PDA

View Full Version : S&W revolvers are addictive!


AZ Dave
October 30, 2016, 10:07
I've bought 4 357's in the last 5 months. An L-Comp 586 a 27 a 28 and a 686. I fear these wont be the last:facepalm::omgonoz:

VALMET
October 30, 2016, 10:52
Congrats! Of all of the firearms that have a tendency to multiply in a safe, vintage S&Ws are some of the worst offenders.

SPEEDGUNNER
October 30, 2016, 13:22
Uh, yeah...

yellowhand
October 30, 2016, 18:55
Same problem, just picked up a mint SW Model 15 with factory target stocks.:biggrin:

Bawana jim
October 31, 2016, 01:16
Got my eye on an old 44 special, get to try before I buy this week :bow:

Right Side Up
October 31, 2016, 01:45
Vintage N Frame's are a weakness of mine.

Bawana jim
October 31, 2016, 02:03
Vintage N Frame's are a weakness of mine.

Found a nice old shooter, guy is letting me try it out. Nickle but peeling some and it looks like an early 1917. Not much collector value but since I bought a Colt 44 special I figured this old Nickle gun would fit right in. Have to try it first...:wink:

Right Side Up
October 31, 2016, 02:05
Cool. Hope it works out.

Bawana jim
October 31, 2016, 02:18
Love the fit and finish of old smiths, even when they have had years of use they still run good.

Retired Bum
October 31, 2016, 06:53
Just before I retired from the BOP a fellow C.O. told me that he had a .38 Special revolver he was looking to sell. Since the .38 Special is my favorite revolver caliber I asked him to show me what he had.

It was a pre-war .38/44 Outdoorsman made in 1937. Had the standard 6.5 inch barrel, the small adjustable rear sight, and factory grips numbered to the gun. About 80 percent condition finish wise. Perfect bore and chambers and a DA trigger pull that was oiled glass smooth. So after examining the Outdoorsman I asked what he wanted for it. $250 was the answer. So I handed over five Grant's and it was mine.

So I currently own one .38 Special, three .357 Magnums, two .41 Magnums, two .44 Specials, one .44-40 WCF, two .44 Magnums, one .45 Colt, three .45 ACP's, and one .455 Hand Ejector N frames. And there is always room in the safe for one more.....

And so it goes.


The Retired One

TenTea
October 31, 2016, 08:31
S&W revolvers are addictive!

Never had it and I don't want it again!

:D

19&41
October 31, 2016, 20:10
S&W revolvers are fine machinery. My 64 and 65 each function like the doors on an old Lincoln Continental.

BUFF
November 01, 2016, 00:01
If it has a shrouded ejector rod below the barrel, it's probably a .44 H.E. Third Model, or 1926 for short. No shroud, it's a .44 H.E. Second Model. They ran in the same serial number range.

Assuming, that it isn't a Triple Lock, the .44 H.E. First Model. That will have a little rectangular piece sticking out of the front of said ejector rod shroud and a locking part on the rear of said shroud.

.44 Special S&W's made after WWII will have an S or an N as the beginning of the serial number on the bottom of the grip frame. Pre-war won't.

If you an get a photo, we can figure out just what it is, from 'that's a great gun' to 'THAT'S A GREAT GUN!'

I like the .44 Special a lot.

AZ Dave
November 01, 2016, 06:49
Buff, I noticed you didn't mention your issues with S&W's. The first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem...Just saying... :bow:

Bawana jim
November 01, 2016, 08:30
It's just a shooter, HE in the 74,000 range. Nickle over Nickle and lots of flaking. Excellent bore and good lock up. Wrong grips and front sight has brass bead. I wanted a shooter, no sense ruining the value of a collector.

justashooter
November 01, 2016, 13:17
just picked up a 1959 serial number date pre-17 target masterpiece. single action is a breath of air. nicest K frame of many in "le chateau scotty".

BUFF
November 01, 2016, 14:37
Buff, I noticed you didn't mention your issues with S&W's. The first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem...Just saying... :bow:

Yes, Dave, I have a problem. I'm BUFF, and I'm a Smith & Wessonaholic.

Last count was 16 S&W's in .44 Special alone, from a 5" Triple Lock from 1912 to a Model 24-5 Heritage Series with the frame color casehardened by Doug Turnbull from 2002. Favorite may be an original 5 inch 1950 Target shipped in my birth year, 1952, to Salt Lake Hardware Co., about 2miles from the hospital I was born in. Found it for sale in Kansas.

Trying to explain why the .44 Special is so great is like trying to explain why classical jazz is so great, you either get it naturally with a little exposure or you don't. I don't care for jazz much, though.

BUFF
November 01, 2016, 15:02
"It's just a shooter, HE in the 74,000 range."

