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Bawana jim
October 23, 2017, 23:23
Rumor has it Colt is down to one man building their SAA and they are not taking any orders in the custom shop. If they fold up then look for prices on the SAA to climb like the Pythons did. Again them folding is just a rumor but I certianly am glad I got mine allready.:biggrin: It's not a rumor that they won't take any custom shop orders on the SAA, but they are taking custom shop orders on their 1911s

Retired Bum
October 24, 2017, 09:02
The Colt SAA is just one of those handguns that don't go away for good. There are 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generations to back up my statement. I bought a NIB Colt SAA 3rd gen several years ago. A color case hardened frame model with the 4 3/4 inch barrel in .45 Colt. Still have it although I don't shoot it anymore.

When a popular firearm gets too pricey for most buyers then its days are numbered. Just look at the HK P7 series. The Swiss and German P210's. The Mauser Parabellum. I paid $1100 for my SAA but I haven't kept up with prices. I should probably sell it one of these days. Let someone else enjoy it.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

Bawana jim
October 24, 2017, 11:03
The Colt SAA is a iconic legend and everyone should own one. To me it's the top gun of the ten everyone should own. First made in 1873 and is still being made today, for a little while longer. It hasn't gone away because it is a great gun, simple,accurate and reliable. Lots of smith's to tune them and plenty of parts available. It will be a sad day when they quit making these works of art and Tupperware takes its place.

Bawana jim
October 24, 2017, 12:03
Guy laid off from Colt had this observation.


"Also I would not doubt that the man that is building the SAA on the production floor is retiring in January. He has been there over 40 years. Also there is only one production floor polisher capable of polishing single actions and he is probably ready to retire too."

Will they hire and train when they are this close to the end?

Retired Bum
October 24, 2017, 16:34
It is my not so humble opinion that during the Vietnam War when Colt was cranking out huge numbers of M16A1 rifles that the Colt exec's let civilian sales of handguns slide in favor of very profitable military contracts.

Since the end of the Vietnam War Colt has seen its share of ups and downs. Mostly downs IMHO. Quality control slipped and some very questionable decisions occurred over the years. Like that absolutely awful AA2000 9mm pistol. The poly framed .22 Kadet. Dropping all of their double action revolvers from production. At least Colt didn't drop their 1911 models.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

Bawana jim
October 24, 2017, 17:19
Smith went belly up and came back stronger than ever but then they have people there that really want to sell guns.:D

D P Six
October 24, 2017, 18:56
Production of SAA's limped along in the early 20th century until the start of WW2 when the obsolete gun was cancelled permanently. Permanently until the cowboy horse operas hit the TV screens in the mid 50's. Single action revolvers demand help put Ruger on the map and Colt jumped back on the band wagon at the end of 1955 with the 2nd gen SAA. Quality of early 2nd gen was very good and I believe some left over parts from the original production were probably used. In the mid 70's Colt tried to reduce production costs and the 3rd gen was born. An example of such was replacing the removable cylinder bushing with a fixed one. Quality of 3rd gen's was spotty at best. The Cowboy Action craze helped generate demand for SAA's but the cost of a Colt and durability issues when compared to a Ruger single action limited sales Sounds like the Python saga. I must say that nothing feels like a Colt SAA in the hand but I sort of feel that time has finally passed it by. IIRC an original 1873 Colt SAA cost was a 20 dollar gold piece. Today a one oz US bullion gold coin will get you a new Colt SAA.

Bawana jim
October 24, 2017, 23:14
A lot of fine crafted guns are considered obsolete, Lugars, browning high powers, Colt SAA and before long the 1911 will be declared obsolete too. The double action revolver is obsolete and it seems that all but the Tupperware is. Those guns can still be used as they were made for even though the gun fighters say they are no longer the best tool.

It's like a 68 Nova, obsolete but still a fine ride. Colt SAA guns are the classic that most guys will never own but that's the way it should be. Fine guns are there for those who really appreciate them:biggrin:

easttex
October 25, 2017, 12:42
Rumor has it Colt is down to one man building their SAA and they are not taking any orders in the custom shop. If they fold up then look for prices on the SAA to climb like the Pythons did. Again them folding is just a rumor but I certianly am glad I got mine allready.:biggrin: It's not a rumor that they won't take any custom shop orders on the SAA, but they are taking custom shop orders on their 1911s

Sounds like the military contracts for AR rifles have dried up. I thought that was the only thing keeping Colt afloat?

