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Northwoods
February 06, 2017, 19:50
How long can a 30 round AR 15 mag spring retain its force when kept loaded?
Thanks Bruce

rowjimmy
February 06, 2017, 20:13
How long can a 30 round AR 15 mag spring retain its force when kept loaded?
Thanks Bruce

<a href="https://imgflip.com/i/1j4ahp"><img src="https://i.imgflip.com/1j4ahp.jpg" title="made at imgflip.com"/></a>

Just kidding. Prevailing metallurgical wisdom says the spring is only worked/stressed when stretching and compressing. This would lead to fatigue and reduction of the spring constant, in theory.There should be no problem with leaving it loaded indefinitely.

I'm sure someone will be along in a minute to contradict what I just told you.

hueyville
February 06, 2017, 20:19
Varies according to materials, tempering and how full you stuff it. Chrome silicone springs last a long time and are highly resistant to memory from keeping loaded. Keep 25 rounds in my 30 round 5.56 magazines and 20 rounds in my 25 round 6.8 magazines to keep from fully compressing springs and reduce weight of my magazine pouches that hold six magazines. Generally will either shoot them dry and load another set for SHTF or unload by hand then stuff another set twice a year. Idea of loading a magazine and leaving for years then expecting it to work is sketchy.


Tapco used to make a 40 round magazine that worked with AR15's and Mini 14's, claimed could load with 30 and store forever without damage. Remember were smoke grey plastic like Lancer's but plastic feedlips. Loaded up three and every one split downthe sonically welded seam on back after a few years. Found a box of them had forgotten about still in original wrappers, started using and all split pretty quickly. Now I buy ASC stainless magazines with anti-tilt followers, the high lubricity Marlube coating inside, chrome silicon springs and have no issues with them. Pmags and most plastic magazines are for the other guy except Lancer's with their metal feedlips.

Northwoods
February 06, 2017, 21:43
Sorry to repeat a question.

rowjimmy
February 06, 2017, 21:51
Sorry to repeat a question.

No, it's a valid question. I don't think you'll find a definitive answer, most of the folks I know and respect on the board , and my own background in physics, leads me to think it's OK to leave 'em loaded.

Hueyville (and others) will disagree.

I was just kidding.

308/223shooter
February 06, 2017, 22:06
I've left 30 rounders loaded for over a year, with no issues. These are milspec mags, not aftermarket.

Tuscan Raider
February 06, 2017, 22:15
Using them weakens the springs.
Not using them doesn't.

Bert762
February 06, 2017, 22:50
I do not believe the spring will be an issue as much as the lips of aluminum magazines may expand, thus why pmags with covers are popular for that purpose. Covers take the pressure off of feed lips. Having said that I have not had a problem with milspec aluminum, but have experienced issues with Israeli plastic mags left loaded and having the feed lips expand. Now this is not scientific, just my personal observations. The only magazines I leave loaded anymore are pmags loaded with 29 rounds. Reason for 29 rounds, easier to seat than 30 with the bolt closed on a round. Rember no science, just my personal experience over 35 years, others may have different experiences.

michael_g927
February 07, 2017, 00:16
Hueyville is right. The ASC/CPD stainless mags are awesome! The spring and orange followers are second to none. In my attempt to build an awesome hotrod mag, I used the stainless mag body with a CMMG triple wound stainless steel spring and their stainless steel follower.
So afterwards I had 20 new ASC/CPD springs and orange followers left over. So I rebuilt 20 USGI mags with them. Best mags ever! If CPD ever decides to sell just the followers and Springs, magpul will be in real trouble!

jhend170
February 07, 2017, 09:39
Long as it was legit spring steel to begin with duty cycles kill springs, not sitting in 1 position, unless of course that position is in a damp place and your spring rusts, but that's not a function of a problem with the spring.

I have a lot of loaded magazines for firearms of all price ranges, milsurp and civi market, and have never had a spring fail that wasn't from excessive use. excessive non-use has yet to prove itself a problem. As always though, ymmv.

W.E.G.
February 07, 2017, 09:52
87 days

GOVT1911
February 07, 2017, 11:58
87 days

You Sir, are correct for the OLD mags. Newer Gen 5 mags are good for 101 days. ;)

Pluribus
February 07, 2017, 12:13
They are good to go until they're not and, that's as good as it gets. Then, you'll know for sure.

