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View Full Version : somebody wants a musket


W.E.G.
January 07, 2017, 22:14
my auction

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/612138656

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/gunbroker/Colt%20Sporter/DSCN4041_zpsugacowhi.jpg

SPEEDGUNNER
January 07, 2017, 22:48
You know, it is funny you referred to that old AR as a "musket" it reminded me of my son referring to having to carry a "musket" while in Ranger School at Ft Benning. I guess compared to the M4 it feels like an antique!!

hkshooter
January 07, 2017, 23:05
How come you don't offer this stuff up for sale here, Gary?

fmj_shooter
January 07, 2017, 23:28
How come you don't offer this stuff up for sale here, Gary?

This^

W.E.G.
January 08, 2017, 10:10
cause y'all don't want it bad enough

Mark IV
January 09, 2017, 09:11
Slab side lower with a post-ban upper/barrel? You don't have the original upper/barrel laying about, do you?

W.E.G.
January 09, 2017, 09:17
IIRC, I gave the barrel away 20 years ago.

The upper receiver is the "original" that came with that gun new.

hueyville
January 09, 2017, 11:50
I like this a lot.

The barrel cleaning has beendone gently and sparingly

Don't know how many rifles have seen ruined due to improper or overcleaning. Meet so many "old timers" or their kids who had to clean their rifle three times a day in boot camp and carry that through life. Know lots of people that clean a rifle everytime it's fired even if a single shot at a varmint. Know one particular guy who pulls down his entire vault several times per year and cleans every gun for no reason other than "your supposed to clean them regularly". All get cleaned after firing and some have been cleaned a dozen or more times since last time actually used for more than something to scrub.

Bought a Ruger 10/22 to build on and decided to do an experiment before the build. Took out of box, loaded and 7,000 rounds later it was still running fine with no cleaning. Kept it lubed with Lucas Synthetic Gun Oil and kept feeding it. Below is a photo that will notice the rifle along with pile of mix ammo next to a Las Vegas Casino change cup. That cup sits next to cloths washing machine and whenever find rimfire in pockets or bottom of washing machine it goes in the cup. Mix of shorts, long, long rifle, picked up off ground at range.

http://i62.tinypic.com/33k5d06.jpg

Cup happened to be full when hit the 7,000 round mark and really wanted to build the rifle. Ran the entire cup through, functioned fine then pulled barrel and sent to smith for inspection then cut, thread and recon for a suppressor rifle. Smith said he cleaned and bore was perfect. My rifle smith says seen more of his nice builds ruined by owners misc leaning than not cleaning. Glad to see there are others that understand if it works and groups, probably don't need to mess with it. (Dremel tool exception for W.E.G.)

W.E.G.
January 09, 2017, 13:31
I clean every 200-400 rounds, depending on how many rounds I plan to put through it at the next session.

Cleaning consists of three strokes with a dry brush (both directions) to loosen chunky stuff.

Spritz of compressed air (expels chunky stuff).

Hose the bore with big gurgle of Break Free.

Three cotton patches via a pull through.

Swab the chamber with paper towel wrapped around chamber brush.

Done.

High Master scores.
Except offhand. I suck at offhand. Always have. I'll get good at it one day.

phillyray
January 09, 2017, 20:12
Man, I wish all gun broker sellers listed items like you. Great description, great pics, excellent interactions for entire transaction. Well done!

fmj_shooter
January 09, 2017, 20:55
cause y'all don't want it bad enough

I thought it was because I'm notoriously cheap....

SWOHFAL
January 09, 2017, 21:20
I thought it was because I'm notoriously cheap....

Same thing.

hueyville
January 10, 2017, 10:10
Cleaning a nasty gun for me (usually 500 or more rounds) consists of opening flammable locker, grabbing can of carburetor or brake cleaner (cause I am cheap and buy brake cleaner by case) hosing out action, chamber and bore. Push one patch dipped in Hoppes followed by a dry patch down bore using a one piece rod and brass jag. Lube liberally with Lucas Synthetic Gun Oil, cycle action several times and wipe down with soft cotton shop rag. Load it, run a magazine which causes gun to sling oil like a 1970's AMF built Harley Davidson due to over oiling. Follow that up by wiping inside and out again with rag then let lie bleeding till stops seeping oil, wipe again and done.