Hmmm. My books don't show any .44 HE with a number that high, they show getting up to about 62,350 before 1942. After the war, they picked up at the same number range but added an S prefix. There's often some space between the S on the butt and the digits.

Might also have been converted to .44 Special from something else, 1917's went to 209,791 by 1946 and .455 H.E.'s made for the Brits and Canucks got up to 74,775 by 1917.

Ejector rod shroud or no shroud?

Sounds like a pretty interesting sixgun. They usually all shoot very well. I wouldn't load it very hot. For my pre-WWII guns, I like to duplicate the traditional factory load of about 700-750 fps but with a cast 250 grain SWC instead of round nose. You can get that with 4.1 grains of Bullseye, 5.5 Unique or 5.4 W-231. Traditional factory round from W-W and R-P with the 246 round nose are supposed to go about 750 fps but have always chronographed closer to 700 fps in my guns.

Bawana jim
November 01, 2016, 18:18
"It's just a shooter, HE in the 74,000 range."

Hmmm. My books don't show any .44 HE with a number that high, they show getting up to about 62,350 before 1942. After the war, they picked up at the same number range but added an S prefix. There's often some space between the S on the butt and the digits.

Might also have been converted to .44 Special from something else, 1917's went to 209,791 by 1946 and .455 H.E.'s made for the Brits and Canucks got up to 74,775 by 1917.

Ejector rod shroud or no shroud?

Sounds like a pretty interesting sixgun. They usually all shoot very well. I wouldn't load it very hot. For my pre-WWII guns, I like to duplicate the traditional factory load of about 700-750 fps but with a cast 250 grain SWC instead of round nose. You can get that with 4.1 grains of Bullseye, 5.5 Unique or 5.4 W-231. Traditional factory round from W-W and R-P with the 246 round nose are supposed to go about 750 fps but have always chronographed closer to 700 fps in my guns.

Old eyes playing tricks on me, the 74,000 was on the crane and the crane area. On the butt was 24,000 number. No shroud. When they Nickled it the buffed off the cylinder edges but all the lettering was saved. Was going through some grips to put on it and not much fits but N Frame's are close. It does look a great deal like an old 1917 but it looks like fun more than anything.

AZ Dave
November 01, 2016, 19:34
Buff, I'd love to see a picture of that 24-5 with the case hardened frame.

BUFF
November 01, 2016, 21:04
Dave, I'm probably the last man on earth without a digital camera.

24,000 with no shroud would be a Second Model from about 1925. Lots of Second Models were assembled on leftover 1917 frames, except for the barrel and cylinder they are the same gun. The number in yoke cut and on the yoke are assembly numbers to keep the main pieces together after they were fitted and were being blued or nickeled. Same number will be on the inside of the sideplate. The serial number will be on the bottom of the grip frame, the rear face of the cylinder, the little flat on the bottom of the barrel and a couple other non-obvious places.

Any square butt N frame grips should fit. There was a short period when the grips and frame were a little longer on the bottom, but I don't think yours would be one.

K. Funk
November 01, 2016, 21:07
I just picked up another Pre-20 Heavy Duty with an "S" pre-fix and a 6" barrel for cheap. It is just pure heaven. I could probably sell it for a 3X profit, but I think I'm going to keep this one for me!!

krf

catmguy445
November 02, 2016, 23:55
I know what you mean about addictive. And I'm not even a wheelgun guy. That said, to date I have a 4" blue 586, 4" 686, 4" blue Mdl. 15, 2" Mdl. 649 .38 Spl., 3" Mdl. 36 .38 Spl. with casehardened frame and Hogue wood grips plus a Wolff spring kit and DIY action job, 3" Mdl. 24-3 Lew Horton .44 Spl. blue, 3 Mdl. 25-5's in .45 Colt; 1 hard chrome 4" with John French action job, 1 4" nickel with Combat trigger and Pachmayr grips, and 1 6" blue. I just got the Mdl. 36 a couple of months ago, so the addiction doesn't ever go away.

yellowhand
November 03, 2016, 00:00
I know what you mean about addictive. And I'm not even a wheelgun guy. That said, to date I have a 4" blue 586, 4" 686, 4" blue Mdl. 15, 2" Mdl. 649 .38 Spl., 3" Mdl. 36 .38 Spl. with casehardened frame and Hogue wood grips plus a Wolff spring kit and DIY action job, 3" Mdl. 24-3 Lew Horton .44 Spl. blue, 3 Mdl. 25-5's in .45 Colt; 1 hard chrome 4" with John French action job, 1 4" nickel with Combat trigger and Pachmayr grips, and 1 6" blue. I just got the Mdl. 36 a couple of months ago, so the addiction doesn't ever go away.