YMMV, IMHO.

:smile:

hueyville
February 07, 2017, 16:41
I do not believe the spring will be an issue as much as the lips of aluminum magazines may expand, thus why pmags with covers are popular for that purpose. Covers take the pressure off of feed lips. Having said that I have not had a problem with milspec aluminum, but have experienced issues with Israeli plastic mags left loaded and having the feed lips expand. Now this is not scientific, just my personal observations. The only magazines I leave loaded anymore are pmags loaded with 29 rounds. Reason for 29 rounds, easier to seat than 30 with the bolt closed on a round. Rember no science, just my personal experience over 35 years, others may have different experiences.

^^^^^This^^^^^
What I tried to say, the feed lips go first, seams go next on plastic. I figure less rounds mean less pressure and weight. I will start loading them to the brim when actually see my first zombie in person. I believe the AR Stoner stainless magazines Midway sells are ASC with different color follower. But Stainless with chrome silicone springs I would not hesitate to stuff full, its just those last few make my arthritic thumbs hurt. Truck rifle is loaded to 28 rounds and only shot empty once a year on average and never misses a beat after living behind seat of truck in varied temperature and dirty environment of a work truck.

rowjimmy
February 07, 2017, 17:42
...Truck rifle is loaded to 28 rounds ....

Another issue, aside from the spring, is how the mags behave when loaded. I have C Products mags that will only seat on a closed bolt if 28 rnds or less, my D&H seat on a closed bolt with 30 rnds in no problem.

Pluribus
February 07, 2017, 18:53
Another issue, aside from the spring, is how the mags behave when loaded. I have C Products mags that will only seat on a closed bolt if 28 rnds or less, my D&H seat on a closed bolt with 30 rnds in no problem.

Store with the bolt open, full(30rd) mag inserted, e-door closed, safe on. Acquire, bump bolt release, decide if you need safety on/off and engage as needed.

You know?

:shades:

rowjimmy
February 07, 2017, 19:40
Store with the bolt open, full(30rd) mag inserted, e-door closed, safe on. Acquire, bump bolt release, decide if you need safety on/off and engage as needed.

You know?

:shades:

My defensive rifle is loaded, as it should be. Sometimes in three gun, you start with the bolt closed on an empty chamber, mag inserted. You can guess how that might turn out. :rofl:

hueyville
February 07, 2017, 23:25
I don't worry about running out at 25, 28 or 30. If crap is that deep and live till time to reload then hope you have plenty of spare magazines. Truck rifle is a short XM177 clone with irons and behind console is mag pouch with six spare mags loaded 25 rounds. If 178 don't get me home, odds are 210 won't. Today threw a 6.8 in the truck also, carry one so often console has four 15 round 6.8 mags nestled in convenient recess. Load each with 13 rounds of Hornady 110 grain tipped bullets and rifle has 25 round magazine with 20 total rounds of 6.8. So 72 rounds of 6.8 through rifle with can then 178 of 5.56, go to SIG 40 on belt with 3 spare mags racked for 44 total and two spare mags in console plus a 5 shot 44 special under seat with three speed loaders in front change tray of console. Had one of my SIG 9mm's with Osprey can in briefcase and two spare magazines. In toolbox is an MTM magazine box with ten spare magazines of 5.56 and five of 6.8. Have to get calculator running to do all that math but at least two rifles, three handguns and somewhere on order of 34 rifle magazines, 9 pistol and 3 speed loaders. If all are a few rounds short and die cause one round short it was my day, eh? If wanted to stuff bullets in mags while fighting was taking 500 rounds of 45 to work (no 45 in truck, oops.) 200 rounds of 40 and 300 rounds of 9mm but only went one way as unloaded for work range when got to office.

kev
February 08, 2017, 11:00
Store with the bolt open, full(30rd) mag inserted, e-door closed, safe on. Acquire, bump bolt release, decide if you need safety on/off and engage as needed.

You know?

:shades:

How long can a AR 15 recoil spring retain its force with the carrier kept open?

hueyville
February 08, 2017, 15:43
How long can a AR 15 recoil spring retain its force with the carrier kept open?

Longer than the magazine spring lasts??? I use Tubbs Flatwire chrome silicone recoil springs so doubt will ever wear one out in a poodle shooter.

Pluribus
February 08, 2017, 17:30
How long can a AR 15 recoil spring retain its force with the carrier kept open?

