very interesting little gun and pretty useful.

mark

Timber Wolf November 01, 2010 08:50

Got to shoot the new-to-me little stainless Rossi M720 blaster this past weekend exactly 10 times (two cylinders full) and I'm pretty happy with it! Was really informal just shooting at a white rag hung over a tree limb off-hand at around 20-25 feet but when I did my part the M720 did too. Smooth, clean, pretty light DAO trigger pull and recoil that let you know you were shooting something big but not fiercesome. I like it a lot and am looking forward to an extended shooting session with it very soon. I had it and the Charter Bulldog packed up for a range trip yesterday but my daughter was too excited about halloween so we ended up not going.:sad: I just stayed home and sorted brass and called a guy I have trying to get up with who came by and sold me two Winchester 67s! :D I have more .22 rifles than anything but always have room for a few more!:wink: :wink:


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