Vault queens that are shot occasionally then returned to vault are cleaned well and put away. Can't count the number of times seen someone miss the barrel link hole with slide release or similar like not putting firing pin retaining pin in an AR bolt when reassembling. Seen so many little parts dropped, put in backwards, patch in bore and such my paranoia forces me to prove proper function then careful wipe down as final step. If ever in mood to buy a high mileage rifle would not hesitate to buy from you sir, not only the cleaning but barrel installed and headspace by W.O.A. means a lot. One of my finest rifles came from John's pile of test junk finished with and sent out to clean out his toolbox.

W.E.G.
January 10, 2017, 10:31
With all due respect Huey, I would at least spot-clean before it ever got to the needs-carburetor-cleaner point. Lubricate with some precision, adequate but not excessive. I've seen the "run it wet" guys with AR's at some training events. In fact, I seem to see all of them. They're the guys usually having all sorts of problems.

There might be some rare circumstances where the scorched-earth maintenance cycle is appropriate. Very rare for +99% of recreational shooters.

Some years ago, several of us did a foreign service weapon familiarization session for 200 USMC officers. We soon realized that the only way to keep the AK operating all day was to dunk it in a barrel of water after every few magazines. Not that it wouldn't run hot. Just that nobody could stand to hold onto it when touching any metal part caused immediate second-degree burns. So, it got a little lube squirt after coming out of the water. Which at least kept things moving.

Beltfed weapons seem to benefit most from a little more lube than your basic rifleman's duty rifle.

hueyville
January 10, 2017, 12:55
When start seeing failures to feed, fire or extract will amend my practices. Except for one of five new out of box SIG 1911's having two failures to feed fully during first 50 rounds, have not had a failure in over a year except when tuning gas on builds or playing with spring weights. I do clean my guns properly but only when actually need it. Was odd that one SIG acted up twice but now has over 1,000 rounds without an issue. Last week was 31 rounds shy of 500 on the week. Between Christmas and New Years had a 1,000+ round week. Know my guns personalities and treat each accordingly. Thus far it's working and nothing wears prematurely as have routine rebuilds based on round counts where slide to frame fit on pistols, timing on revolvers and throat erosion, bolt, carrier, etc is checked on rifles. Also know my powders and load using clean burning propellants.

W.E.G.
January 10, 2017, 13:06
I'm not saying the scorched-earth routine won't work.

I'm saying it's unnecessary.

If you clean your guns outdoors, you might not asphyxiate yourself, or give yourself cancer with that carburetor cleaner. But, you will strip every bit of existing lubrication off the gun. That stuff ain't great for a lot of plastics, paints, or wood finishes either.

Then, once you do have the gun drowned in Carburetor cleaner, you are forced to re-lubricate (and rust-protect) every part of of the gun. Drowning it another round in some sort of oil, probably accomplishes that. At the expense of the gun being a complete mess as already noted.

If that works for you, I'm not here to try to talk you out of it. But, I can't endorse it as a rational approach to small arm maintenance for the vast majority of persons with a gun hobby.

TenTea
January 10, 2017, 13:26
This is where I find a good use for WD40 (blasphemy!) rather than brake cleaner.

Slather the upper, lower and bcg with it and blow chunks with 100 psi of compressed air and cover the garage wall with carbon juice spatter... ;)

For me, this is the starting point of a full cleaning when an AR is filthy.
WD40 is used for nothing else in the process.

ETA: nice musket and good luck selling

nyalaman
January 10, 2017, 13:37
That would sell for $2000 in a Ct shop. I just posted a link to your Auction in the Arfcom CT pre-ban sighting thread.

raubvogel
January 10, 2017, 13:49
When you wrote musket I pictured a muzzleloader AR. Which would be a great think to make to annoy people in certain states and groups.

hueyville
January 10, 2017, 21:32
I'm not saying the scorched-earth routine won't work.

I'm saying it's unnecessary.