Finally, some one caught the bait of diversion. See above post. The same rule applies.

They are good to go until they're not and, that's as good as it gets. Then, you'll know for sure.


Like a car engine, it's perfectly fine until you turn the key. Then you'll know.

:biggrin:

rowjimmy
February 08, 2017, 20:24
Finally, some one caught the bait of diversion. See above post. The same rule applies.

...:

I see. Went right by me.

Pluribus
February 08, 2017, 21:46
I see. Went right by me.

We all gotta digress some time!

:]

BUFF
February 08, 2017, 23:45
I kept both handgun and Colt branded AR-15 mags, fully loaded, in the trunk of my patrol car. When I retired, I shot up the AR mags and some of the pistol mags. The AR mags had been loaded for 7 years, as had the Glock 9 and .40 mags, S&W 4006 mags and Beretta 92 mags.

Every mag and the ammo in them functioned just fine.

1769
February 09, 2017, 06:23
I don't worry about running out at 25, 28 or 30. If crap is that deep and live till time to reload then hope you have plenty of spare magazines. Truck rifle is a short XM177 clone with irons and behind console is mag pouch with six spare mags loaded 25 rounds. If 178 don't get me home, odds are 210 won't. Today threw a 6.8 in the truck also, carry one so often console has four 15 round 6.8 mags nestled in convenient recess. Load each with 13 rounds of Hornady 110 grain tipped bullets and rifle has 25 round magazine with 20 total rounds of 6.8. So 72 rounds of 6.8 through rifle with can then 178 of 5.56, go to SIG 40 on belt with 3 spare mags racked for 44 total and two spare mags in console plus a 5 shot 44 special under seat with three speed loaders in front change tray of console. Had one of my SIG 9mm's with Osprey can in briefcase and two spare magazines. In toolbox is an MTM magazine box with ten spare magazines of 5.56 and five of 6.8. Have to get calculator running to do all that math but at least two rifles, three handguns and somewhere on order of 34 rifle magazines, 9 pistol and 3 speed loaders. If all are a few rounds short and die cause one round short it was my day, eh? If wanted to stuff bullets in mags while fighting was taking 500 rounds of 45 to work (no 45 in truck, oops.) 200 rounds of 40 and 300 rounds of 9mm but only went one way as unloaded for work range when got to office.

IDK, but if you need all that to get home from work. I'd consider relocating, to,,,, anywhere else. but there.

hueyville
February 09, 2017, 08:13
IDK, but if you need all that to get home from work. I'd consider relocating, to,,,, anywhere else. but there.

Have 60' indoor range at work, go by rifle range working twice a week on average. Shoot almost every day. Already run a box of 50 9mm through my SIG 9mm suppressed pistol getting used to Osprey can on front this morning, one light can. Tomorrow will be installing in field and within three miles of WMA range for one location. Probably stick several rifles in truck need scopes confirmed. Muled 500 rounds of 45 to work this morning that fell off Dillon last night. Will take shoot breaks at lunch and end of work day if nothing crops up have to attend to out of shop. Not expecting zombie hord on eight mile commute. Just have luxury of setting own schedule and enjoy shooting.

Pluribus
February 09, 2017, 18:07
I kept both handgun and Colt branded AR-15 mags, fully loaded, in the trunk of my patrol car. When I retired, I shot up the AR mags and some of the pistol mags. The AR mags had been loaded for 7 years, as had the Glock 9 and .40 mags, S&W 4006 mags and Beretta 92 mags.

Every mag and the ammo in them functioned just fine.

That's a good testimonial. Present that to Colt, Glock, Beretta and, S&W and maybe they'll send you a fat endorsement check(s) or, maybe a bunch of blamo for those proven, duty magazines.

:deal:


:thumbsup:

kev
February 09, 2017, 19:36
I kept both handgun and Colt branded AR-15 mags, fully loaded, in the trunk of my patrol car. When I retired, I shot up the AR mags and some of the pistol mags. The AR mags had been loaded for 7 years, as had the Glock 9 and .40 mags, S&W 4006 mags and Beretta 92 mags.

Every mag and the ammo in them functioned just fine.

How long can the compressed magazine springs retain their force with you shooting at them?

ftierson
February 09, 2017, 20:15
How long can the compressed magazine springs retain their force with you shooting at them?

