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View Full Version : Any tricks for removing wood stock?


lew
December 11, 2017, 22:51
One of my FALs wears a South African long Type C buttstock. It's fairly fragile and holeeee shit does it make the rifle ass heavy. I need to swap it out, but it seems that, with the coats of oil on it, it's swollen on the recoil tube. The tang screw has been removed.

Any ideas on how to remove it (preferably without destroying it)?

falbuild
December 12, 2017, 00:16
hot air blower. Blow lightly. Should melt the oil & expand the wood slightly.

yellowhand
December 12, 2017, 00:26
I use a deep well socket, one a little larger than the recoil tube, place the lower down between my knees, wrapped in a towel, use a small hammer, tapping the deep well socket touching the recoil tube.
Pulling up on the stock, while tapping down on the recoil tube via the deep well socket, I've loosen some really stuck on stocks and not hurt anything.
Ya don't need to bang it, just firm taps while putting hand pressure on the wood stock, pulling it away from the lower.
They are stuck in only a small place and pop loose pretty quickly this way.

yellowhand
December 12, 2017, 00:39
You can gently tap on the ferrule and try to wiggle the stock from left to right as you are pulling on it. If we are trying expand/contract I would try sticking the lower in the freezer for a little while and then try the tapping and wiggling. :biggrin:


edited to add: I've used the same method as yellowhand and that works well too.

I've got a C stock stuck on a lower pretty darn good, like really good,:facepalm: that the local owner wants refinished, going to do my tap, tap, tap, tap, thingy tomorrow, this time, trying not to cut my leg last last time, ie, a much thicker towel wrapping this go around. :D

embatp
December 12, 2017, 03:18
Dynamite

nwobhm
December 12, 2017, 06:40
Tap a thin flat head screwdriver between the rear of lower and ferule. Go slow.

4markk
December 12, 2017, 07:47
I use a deep well socket, one a little larger than the recoil tube, place the lower down between my knees, wrapped in a towel, use a small hammer, tapping the deep well socket touching the recoil tube.
Pulling up on the stock, while tapping down on the recoil tube via the deep well socket, I've loosen some really stuck on stocks and not hurt anything.
Ya don't need to bang it, just firm taps while putting hand pressure on the wood stock, pulling it away from the lower.
They are stuck in only a small place and pop loose pretty quickly this way.

^^^^This .... except I reinsert the recoil tube nut about 1/4th of the way. Then put the buttstock removal tool on the nut and give it a good hit with a hammer.

Like he said above, once you break it free she usually comes off. If not, you will now have an opening to pry or us a different punch to hammer.

gunplumber
December 12, 2017, 08:21
I use a deep well socket, one a little larger than the recoil tube, place the lower down between my knees, wrapped in a towel, use a small hammer, tapping the deep well socket touching the recoil tube.
Pulling up on the stock, while tapping down on the recoil tube via the deep well socket, I've loosen some really stuck on stocks and not hurt anything.
Ya don't need to bang it, just firm taps while putting hand pressure on the wood stock, pulling it away from the lower.
They are stuck in only a small place and pop loose pretty quickly this way.

Right idea, but the cost of repairing a return spring tube if just one thread is deformed, makes this a high risk measure.

I take a return spring plug with the head turned off to same diameter as the tube. screw it in, then you can hammer the tube out with much less risk of damaging those threads.

If you could buy a tap to chase the threads, it wouldn't matter as much, but as this is a custom made tap and die set, I can't see the risk/reward of striking the tube directly.

^^^^This .... except I reinsert the recoil tube nut about 1/4th of the way. Then put the buttstock removal tool on the nut and give it a good hit with a hammer.

Like he said above, once you break it free she usually comes off. If not, you will now have an opening to pry or us a different punch to hammer.

yes, it usually just needs to start. My method is for when this one isn't enough.

nwobhm
December 12, 2017, 08:27
Loctite the nut.....then wrench the entire tube off.

lockjaw
December 12, 2017, 08:56
Tap a thin flat head screwdriver between the rear of lower and ferule. Go slow.

DO NOT jam a screw driver between the stock and receiver.... the only way thing will achieve is damaging your stock and receiver.

nwobhm
December 12, 2017, 08:59
DO NOT jam a screw driver between the stock and receiver.... the only way thing will achieve is damaging your stock and receiver.

Interesting.....done it a good number of times on a C stock without issue.

J. Armstrong
December 12, 2017, 09:02
I have as well, but admit it does have an element of risk. You have to resist the " almost --- just a little harder" impulse.

It doesn't always work, and it's an absolute no-no on type B.

lockjaw
December 12, 2017, 09:23
Interesting.....done it a good number of times on a C stock without issue.

It is bad advice.

In my experience, the area that binds is the wood between the recoil tube and ramped tang. This area is already tight, wedging something in there only increases the tension, requiring increased leverage to pry the stock off.

What differentiates the bubba build and a quality build is patience and using the right tools. Sometimes luck works in favor of those who are impatient.... but more often than not it bites the builder in the ass, and the results are typically costly.

lockjaw
December 12, 2017, 09:37
I have as well, but admit it does have an element of risk. You have to resist the " almost --- just a little harder" impulse.

