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jsparky1983
September 13, 2017, 18:09
Hey folks I'm trying to determine if this bolt has been ground on by century. To me it doesn't appear to have been but I'd like more knowledgeable oppnions. It comes out of one of their sporter metric receiver/inch parts rifles. Thank you in advance.

Jon

https://imgur.com/a/hnDhZ

Oops. Moderators please move to L1A1 section.

lew
September 13, 2017, 18:42
Looks like typical wear to me.

Johnaski
September 13, 2017, 19:03
looks like my Brit L1A1 bolt. Why do you think they would grind down a L1A1 bolt? As opposed to just putting the correct locking shoulder in.

the gman
September 13, 2017, 19:38
looks like my Brit L1A1 bolt. Why do you think they would grind down a L1A1 bolt? As opposed to just putting the correct locking shoulder in.

Ah, grasshopper, your knowledge of the fabled gun monkeys of Century must be sparse. :uhoh: Century, back in the day, were all about getting the guns out of the door, regardless of quality or fitness for purpose. I think they banked on most buyers cranking out about 20 rounds or so then storing them in the safe for the next 20 or 30 years... :eek::eek: It would not surprise me one bit if they ground on a bolt to make it fit if they didn't happen to have the right size locking shoulder to hand.

However, that is absolutely normal wear and tear on a very well used bolt.

jsparky1983
September 14, 2017, 12:58
Thanks for the responses guys. I appreciate it.

308/223shooter
September 14, 2017, 14:38
Looks usable to me. You want to see worn out bolts? If I can find it, I've one I pulled from a mates fresh bought Century L1A1. The locking surface looks like it was beat on with a hammer. I'll post a pic later.

4x401
September 14, 2017, 15:20
looks like my Brit L1A1 bolt. Why do you think they would grind down a L1A1 bolt? As opposed to just putting the correct locking shoulder in.

:spew:



However, that is absolutely normal wear and tear on a very well used bolt.

Well used is right! :eek:

That locking shoulder cam looks pretty damn deep. I'd be curious what size locking shoulder it uses...

Johnaski
September 14, 2017, 21:30
The only bolts I have ever heard of Century grinding down were their early cetme rifles in the 2000's. Again, why would they grind down a fal bolt? What would that help them with? I have a C308 that's fine. I have a C93 that's fine. I've had Century AKs that have been fine, nothing ground on.

munchoman
September 15, 2017, 04:58
The only bolts I have ever heard of Century grinding down were their early cetme rifles in the 2000's. Again, why would they grind down a fal bolt? What would that help them with? I have a C308 that's fine. I have a C93 that's fine. I've had Century AKs that have been fine, nothing ground on.

I have replaced at least one L1A1 bolt that Century put to the bench grinder. No need to ask why, its just the way they operate

gunplumber
September 15, 2017, 09:32
Good to Go.

I have a dozen bolts here that the Drunken Monkeys (incompetent hacks) at CAI ground on. While I could TIG weld and regrind, I am not confident of the wear characteristics after having done so.

Key on that one is the micro pitting. shows it is the original surface. Although with the lighting it almost looks like HC.

lostmybearing
September 15, 2017, 14:34
I have had both L1A1 and C93 bolts that were ground upon by the CAI "gunsmiths". The C93 looked like it was ground with some precision. The FAL bolt looked like a dremel was taken to it.

Johnaski
September 16, 2017, 19:50
Why would they grind the bolts when they could just replace the locking shoylder? That' just stupid.

gunplumber
September 17, 2017, 10:07
Perhaps they did not have the right size locking shoulder?

Eventually, they figured they could machine a locking shoulder to the necessary size.

Except they were cut so badly that those are unserviceable as well. At least a locking shoulder is easier to replace than a bolt.

308/223shooter
September 17, 2017, 23:39
How's this for a worn bolt. Pulled from a mates SLR, which was a running rifle that began to split brass.http://i.imgur.com/RrrACCsm.jpg (https://imgur.com/RrrACCs)http://i.imgur.com/qbiqdbDm.jpg (https://imgur.com/qbiqdbD)

palmettomoon
September 18, 2017, 06:27
Why would they grind the bolts when they could just replace the locking shoylder? That' just stupid.

I've wondered why they milled the charging handle slots on Type III Imbel receivers too. Why wouldn't they milled the charging handle instead? I think with Century you can ask "why" just about anything they do/did/dooded.

hueyville
September 18, 2017, 08:33
My personal theory for buying Century rifles is lightly used rifles that functioned properly and without blowing up on original owner. Product experimentation done, depreciation hit (if a Century can become less valuable) already taken and do a darn good inspection before buying. If seller won't let me take it down and do some measurements, check go/no go, and make sure looks like came from good kit I move on along unless so cheap repairs are covered on front end. Have multiple Century rifles and by being careful all are good. Seen new come into LGS had to be sent back before put on shelf and quite a few original purchaser returns as non functioning for warranty work. Warranty rifles are the scariest, appears to me that department does whatever they feel is easiest way to force it to function whether it's with a grinder, dremel or welder.

gunplumber
September 18, 2017, 09:03
I've wondered why they milled the charging handle slots on Type III Imbel receivers too. Why wouldn't they milled the charging handle instead? I think with Century you can ask "why" just about anything they do/did/dooded.

Why wouldn't they? It was a standard and correct cut for an L1A1. I think IMBEL did it as specified by CAI. Same with the receiver cover cut

palmettomoon
September 18, 2017, 10:28
Why wouldn't they? It was a standard and correct cut for an L1A1. I think IMBEL did it as specified by CAI. Same with the receiver cover cut I get that, just seems half way there when no other cuts were made externally. I am not a manufacturer. They did what was most expedient and least costly I'm sure. Fitting a receiver to a kit rather than a kit to a receiver. Mag notch and dust cover aside, I do wonder how much extra it would have cost them them specify lightening cuts (if possible) to create a closer clone to an L1A1 receiver.