:)

Forrest

BUFF
February 10, 2017, 02:31
Tough audience.

hueyville
February 10, 2017, 07:31
How long can the compressed magazine springs retain their force with you shooting at them?

Imagine if miss then no impact at all. We going back to the Western movie plot of shooting the gun out of bad guys hand but in this case the magazine out of the rifle?

STG_58_guy
February 10, 2017, 21:55
I can't tell you anything about specific mags but I can tell you the engineering questions behind your question.

First, there are three critical components: the spring, the follower, and the body of the mag including the feed lips. Let's start with the sping.

Assume there are no mechanical defects in the sping, like nicks, voids, or inclusions in the wire itself. These would act as stress raisers and would greatly reduce the working life of the spring. Most springs are free of such defects.

Assume the sping is free of corrosion. Any corrosion on the surface of the spring will greatly reduce its working life.

Assume the spring has been worked to near it full compression several times to remove inherent hysteresis. Any normal length of spring wire will have defects or weak spots in its crystalline structure. When you compress the sping near its working limits, the most suseptable of these defects move, causing a permanent change in the shape and response of the spring. The second time the spring is compressed to near its working limit, more defects will move, but far fewer than the first attempt. And so with the third and fourth. However, with a well designed spring, the changes should be very small, and after just a few compressions, the changes should be undetectable. Indeed, this is what defines a well designed spring. By design, the inherent defects are so few, and so resistant to moving, that under the stresses the spring will endure by design, only a few will move, once moved, they will not move again, and the remaining defects can't be moved. Exceed the design criteria of your spring and these residual defects will move, they will move a lot, and your spring will be ruined.

To sumarize, the first time someone fully compresses a spring it will get a little shorter, and will push back a little less the second time than the first. For a really well designed spring, it may be almost impossible to determine this change, but it always occurs. This effect is less each time the spring is compressed to its working load and for practical purposes disappears after justa few compressions. This idea also illuminates a quality of several material properties, namely that they are dependent on the mechanical history of the material, not just the material itself. The stiffness value E and fatigue life of metals are examples. Google "work hardening".

Assuming the spring is well designed and few crystal defects will move under the design stress, the second factor to consider is creep. All normal engineering materials creep. This is a change of shape that occurs under load over time. Certainly, a compressed spring meets these critera. Those defects in the crytal that did not move under the working stress of the spring will occasionally slip if the total energy at that location exceeds some limit. The stress in the spring alone is not enough. But there are other sources of energy, including thermal energy, transient shock, and even cosmic rays hitting in just the wrong spot, that when combined with the highly stressed state of a loaded spring, make the defects move. Creep is usually slow but it always occurs. The hotter a material, and the higher the stress the faster it occurs. Creep will permanently change the shape of a spring and make it push back less than it originally did.

A properly designed metalic spring produced with quality material and used within its design load at reasonable temperatures could remain compressed for thousands of years with no ill effect. The question for your magazine spring is "does it meet all those criteria?"

The most common failure mode for springs operating within their design limits is fatigue. This is a dynamic, not a static consideration. No physical part is perfect. They all have macroscopic defects. These are different than the microscopic defects in the crystalline structure discussed above. These are scratches, nicks, or inclusions of contaminants that just happen to occur at critical locations on the part. Corrosion would be a contibutor if present.

Fatigue happens because a large tensile stress occurs during normal operation of the spring at one of these macroscopic defects. The stress is focused at the root of this defect, exceeding the strength of the material only there. A crack develops. Each cycle of stress repeats this process, opening the crack, at its root, just a little farther. The longer the crack, the more stress is focused at its root. It becomes a runaway process. Eventually the crack forces so much stress through the remaining material that it can no longer carry the load, and failure occures.

No spring is immune to this, but well made, well handled springs are highly resistant. Materials that make good springs are particularly susceptible to fatigue because they would rather bend elastically or crack at a high load than bend plastically before local loads got high enough to make them crack. They are brittle materials. All those easily moved microscopic defects have already been moved in a good spring, if they were there to begin with. There is nothing left to give.

If you take a mile long piece of wire and turn it into a million springs, somewhere in that mile of wire there was a macroscopic defect that will cause one of those springs to fail from fatigue well before its design life was over. A few more will fail early. Many will meet their design life. A few will never fail. The fatigue life of a part is also dependent on the history of the part. A single overstress of the spring could greatly reduce its life by starting a crack that otherwise would never get started. Once started, that crack will propagate as the spring is exercised.

