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michael_g927
December 10, 2016, 16:54
I been reading some good reviews on these. They even have a review featuring this rifle in the latest Dillon cataloge.
Any of you good folks have one of these?

.30-06
December 11, 2016, 10:43
A buddy of mine bought one I shot a few times. seems like a solid rifle. I'd like to buy one soon.

Cornpone
December 11, 2016, 11:11
You'd be better off saving a little more money and buying a PTR-91 GI. The PTR is a better rifle with all new parts and if you happen to have a problem PTR's customer service is first rate. The c308 is a mix of new and used parts and century's CS is horrible. You'll find I'm not the only one who will steer you towards the PTR.

Gunslinger_Rex
December 11, 2016, 17:08
I been reading some good reviews on these. They even have a review featuring this rifle in the latest Dillon cataloge.
Any of you good folks have one of these?


I decided to take advantage of post election pricing and see if I could be one of the lucky ones who got a functional, cheap .308 battle rifle for the collection.

Out of the box, my rifle looked good. Fit and finish were very good overall for a rifle built from a combination of new and surplus parts. The only exception was the chevron muzzle brake installed on the weapon. It is too small in diameter, with an ugly greenish parkerizing that does not match the rest of the rifle. Thankfully, that is not pinned or welded, and was easy to replace.

I performed a quick function check. The charging handle operated as smoothly as is possible for a CETME/G3 rifle. Safety operation was smooth and easy. The detent positions aren't very positive, but adequate. The trigger was typical for the type, kind of a start and stop take up, and a slightly gritty final stage that broke around 8-9 lbs.

All in all, a pretty positive impression. Unfortunately, the rifle as it left the factory is unsafe to fire. With the rifle in battery, bolt locked, hammer down on an empty chamber, there should be a small gap between the bolt carrier and the rear of the bolt. This gap should ideally be between .010-.020". Used rifles with a bit of wear can get down as low as .004" can still function fine, but below that typical autoloader malfunctions start to crop up. Above .020", things can get dangerous. Firing out of battery begins to become a possibility. Out of the box, my rifle's bolt gap was sloppy loose on an .025", but wouldn't quite take an .028" gauge. Luckily, the standard 8mm rollers were installed on my rifle, which means some -6 rollers corrected the problem. Now my bolt gap is .017". I still need to get it to the range to test fire it, though.

hueyville
December 12, 2016, 15:16
Had an opportunity to buy a super deal in a Century CETME recently and was almost the proud owner but decided to run to shop and grab a set of feeler gauges and three machinists levels. First up the bolt gap was 0.28" snug but not tight. Put rifle in the LGS rifle vice and got it as level as possible. Put second level on rear sight and was enough out of square that it was bound to have issues getting zeroed. Fit between upper and lower receiver looked like done with tin snips, gobs of weld, Bondo and lots of spray paint to try and make silk out of a sows ear. This was a new out of the box rifle on LGS shelf. When showed them the bolt gap issue they took that as reason to return to Century for repair or credit, not sure which.

Before that they had a C93 done up in 5.56 NATO which I can't really comprehend what would use it for. Don't think I will pull another off the shelf anytime soon. Who am I fooling, will keep looking at every CETME or clone that passes by hoping to find another good one or three to add to the pile. Someday battle rifles may get rare and have two good ones from Century that lucked up on used (look for wood furniture seems to be first clue) including one of the "limited edition" 2004 models that seems to be no different than the others except say Limited Edition and different rear sight along with an oddball thread pattern on the muzzle brake/loudener.

michael_g927
December 12, 2016, 17:04
Thanks for the first hand review.

weasel _master
January 06, 2017, 21:00
If you can work on them, I wouldn't steer clear of a c308. If you can pick it up quite a bit cheaper than a ptr and fix it's issues, you can end up money ahead. However you need to know what you're getting into. As said, ensure bolt gap between .004 and .020". Cocking lever should have a slight gap between it and the end of the front of the bolt carrier, not resting on it. Next ensure the gap isn't too big as the Cocking lever won't cam on the end of the bolt carrier and it will be tough to unlock the rollers. Measure the bolt head and ensure they didn't grind it to artificially raise the bolt gap. Check the sights to ensure they are straight and not canted. Insert several magazines and ensure they lock in correctly.

