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W.E.G.
January 27, 2017, 18:33
Gotta wait for it to dry, then trim

http://i64.tinypic.com/117h3wn.jpg

ArtBanks
January 27, 2017, 18:51
Nice start. Running a batch of .308 through the annealing machine.

http://i1180.photobucket.com/albums/x413/nf1e/IMG_0343_zpskz97qojx.jpg (http://s1180.photobucket.com/user/nf1e/media/IMG_0343_zpskz97qojx.jpg.html)

Semper Fi
Art

kmurphy
January 27, 2017, 20:10
Cool Krags

Hollis Wood
January 29, 2017, 14:34
Just sized a whole bunch of that myself.

I get some that won't slide into the case gauge, mostly due to burs on the rim.
I put those aside for the bolt rifle, though it probably doesn't matter that much for the M1.

meltblown
January 29, 2017, 15:28
That's some long 308 brass fer sure;)

W.E.G.
January 29, 2017, 17:56
Dinosuar eggs

michael_g927
January 30, 2017, 07:46
Why are they wet?

ArtBanks
January 30, 2017, 08:06
Why are they wet?

Just a guess, but a lot of us wet tumble with ss media. Especially older tarnished 06 casings.

jhend170
February 01, 2017, 12:13
Or used an ultrasonic cleaner like I do. I don't need my brass to be presentation shiny, just clean, and the US does that nicely.


Art, what brand/model of annealing machine do you use? Had a guy that did them for me but the moron was dealing in other stuff on the side, unbeknownst to me, and got his dumb ass thrown in jail. Guess I need to invest now.

W.E.G.
February 01, 2017, 12:23
I've never annealed a cartridge case in my life.

No plans to ever do so.

I shoot brass in a semi-auto three times, then I buy new brass.

I know you can push some lots of brass much farther. But, I've seen brass fail (separate) many times after three firings. That's as much as I need to know. I'm not gonna "probe" each case to make sure it won't be the one that fugks me during a Regional match when its 108-degree heat index.

Its already enough work to give each case a fair visual inspection, and do all the assorted prep-work.

Annealing is for benchrest shooters, and shooters who shoot oddball calibers.

I have my 30-06 brass squared away now through at least the mid-term elections, if not the next POTUS. Pretty sure I'm on at least that level of footing for .308. Harder to say about 5.56, because I tend to burn through that stuff once I work up some momentum. At least I'm good through this time next year with loaded 5.56. Got enough 5.56 brass to last the rest of my life. Which is comforting, but sort of sad too. Its like getting excited to go to the concert, and realizing that the band at the show sounds little like the band on the album.

Oh well...

machinegunner
February 01, 2017, 12:37
finished resizing and lubing aprox. 1500. rds ready for primers!

ArtBanks
February 01, 2017, 12:50
Or used an ultrasonic cleaner like I do. I don't need my brass to be presentation shiny, just clean, and the US does that nicely.


Art, what brand/model of annealing machine do you use? Had a guy that did them for me but the moron was dealing in other stuff on the side, unbeknownst to me, and got his dumb ass thrown in jail. Guess I need to invest now.

The annealing machine in my photo is made by Giraud just like my trimmer.

ArtBanks
February 01, 2017, 12:53
I've never annealed a cartridge case in my life.

No plans to ever do so.

I shoot brass in a semi-auto three times, then I buy new brass.

I know you can push some lots of brass much farther. But, I've seen brass fail (separate) many times after three firings. That's as much as I need to know. I'm not gonna "probe" each case to make sure it won't be the one that fugks me during a Regional match when its 108-degree heat index.

Its already enough work to give each case a fair visual inspection, and do all the assorted prep-work.

Annealing is for benchrest shooters, and shooters who shoot oddball calibers.

I have my 30-06 brass squared away now through at least the mid-term elections, if not the next POTUS. Pretty sure I'm on at least that level of footing for .308. Harder to say about 5.56, because I tend to burn through that stuff once I work up some momentum. At least I'm good through this time next year with loaded 5.56. Got enough 5.56 brass to last the rest of my life. Which is comforting, but sort of sad too. Its like getting excited to go to the concert, and realizing that the band at the show sounds little like the band on the album.

Oh well...

I have been annealing my brass for many years. I do not do it to extend the life of the cases, but to provide more consistent neck tension. I started doing it for BR and precision rifles and just decided that it was so simple an operation that I extended it to all my brass which adds up to over 10k per year if I am busy.

W.E.G.
February 01, 2017, 14:51
The neck tension thing is definitely a thing in benchrest.

Especially where bullets are just barely perched on the end of the neck in the first place.

As for common calibers in common guns for common use.
Well,... if you got the time for it I suppose. I don't shoot well enough to justify it. That much, I'm sure of.

TenTea
February 01, 2017, 14:52
FYI:
If anyone has got caught short by the drought in Krag brass the last few years, some became available within the last couple weeks.

Not cheap, but if a guy needs it...

*Used* Krag brass has been going for over $1 per piece on Gunbroker in recent months.

303 British can be sized up in Krag dies but the OAL of the Brit brass is then .100" shorter, which is not so good with long Krag throats, but can work in a pinch assuming a guy has 303 brass.

https://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/product/productId/73152

ArtBanks
February 01, 2017, 15:01
The neck tension thing is definitely a thing in benchrest.

Especially where bullets are just barely perched on the end of the neck in the first place.

As for common calibers in common guns for common use.
Well,... if you got the time for it I suppose. I don't shoot well enough to justify it. That much, I'm sure of.

I makes a difference when shooting lighter bullets in .308 precision tuned M-14s. I hate to used the word precision in the same sentence as M-14, but I have been able to stay on top of a competition for the last 3 years and I credit annealing as being a help.

jhend170
February 01, 2017, 15:39
As a scientist by trade I kind of have to believe in that physics thing. Work hardens and brittles brass. Annealing "resets" that issue and extends the life of the metal. It's not some "might work" kind of thing, it's a "does work" thing when you're moving shoulders a lot.

I try to get it done to all my once-fired auto-gun stuff. I'm getting twice the reloads per piece, typically about 8+ from 5.56, but I'm not loading very hot. What's nice these days though is that with the 5.56 now when I see neck issues it get's cut and repurposed to a life as 300BO. With not much neck it can often go another 3 or 4 times.

I don't shoot competition but I get really good accuracy as it is, and don't have to worry much about neck splits. I'm just getting into reloading the .308 caliber and expect to treat that brass similarly. Yeah, late to the party, but only to .308. Got a LOT of calibers that just came first.