A well designed, carefully fabricated, steel spring should have a dynamic lifetime in excess of 10 million cycles. Springs in internal cumbustion engines are designed with an infinite lifetime (although some do occasionally fail, and all would eventually fail). To do this, you need to "over engineer" the spring, which costs money. The spring in your magazine is likely not engineered to last 10 million cycles. Why should it? That would be wasteful.

So lets talk about the magazine body. Many of the same principles discused above apply to the body as well. We can ignore hysteresis, fatigue, and creep in most of the body, but probably not in the feed lips. This is because the stresses in the walls of the magazine body are small, perhaps only 1/1000th those in the spring. But the lips are under some stress.

For metalic magazines, I suspect that the stresses are still so small, that plastic deformation, fatigue, and creep are insignificant. I'm not going to bother with the math. I'm going on engineering judgement, at least with steel and aluminum. If you kept the magazine loaded for 100,000 years I'd be concerned enough to get the books out. The stresses in the spring are orders of magnitude higher than the lip structure so it will fail first anyway.

Plastic mags - not so much. Plastics are also subject to creep and fatigue. The mechanism for fatigue is a little different, and again, I thinks magazines see so few cycles that fatigue is a minor concern. Where springs are highly susceptible to fatigue, plastic parts are not (and you will note that plastics usually make a crappy spring). Creep is the enemy of plastic.

Creep is a slow change in a material's geometry over time, under the infuence of stress and temperature. At temperatures encountered occasionally in human affairs, engineering plastics may creep 1 million times as fast as engineering metals. So an aluminum body FAL mag might last a million years in the trunk of your car in Houston, TX, the feed lips of a thermold mag may only last a year. Or a month. I don't know. I'd have to run numbers and do testing. All I can say without data is that the difference is so vast, that you can't make any claims about the one based on the other.

These are relatively easy and routine tests to perform, so I'm troubled by the fact that they are not. If someone has data on accelerated age testing comparing polymer and metallic magazines, please share it.

Polymer followers would also be subject to creep under severe conditions, but because of the way they are loaded (stressed) I'm less concerned.

To conclude, a well designed, well made, and properly cared for magazine loaded to maximum capacity should be able to remain functional for many lifetimes. The problem is that we have no idea if our particular magazine meets those criteria. Even a reputable manufacturer may have gotten a load of substandard spring wire along the way. There is no way to tell if a magazine spring was damaged by a previous owner. So there is value in downloading a 30 round magazine to 25 rounds. But there is also a cost (5 rounds). If you are storing Magpul magazines in your trunk in Houston, downloading to 20 from 30 seams like a good idea to me, since creep is both temperature and stress related. The idea being that 30 rounds at room temp = 20 rounds at 140 F. Just a guess though. I haven't done a single calculation. Well, not on this problem, but many, many others.

Hope you enjoyed my essay. In the end, you will do what you want.

STG_58_guy
February 10, 2017, 22:16
I want to add two comments.

First, I know there are a number of grammatical and spelling errors above. It is such a pain to go back and correct them wi this tablet, I refuse. Bubba, perhapsyou would do me that solid. See, I added a few more. :cry:

It is possible to specify two springs with exactly the same diameter, free length, and spring constant but differ in cost by 1000x. No shit. The spring in your ball point pen is one example. The spring in an arterial stent being another.

:biggrin:

Edit: I can give an example of a spring that is 1 million times as expensive per unit length than any spring you have ever purchased at a store. Well, that's not true really, because you already own a couple.

rowjimmy
February 10, 2017, 22:53
OK, to summarize STG58's dissertation, let's revisit a few concepts.

First, it is easiest for the sake of discussion to assume springs are ideal, and they obey Hooke's Law. Basically, it is written as F=-kx, where F is the force of the spring, k is the spring constant ( a measure of the stiffness of the spring), and x is the length the spring is displaced from its equilibrium, or relaxed length. This is a good enough model for a rifle magazine. Essentially, the further you stretch a spring, the more force you need to stretch it.