It doesn't always work, and it's an absolute no-no on type B.

I'm a bit of a knuckle dragger....I have learned the hard way to avoid putting myself in this situation whenever possible. I have learned (begrudgingly...) to walk away if I don't have the right tool or knowledge, and come back to it later.

lew
December 12, 2017, 11:45
If I run the recoil spring nut in a few threads- say halfway- insert the buttstock tool, and pound on that, do you folks think that will be enough force to dislodge it, or do you think the stock is going to fight me every step of the way?

meltblown
December 12, 2017, 11:56
If I run the recoil spring nut in a few threads- say halfway- insert the buttstock tool, and pound on that, do you folks think that will be enough force to dislodge it, or do you think the stock is going to fight me every step of the way?

Once you get it past the tang, you can twist it back and forth more. You have to try it to find out just how stuck it is.

lew
December 12, 2017, 12:31
^^^^
This

This method worked for me just fine.

Oh thank God. I was prepared to chisel the stock in half lengthwise, but I'd rather keep it intact and not needlessly ruin a functional piece of history.

Once you get it past the tang, you can twist it back and forth more. You have to try it to find out just how stuck it is.

Nice. From the cracking noise, I'm thinking some of the tung oil may have bonded the stock to the tube, but we shall see. A little heat in the tube should fix that.

With a C stock you have the ferrule to pry against, no damage has ever occurred that I've experienced or heard of.

As long as the lower doesn't get buggered, I don't care. I think I have an extra ferrule, and they're not that pricey.

gunplumber
December 12, 2017, 13:21
FWIW, if there is any hesitation on the stock sliding over the tube after refinish, I make sure to clean out the channel.

I used to use 80# sandpaper on a flap sander, but that tended to widen both ends more than the middle.

So in my never-ending quest to "do it better", I found an appropriate drill bit and soldered it to a long extension. I just could not find one of those really long drills in the appropriate size.

lockjaw
December 12, 2017, 14:28
With a C stock you have the ferrule to pry against, no damage has ever occurred that I've experienced or heard of.

The ferrule can be damaged, as well as the high edges of the receiver.

I find it hard to believe that you have never seen pry marks on a lower, especially the beat to hell Turkish G1 kits that are beloved today.

Encouraging someone to pry a stock off with a screwdriver is bubba BS, there are safer and more effective ways to do it without risking damage to your rifles.

lockjaw
December 12, 2017, 15:11
I find it hard to believe that you give a shit what others do with or to their own equipment. You don't seem the type.

A person asked for advice.

A couple Bubba's gave bad Bubba basement gunsmithing advice.

Some excellent and effective methods were presented which are superior to prying shit apart with a screw driver. Your right, if the person chooses to embrace bad Bubba basement gunsmithing, I don't care.... well, at least until the point that Bubba dumps their damaged goods on someone else. That never happens, does it?

lockjaw
December 12, 2017, 15:17
If I run the recoil spring nut in a few threads- say halfway- insert the buttstock tool, and pound on that, do you folks think that will be enough force to dislodge it, or do you think the stock is going to fight me every step of the way?

This is the method I learned and practice. All you should need is a wack or two on the buttstock tool with a mallet to relieve the pressure between the spring tube and ramped tang. From there you can wiggle the stock back and forth enough to pull past the tang.... then can you rotate the stock off if necessary. It isn't rocket science.

yellowhand
December 12, 2017, 19:32
Well, tap,tap, tap worked on mine this afternoon, but got to admit, in that I always listen to my betters, ran the nut back in a few turns, inserted the stock tool, and was extra careful not to fug up those threads.:wink:

Learn a new method, which worked better than what I was doing.

Thanks all

meltblown
December 12, 2017, 19:44
Well, tap,tap, tap worked on mine this afternoon, but got to admit, in that I always listen to my betters, ran the nut back in a few turns, inserted the stock tool, and was extra careful not to fug up those threads.:wink:

Learn a new method, which worked better than what I was doing.

Thanks all

Well I like my Rhodie long butt. Had to run it through the dishwasher about 3 times as it looked like it was creosoted, buffed it some with 0000 steel wool and a few coats of BLO. Now it doesn't smell like rhinoceros ass and is sealed up a little to last another 50 years plus I don't care if it gets a scratch. When I first found it in a pile of parts I got, it to me was worthless. Now it has a SA FAL for it's home.

lew
December 13, 2017, 12:18
Tapping on the recoil spring nut via the buttstock tool worked like a charm. The stock is safely in the parts box and a synthetic stock has been installed. I'm not rough on my FAL's, but the synthetic stocks are leagues more durable.

yellowhand
December 13, 2017, 13:21
Tapping on the recoil spring nut via the buttstock tool worked like a charm. The stock is safely in the parts box and a synthetic stock has been installed. I'm not rough on my FAL's, but the synthetic stocks are leagues more durable.

Outstanding!