Bawana jim
October 25, 2017, 12:57
Sounds like the military contracts for AR rifles have dried up. I thought that was the only thing keeping Colt afloat?

They sell a lot of 1911s.

Retired Bum
October 25, 2017, 15:24
The M1911 has been declared "obsolete" by any number of so called gun mavens since the end of the 2nd world war.

If this were the case then why do so many handgun producers crank them out in many variations and why do they sell well?

My last handgun purchase was a NIB Colt M1911 100th Anniversary Model. The M1911 will still be produced long after I kick the bucket.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

Bawana jim
October 25, 2017, 16:14
The M1911 has been declared "obsolete" by any number of so called gun mavens since the end of the 2nd world war.

If this were the case then why do so many handgun producers crank them out in many variations and why do they sell well?

My last handgun purchase was a NIB Colt M1911 100th Anniversary Model. The M1911 will still be produced long after I kick the bucket.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

The 1911 is viewed by the tuperware commandos as obsolete but just like the SAA it will just keep doing what it was designed for in the hands of good men. I love em just like I do the Colt SAA, all those guns are works of art. Deal is that time is comming they won't be made.

raubvogel
October 27, 2017, 08:28
The M1911 has been declared "obsolete" by any number of so called gun mavens since the end of the 2nd world war.

If this were the case then why do so many handgun producers crank them out in many variations and why do they sell well?

My last handgun purchase was a NIB Colt M1911 100th Anniversary Model. The M1911 will still be produced long after I kick the bucket.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

That actually reminds my thread on when the 1911 Cult (which people still do not get it has nothing to do with quality or accuracy) started. While the Colt SAA has a cult following, even if Colt itself stops making it, someone else will. Of course the Colt-branded ones will go up in price.

With that said, didn't cold dump all their (original) revolver tooling after WWII after deciding the future was 1911 and other semiautos?

lew
October 27, 2017, 12:20
The M1911 has been declared "obsolete" by any number of so called gun mavens since the end of the 2nd world war.

If this were the case then why do so many handgun producers crank them out in many variations and why do they sell well?


"Obsolete" does not necessarily mean "unserviceable.":rolleyes: It's a fine pistol, and the product of a vastly different time. However, nothing about a 1911 is cutting edge: It's on the heavy and large side of the spectrum, and has a laughably low capacity. The trigger can be made to be unbeatable and all that mass makes for low recoil. Still, it's a sub-par choice for a modern combat pistol.

Bawana jim
October 27, 2017, 12:54
"Obsolete" does not necessarily mean "unserviceable.":rolleyes: It's a fine pistol, and the product of a vastly different time. However, nothing about a 1911 is cutting edge: It's on the heavy and large side of the spectrum, and has a laughably low capacity. The trigger can be made to be unbeatable and all that mass makes for low recoil. Still, it's a sub-par choice for a modern combat pistol.

I guess it would be laughable on magazine capacity if you are John Wick with hundreds of people trying to kill you.:biggrin: What is funny is those who decry the magazine capacity as too small carry a 5 shot revolver a lot. Oh but five shots is enough in most cases:biggrin:

Only trigger even close to that of a 1911 is a model 52 smith. When it comes to accuracy the average 1911 is right there with the rest of the pack and in its Colt light weight commander version it's 24 Oz plus bullets added. I never feel I am at a disadvantage when I carry my Colt 1911. Plus dumb as it sounds, for the all important first shot I wouldn't feel disadvantaged carrying my 44 special SAA. it's a loser in an extended fight but on the first round that gets the ball rolling it's a mighty fast accurate gun.

Might point out that other guns are not modern to today's warfare but have taken the toll on the enemy in a big way. Bolt action rifles wouldn't be what you enter a building with but they sure have done a job in their role today. Low mag capacity and slow rate of fire but accurate as can be.:D

tdb59
October 27, 2017, 14:51
With that said, didn't cold dump all their (original) revolver tooling after WWII after deciding the future was 1911 and other semiautos?

No.

The SAA was back in production in 1956 with very slight differences from the smokeless pre-WW2 models.

The Double Action models just got prettier.

.....

Bawana jim
October 27, 2017, 16:00
That actually reminds my thread on when the 1911 Cult (which people still do not get it has nothing to do with quality or accuracy) started. While the Colt SAA has a cult following, even if Colt itself stops making it, someone else will. Of course the Colt-branded ones will go up in price.