When we look at materials, we consider stress vs. strain curves. If you exceed the linear region (i.e. Hooke's Law), where stress is proportional to strain, you end up in either a region of plastic deformation where you have exceeded its yield strength (please note STG58 uses this term-plastic- twice in two different contexts without differentiating between them, so it would likely be a bit confusing for most folks) which implies the spring is permanently deformed (you have exceeded it's elastic limit) or you may reach it's ultimate strength, where the spring would break. When STG58 refers to plastic mags, he is referring to what are correctly termed "polymer" mags, but I wouldn't expect a mechanical engineer to note this distinction.

So, all of his pontificating aside, when you buy mag, it is possible it has defects which will cause it to perform outside of its design criteria and may fail. However, with good QC, you will never have to worry about any of this. Yes, metallurgical defects can happen, but even cheap mags are pretty reliable. In general, the more you pay for a mag, the better the spring and less likelihood of failure. Don't get bogged down in the BS. Almost any mag can be loaded indefinitely.

Now, if he's really trying to impress you with his intellect, maybe he'll come back and draw a Mohr's Circle.

hueyville
February 11, 2017, 01:50
Use Wison eight round and McCormick ten round magazines in my 1911 single stacks. Wilson reccomends replacing springs every year in heavily used magazines. For my range mags run till start becoming inconsistent locking back slide on last rounds. These see a lot of use and get replaced every two to three years

http://i68.tinypic.com/k33y3c.jpg

Notice the old springs are about 2/3 length of new. Were same length when new but Wilson had not switched to chrome silicon when those replacement kits were purchased. Try to keep a dozen or so magazine rebuild kits around for my high duty cycle mags. Have some pics of AR mags rebuilt a while back with same issue of not engaging bolt lock on last round and when rebuilt springs were obviously compressed a good bit. Will see if can find them. Have to figure out which computer and/or backup external drive they landed in. I go by what I see. I see springs get week and compress in magazines use a lot. Oddly, 20 round battle rifle mags are not as prone to this but don't shoot as much as 1911's or AR's.

STG_58_guy
February 11, 2017, 18:43
OK, to summarize STG58's dissertation, let's revisit a few concepts.

First, it is easiest for the sake of discussion to assume springs are ideal, and they obey Hooke's Law. Basically, it is written as F=-kx, where F is the force of the spring, k is the spring constant ( a measure of the stiffness of the spring), and x is the length the spring is displaced from its equilibrium, or relaxed length. This is a good enough model for a rifle magazine. Essentially, the further you stretch a spring, the more force you need to stretch it.

When we look at materials, we consider stress vs. strain curves. If you exceed the linear region (i.e. Hooke's Law), where stress is proportional to strain, you end up in either a region of plastic deformation where you have exceeded its yield strength (please note STG58 uses this term-plastic- twice in two different contexts without differentiating between them, so it would likely be a bit confusing for most folks) which implies the spring is permanently deformed (you have exceeded it's elastic limit) or you may reach it's ultimate strength, where the spring would break. When STG58 refers to plastic mags, he is referring to what are correctly termed "polymer" mags, but I wouldn't expect a mechanical engineer to note this distinction.

So, all of his pontificating aside, when you buy mag, it is possible it has defects which will cause it to perform outside of its design criteria and may fail. However, with good QC, you will never have to worry about any of this. Yes, metallurgical defects can happen, but even cheap mags are pretty reliable. In general, the more you pay for a mag, the better the spring and less likelihood of failure. Don't get bogged down in the BS. Almost any mag can be loaded indefinitely.

Now, if he's really trying to impress you with his intellect, maybe he'll come back and draw a Mohr's Circle.

That's how a highschool physics teacher tries to play ME.

rowjimmy
February 11, 2017, 20:47
That's how a highschool physics teacher tries to play ME.

No, just summarizing for folks without a degree in ME.

You're kinda defensive. Nobody was playing you. Yes, I made a little joke implying you went into much more detail than folks probably cared about (because you enjoyed what you were talking about and maybe are even passionate about it) and I did joke about you drawing a Mohr's circle. Oh, the horror.

I'm sorry, i didn't realize you were so sensitive. Did you feel as though I was being cruel?

rowjimmy
February 11, 2017, 20:58
That's how a highschool physics teacher tries to play ME.

Wait, it just occurred to me, ME is not capitalized "me," but ME as in mechanical engineer.

You were belittling me and insulting me as my BS in physics is clearly inferior to a BS in ME.