If you clean your guns outdoors, you might not asphyxiate yourself, or give yourself cancer with that carburetor cleaner. But, you will strip every bit of existing lubrication off the gun. That stuff ain't great for a lot of plastics, paints, or wood finishes
(Trim)
If that works for you, I'm not here to try to talk you out of it. But, I can't endorse it as a rational approach to small arm maintenance for the vast majority of persons with a gun hobby.

This technique is mostly for hosing out stainless range pistols at work where pile up high round counts, want to blow and go on the range guns. Have significant ventilation system for sucking the smoke off the firing line then really big filtered exhaust fans at bullet traps to clear any vaporized lead and hold rather than spray the neighborhood. It evacuates the solvents quicly also and have respirators. Stainless handguns, $300 to $400 range hoe AR's or the shop SKS, carburator or whatever blaster in a can doesn't hurt them and the drench with oil then let a few rounds fling the excess out makes sure nothing is left dry.

Launched 100 rounds of 160 grain lead 7.6239 this afternoon and noticed it was time to bomb and lube the SKS, first time its been cleaned since Thanksgiving. Five minutes and was back on its rack drying while sending flying ash trays with a 1911 while most would just be getting started cleaning the rifle. The shop SKS has seen over 10,000 cast lead boolits and shoots just as good today as when new. My W.O.A. AR 10 in 6XC, pre 64 Winchesters, bench rest rifles and the like get much more traditional and careful treatment.

Friend walked in earlier today and was appalled to see me welding suppressor mounts on two 14.7" 6.8 spc II AR's. Hate drilling and pinning then welding over pin, four equidistant tack welds then a quick spray with some flat black engine paint and fifteen minutes later twisted on the new can and was blazing with some 90 grain Gold Dots. $129 Palmetto clearance barrels on $20 blem lowers and $40 blem uppers, why get all freaky about? Have four of them and don't think my cleaning routine will kill them. Not your competitive service rifle type builds though suprisingly accurate for what is invested.

Ran a magazine of 6.8 Hornady 110 grain V-Max first time today and friend was stunned at how loud bullet slapped the big log out in the yard. Gun was pretty quiet with new can but bullet strikes were freaking loud. Promise will not half @$$ cleaning the new cans. Too much effort to have fixed if screw them up. Cool thing is the AAC claim no modifications necessary to rifles for multicaliber can is spot on thus far. Used same 7.62-SDN-6 on a 5.56, 6.8, 7.6240 AR plus my 16" FAL and a M1a and all ran without any adjustments. Yes more efficient and quiet cans but click and go on any 308 or smaller is convenient.

#1bambam
January 18, 2017, 22:59
Man.You guys comparing cleaning rituals makes me want to open my safe and apologize to my poor guns.

meltblown
January 18, 2017, 23:09
I'm not saying the scorched-earth routine won't work.

I'm saying it's unnecessary.

If you clean your guns outdoors, you might not asphyxiate yourself, or give yourself cancer with that carburetor cleaner. But, you will strip every bit of existing lubrication off the gun. That stuff ain't great for a lot of plastics, paints, or wood finishes either.

Then, once you do have the gun drowned in Carburetor cleaner, you are forced to re-lubricate (and rust-protect) every part of of the gun. Drowning it another round in some sort of oil, probably accomplishes that. At the expense of the gun being a complete mess as already noted.

If that works for you, I'm not here to try to talk you out of it. But, I can't endorse it as a rational approach to small arm maintenance for the vast majority of persons with a gun hobby.

Carb cleaner only before applying paint. I clean mine when when they are disgustingly dirty. The suppressors make this happen rather quickly. I hate getting the goo under my fingernails.

W.E.G.
January 18, 2017, 23:17
Yes, suppressors foul a weapon at rate about 10x the rate of an unsuppressed weapon.

I keep forgetting to mention that when I go on my I-hate-suppressors rant. I get so caught up in the gas-in-the-face, and baffle-strike, issues I completely forget to serve that one up.

Texgunner
January 19, 2017, 09:49
Man.You guys comparing cleaning rituals makes me want to open my safe and apologize to my poor guns.

^^^ What he said...:sad:

BiGB808
January 24, 2017, 14:57
"I forget to serve that one up"..hahah

aussiedave
February 07, 2017, 00:23
cause y'all don't want it bad enough

one of the nicest way to say " Y'all are cheap bastards"