With that said, didn't cold dump all their (original) revolver tooling after WWII after deciding the future was 1911 and other semiautos?

Colt brought back the SAA in the fifties as the second generation then went on to make more changes to call it the 3rd generation. About the 1990s they got their act back together and went back to a second Gen gun for the most part which they still make today. Anyway the revolver has been made since 1873 except during war time.

The do have a new Colt cobra out now but it's the only snake gun they offer. I speculate so what I am about to say can't be proven is that with mim parts comming in at 1989 the fine parts of the Colt revolvers just couldn't be produced useing mim. Colts were hand fit.

Their 1911s could be built with mim as so many others are today but it's just drop in parts that require little fitting.

Retired Bum
October 27, 2017, 16:43
By 1941 the Colt SAA was considered obsolete by the factory and only shipped new revolvers when ordered. Then after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor the Colt armory went into war production is a big way.

In order to make room for the expanded production all of the SAA production machinery was removed from the factory floor. But there was no room in any of the warehouses to store it. So the machinery was moved to an unused back parking lot and then covered with canvas tarps for the duration of the war.

After the war somebody remembered about the SAA machine tools sitting on that parking lot. An inspection was made and it was found that all of the machine tools were rusted beyond repair. This was of no concern to the Colt exec's because they weren't going to put the SAA pack into production anyway. So the machinery was hauled off and sold for scrap metal.

But as has been stated when western movies and TV shows became so popular in the early 1950's Colt decided to acquire new machine tooling and put the 2nd generation SAA into production. Made in just two calibers at first. The .45 Colt and the .38 Special. Later came the .357 Magnum and the .44 Special.

A co worker and shooting pal of mine showed me a 1956 made .38 Special that he had acquired recently. I lusted after it and tried to buy or trade it away from him. But no deal. It had the color case hardened frame and the 4 3/4 inch barrel. Later on he did sell it to acquire something else he wanted. But not to me.....

And so it goes.


The Retired One

Bawana jim
October 28, 2017, 09:56
The SAA is a work of art and it's still a fair tool if need be. Folks tend to discount revolvers as being obsolete but when you see them used by the likes of Jerry Mcleck you see the real possibilities with the guns. Ya no doubt autos are better but I would still rather be armed with a big bore revolver than a small bore auto. Colts are on the way out and may never be made again in my lifetime.

hueyville
November 01, 2017, 10:42
(Trim)
When a popular firearm gets too pricey for most buyers then its days are numbered. Just look at the HK P7 series. The Swiss and German P210's. The Mauser Parabellum. I paid $1100 for my SAA but I haven't kept up with prices. I should probably sell it one of these days. Let someone else enjoy it.
And so it goes.
The Retired One

P7 squeeze cocker was first real 9mm handgun ever purchased following an M10/9 because everybody was supposed to have at least a couple MAC 10's in the late '70's, early '80's. Bought the P7 senior year of high school as conceale so well and was intimidating when it came out and went "click" with authority. Felt might get enough attention to compel someone they didn't want to engage in violence but not draw undue attention considering was in school building. Luckily in 70's and into early '81 when graduated was in a private school which didn't have a no firearms policy. Was not uncommon for Juniors and Seniors to have a handgun in car or locker and a few carried.

Retired Bum
November 01, 2017, 15:48
My P7M8 was made in 1992 (KC date code) and purchased by me NIB in 1993. The dealer had a hard time moving it because it had the factory dull nickel finish. So he offered it to me at a ten percent discount. I walked out of the shop with it for $900 plus tax.

Bought two more magazines from CDNN for just over $100 shipped. I still have the P7M8 and every once in a while put 50 rounds of my hand loaded FMJ through it. Even with the plastic heat shield it gets a bit warm around the trigger guard after 50 rounds.

I keep the P7 because of it's uniqueness. Like a Luger, there just isn't anything else quite like it. I wonder what the going price for my P7 would be today with all four magazines and the box, manual, and tools.....

And so it goes.


The Retired One

Bawana jim
November 01, 2017, 17:58
I bought the PSP and four mags some years ago. Gun was $500 and each mag was $50 back then. Got the papers and box but no tool plus this model has no heat shield so it gets hot. Gun has a fantastic trigger and shoots straighter than I can hold. One day I will trade it for a Colt SAA, nothing like a good Colt.:wink: