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the gman
July 15, 2017, 14:56
Enjoy! :biggrin::shades:

http://all-that-is-interesting.com/the-troubles

preban336
July 15, 2017, 16:35
Enjoy! :biggrin::shades:

http://all-that-is-interesting.com/the-troubles

Thank you for sharing the link with us. It was a terrible situation for many years.

Striker1423
July 17, 2017, 11:42
Thank you for sharing the link with us. It was a terrible situation for many years.

Was?

My understanding is The Troubles still rears its ugly head from time to time. I'd say it's far from being over.

VALMET
July 17, 2017, 11:59
I just got back from spending three weeks over there (N Ireland and the republic). While three weeks is but a snapshot, id say that there is some definite tension that still exists in certain areas between Protestants and Catholics but nothing like it was between 69-97. Belfast is a pretty cool city

Slo cat
July 17, 2017, 13:51
George,
You were there, weren’t you?

Stu
July 17, 2017, 14:23
jeebus.... I see some M60s in there. How did those end up there? :confused:

I can understand how IRA ended up with GPMGs (raided from armoury?), Armalites and AR15s from USA. But real M60s? Are those AR15s or are they M16s?

enbloc8
July 17, 2017, 14:29
jeebus.... I see some M60s in there. How did those end up there? :confused:

I can understand how IRA ended up with GPMGs (raided from armoury?), Armalites and AR15s from USA. But real M60s? Are those AR15s or are they M16s?

They were also supplied with ARs (originating from Vietnam) by the KGB in the 1970s, using underwater "dead drop" deliveries from Soviet "survey vessels". I'd bet the M60s came the same way.

preban336
July 17, 2017, 17:06
Was?

My understanding is The Troubles still rears its ugly head from time to time. I'd say it's far from being over.


Very true...

the gman
July 18, 2017, 22:15
George,
You were there, weren’t you?


I was. :angel: Not in the era of the SLR but my brother was there for over 20 years from the SLR through the introduction of the L85A1 aka SA80. The L85A1 was much better suited to vehicle and heli borne operations which were our daily bread over there.

There was (and still is to a certain extent) a vitriolic minority on both the Catholic and Protestant sides who preach extreme violence against the other. The easiest way to explain how Catholics were treated prior to the start of the troubles is think of blacks in the 1960's in the USA. Segregation, poor housing, poor job opportunities, lynchings, beatings and much more. The parallels are astounding when you compare the two groups.

After the ceasefires of 1994 and 1997, the vast majority of people in Northern Ireland were now aware of what relatively 'normal' life was like and they wanted more of it. The number of tips to the confidential hot line, set up to specifically target terrorist activity, went through the roof and the security forces gained valuable intel on what both the Catholic and Loyalist terrorists were up to. This intel, along with existing penetration of the terrorist organizations by informers, electronic surveillance, human intelligence gathering and targeted military operations effectively limited the ability of the terrorists to operate as freely as before.

The vast majority of the NI population were heartily sick of the open violence, the sectarian murders, the bombings and the intrusion of the government into their lives. While there were, and are, long held animosities between Catholics and Protestants, it doesn't rise to the level of violence. I'd compare it to the feelings of some in the south towards the north as a result of the war of northern aggression... :wink:

These days, while the terrorists on both sides are still there, they have mostly moved into crime. There are a few hold outs who hang on to the old ways but they are slowly dying out. I loved my time in Northern Ireland but I'm glad for the local population that things have changed for the better.

hueyville
July 19, 2017, 20:24
(Trim)
I'd compare it to the feelings of some in the south towards the north as a result of the war of northern aggression... :wink:


Like it when an expat knows the proper terminology for the history of country resides. :snoopy:

Incognito
July 20, 2017, 10:09
I was. :angel: Not in the era of the SLR but my brother was there for over 20 years from the SLR through the introduction of the L85A1 aka SA80. The L85A1 was much better suited to vehicle and heli borne operations which were our daily bread over there.

There was (and still is to a certain extent) a vitriolic minority on both the Catholic and Protestant sides who preach extreme violence against the other. The easiest way to explain how Catholics were treated prior to the start of the troubles is think of blacks in the 1960's in the USA. Segregation, poor housing, poor job opportunities, lynchings, beatings and much more. The parallels are astounding when you compare the two groups.

After the ceasefires of 1994 and 1997, the vast majority of people in Northern Ireland were now aware of what relatively 'normal' life was like and they wanted more of it. The number of tips to the confidential hot line, set up to specifically target terrorist activity, went through the roof and the security forces gained valuable intel on what both the Catholic and Loyalist terrorists were up to. This intel, along with existing penetration of the terrorist organizations by informers, electronic surveillance, human intelligence gathering and targeted military operations effectively limited the ability of the terrorists to operate as freely as before.

The vast majority of the NI population were heartily sick of the open violence, the sectarian murders, the bombings and the intrusion of the government into their lives. While there were, and are, long held animosities between Catholics and Protestants, it doesn't rise to the level of violence. I'd compare it to the feelings of some in the south towards the north as a result of the war of northern aggression... :wink:

These days, while the terrorists on both sides are still there, they have mostly moved into crime. There are a few hold outs who hang on to the old ways but they are slowly dying out. I loved my time in Northern Ireland but I'm glad for the local population that things have changed for the better.

Very interesting perspective. What years were you there?

lew
July 21, 2017, 12:05
Very cool. Thanks for the link and the narrative, gman.