I checked mine out before I bought it and saved a fair amount off a PTR. Of course having the century name on it, you have a tougher time if you want to resell, but I typically hold onto my guns.

Dep
February 04, 2017, 03:36
There are many folks on the HKPRO Forum that are quite happy with their Century CETME rifles. There are plenty of gunsmiths on that forum that can fix things if there is a problem with them. I would have bought one if it wasn't for that welded-on sight rail. I prefer a more "original" look. So I got a PTR91 GI from Atlantic. Should arrive next week.

http://www.ptr91.com/uploaded_files/rifles/i_d098bad957a44a7db43f59bb306d46e8G.I..png

hkshooter
February 04, 2017, 09:19
For the money the C308 is a good deal if you get a good one. Generally, most knowledgeable folks will only consider a Century product if they can lay hands on it and look it over well. Bolt gap is a good example of something to check but in the case of Century it's not always valid. They've been known to grind the bolt heads to get the proper gap so disassembly is required to catch this.
If I could fully inspect the rifle myself I would buy one. If I wanted one. For $300-$400 more the PTR is a notably better rifle, as said above.

Dep
February 04, 2017, 15:33
And for the disbelievers who don't think a Century CETME can take it:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCBNPLBWeJ4&t=22s

fuel fire desire
February 04, 2017, 16:04
I bought one for $250 at Dunhams years ago back in the days of $50 mosins and $100 SKSs. It was just.....ok. I thought the trigger was vague, and it liked to stovepipe fairly often. But, for what I paid it was fun. Smooth and soft recoil for a .308. If $200 makes the difference between a cetme and a PTR, I would definitely go for the PTR. But if you could find a cetme on the cheap I'd go for it.

hkshooter
February 04, 2017, 17:54
I bought one for $250 at Dunhams years ago back in the days of $50 mosins and $100 SKSs.

No you didn't, the C308 was available or even a model back then. The Century rifles back. Them were built on Hesse receivers with surplus G3 parts. Today's C308 is a different gun built with CETME parts.

Dep
February 05, 2017, 19:44
I had a CETME from Century back then. Mark Powell got it for me. Not sure what receiver it was built on, but it had all CETME parts with wood furniture. It was a beautiful rife and functioned 100%. They are on Gunbroker for around $900.

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/619149382

Mine wasn't marked one of 500. But looked exactly like the one in the ad. I'd love to get another one of those. :)

hkshooter
February 05, 2017, 19:54
I had a CETME from Century back then. Mark Powell got it for me. Not sure what receiver it was built on, but it had all CETME parts with wood furniture. It was a beautiful rife and functioned 100%. They are on Gunbroker for around $900.

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/619149382

Mine wasn't marked one of 500. But looked exactly like the one in the ad. I'd love to get another one of those. :)

That rifle is built on the cast stainless steel receiver and is considered one of the best CETME rifles century made. Want one myself.

Dep
February 05, 2017, 21:10
That rifle is built on the cast stainless steel receiver and is considered one of the best CETME rifles century made. Want one myself.

Could be. I had a green furniture H&K limited production clone from Century that was built on a cast stainless receiver too. But it had a much rougher texture to it. The CETME was smooth as silk. I am still kicking myself for getting rid of them. :(

Johnaski
September 08, 2017, 20:58
I think you guys have the Century Cetme and the newer C308 confused. PTR supplies the barrel, receiver and hk surplus stock/hand guard for the C308. The internals are the last of the surplus Cetme parts they found.

Pretty sure they have not been shaving the bolt faces on the C308's.