Oh, well played good sir!! I realize you are far superior! I am humbled and embarrassed.

gunseller
February 12, 2017, 11:20
I have some Colt 20 round M16 mags that came home with me over 40 years ago and have been loaded most of the time sense. There were used, of course, when they were handed to me. How used I have no idea but I would not have any problems using them for what they were designed for and yes they have been loaded for most of the 40 plus years I have had them in my position. I also have some plastic Israel 30 round mags that have been loaded for over 20 years and would not have a problem using them to defend myself or my family. I do put them in a rifle every so often to see if they have swelled but so far no problems.
Steve

hkshooter
February 12, 2017, 12:34
I loaded a pile of Thermold mags in 1994, right before the ban. When dad died in 2009 I got them all back.
Yesterday I test fired a rifle I had just modified to test function with one of those loaded mags.
Worked perfectly.
YMMV.

ftierson
February 12, 2017, 13:54
I loaded a pile of Thermold mags in 1994, right before the ban. When dad died in 2009 I got them all back.
Yesterday I test fired a rifle I had just modified to test function with one of those loaded mags.
Worked perfectly.
YMMV.

Just out of curiosity, what limit were the Thermold mags loaded to (actual number of rounds in the mag)?

Forrest

hkshooter
February 12, 2017, 14:02
Just out of curiosity, what limit were the Thermold mags loaded to (actual number of rounds in the mag)?

Forrest

Max. 30.

ftierson
February 12, 2017, 14:54
Max. 30.

Thanks...

Forrest

Pluribus
February 12, 2017, 17:35
I loaded a pile of Thermold mags in 1994, right before the ban. When dad died in 2009 I got them all back.
Yesterday I test fired a rifle I had just modified to test function with one of those loaded mags.
Worked perfectly.
YMMV.

Cool to know. We are actually learning in this thread.

:smile:

Never stop learning I say. As long as I can understand what the farg d'er, eh?

TnHawk-45
February 13, 2017, 18:51
I always leave my mags fully loaded. Only ones I have ever had a problem with was the expensive Steel H&K mags. After only being loaded 6 months for me, they got weak and started jamming and loosing rounds out of them.

They were sold SOON after that. NEXT DAY!

ByronF
February 15, 2017, 16:56
Shit. I have mousetraps in the crawl space. I wont sleep tonight thinking about the springs. Bastards probably having a dance party on my traps.

W.E.G.
February 15, 2017, 18:21
I always leave my mags fully loaded...

Said a man who either has too few mags, or too much ammo.

rowjimmy
February 15, 2017, 18:23
... or too much ammo.

This, is impossible.

hueyville
February 18, 2017, 19:37
Said a man who either has too few mags, or too much ammo.

Couldn't imagine pulling all cases of N.I.B. magazines out of stockpile and stuffing bullets in just to be doing. Each AR out of vault has six pack of loaded magazines dedicated to it in milspec mag pouch. That's seven mags per rifle with usually a half dozen out of vaults at a time. Besides if busted open sealed packaging of stockpiled ammo to put in magazines it would start tarnishing.

Have an MTM box with 15 slots cut in foam for magazines. Sits on side of bed would roll to if zombies got in house. Have a 16" W.O.A. barreled rifle with night vision and second with Leupold 2-7x Firedot scope in PEPR mount and Burris Fastfire III next to headboard. 6.8 on bathroom side of bed. If had to hide behind bed and 17 mag loads of 5.56 didn't get zombies to leave don't think having all the neckbeard inventory stuffed would be of any real help. Also a CETME living under the bed like a troll with a bag of mags in case poodle shooters don't crack open zombie heads.

Watch Ryder
February 25, 2017, 14:01
I always leave my mags fully loaded. Only ones I have ever had a problem with was the expensive Steel H&K mags. After only being loaded 6 months for me, they got weak and started jamming and loosing rounds out of them.

They were sold SOON after that. NEXT DAY!

I've got those type too but no problems with mine.

TerryN
February 26, 2017, 23:55
This, is impossible.

Right up until you have to move. AMHIK.

Navy BT1
March 03, 2017, 05:39
Just my 2 cents worth. Been around a long time. I load 5 for 7 in my Colt, 13 for 15 in my Glock, 18 for 20 or 28 for 30 in my AR/FAL/M1 Carbine.

Never had any issues with any GOOD QUALITY magazine that I own.

ftierson
March 03, 2017, 11:27
Right up until you have to move. AMHIK.

Ain't that the truth... :)

Forrest