Add a Model 19 or two, very nice collection!:bow:
Wife loves shooting my long barrel 25-5.

Right Side Up
November 03, 2016, 00:45
I had a 4" Model 25 years ago that I regret selling.

I have my eye on a very nice Model 57 in nickel finish.

yellowhand
November 03, 2016, 10:06
With all this SW love, will take photos of a yard sale find I picked up recently.
Parkerized, 38 SW caliber, wood stocks, odd looking thing.
Guy I got it from, said he got it right after WWII surplus sale for 11 bucks.
I gave him a hundred for it and promised not to sell it.
Shoots good, even with weak ass round.
Need to look it up and see what I have.:facepalm:

Bawana jim
November 03, 2016, 10:40
With all this SW love, will take photos of a yard sale find I picked up recently.
Parkerized, 38 SW caliber, wood stocks, odd looking thing.
Guy I got it from, said he got it right after WWII surplus sale for 11 bucks.
I gave him a hundred for it and promised not to sell it.
Shoots good, even with weak ass round.
Need to look it up and see what I have.:facepalm:

Sounds like a victory model.....

yellowhand
November 03, 2016, 13:12
Sounds like a victory model.....

I think so as well.
Will pull it out of the safe.
2nd new bathroom going in today, so contractors are here.:facepalm:

Bawana jim
November 03, 2016, 13:16
I think so as well.
Will pull it out of the safe.
2nd new bathroom going in today, so contractors are here.:facepalm:

http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/category/categoryId/517?


:biggrin:

Retired Bum
November 03, 2016, 15:25
After being evacuated from the beaches of Dunkirk the British were seriously short of small arms.

British purchasing agents came to the US and started buying up available firearms and handing out what were called "open ended" contracts for firearms and ammunition.

S&W was given a contract to produce the .38/200 Hand Ejector. This was the K frame M&P chambered for the old .38 S&W cartridge. The revolvers made for the British had five inch barrels, a lanyard ring on the butt, plain smooth walnut grips, and what S&W called the "Black Magic" finish which was their name for the phosphate aka parkerized finish. With the Japanese Surrender in September 1945 the contract was cancelled. S&W had produced a bit over 750,000 Victory Models for the British.

If you are thinking about purchasing one of these British contract Victories be aware that a British firm after the war name of Cogswell & Harrison reamed out the chambers so they would accept the longer .38 Special cartridge. A .38 Special fired in one of these converted Victories will result in a bulged case and possibly a case split. Also the .38/200 Victories have a .360 inch groove diameter. The smaller .357/.358 inch Special bullets will have accuracy problems. The one exception is the 148 grain HBWC round. This bullet will "slug up" to fill the bigger groove diameter.

As I recall Lee Harvey Oswald owned one of these converted .38/200 Victories and used it to shoot and kill a Dallas police officer the same day he was accused of shooting JFK. I wonder where it is now?

And so it goes.


The Retired One

yellowhand
November 03, 2016, 16:28
" The revolvers made for the British had five inch barrels, a lanyard ring on the butt, plain smooth walnut grips, and what S&W called the "Black Magic" finish which was their name for the phosphate aka parkerized finish."""


That what it is then, exactly as noted above.

K. Funk
November 03, 2016, 17:35
OK..here it is. After checking it out I am pretty sure it is 1946 .38/44 Heavy Duty Postwar Transitional with the 6-1/2" barrel. S/N is S62564 with a star. Not bad for $220.

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c272/kandainv/003_zpsvfky5sks.jpg (http://s29.photobucket.com/user/kandainv/media/003_zpsvfky5sks.jpg.html)

krf

BUFF
November 03, 2016, 20:43
Yep, early in the post-war start-up. The star indicates it was returned to the factory for some kind of repair. Killer deal.

tdb59
November 03, 2016, 21:13
Old eyes playing tricks on me, the 74,000 was on the crane and the crane area. On the butt was 24,000 number. No shroud. When they Nickled it the buffed off the cylinder edges but all the lettering was saved. Was going through some grips to put on it and not much fits but N Frame's are close. It does look a great deal like an old 1917 but it looks like fun more than anything.

Did it have plastic faux pearl grips, a copper topped front sight , and missing the lanyard ring ??


;)


....................

Bawana jim
November 03, 2016, 21:48
Did it have plastic faux pearl grips, a copper topped front sight , and missing the lanyard ring ??


;)


....................

Yep, same one, I haven't shot it yet or bought it.:D

nvcdl
November 04, 2016, 16:15
I picked up a Performance Center 686-5 Hunter last weekend - hard to resist the call. Lately I've been sucked into the vortex of 3rd Generation S&W autos but this is the wrong forums for that...