PDA

View Full Version : Beater model 12 value.


richbug
August 25, 2016, 10:25
Thoughts on what a beater grade Winchester model 12 might be?

Was a full choke, take down, solid rib gun from 1926 plus or minus a year(402,000).

Now 20", set up for colonial thin walls.

Not much original finish, cycles fine, crack at wrist that needs attention, someones SSN engraved in side of receiver.

Trying to decide whether to sell, or to parkerize it, fix the stock, and stash in my truck.

VALMET
August 25, 2016, 10:59
Can't be more than a few hundred $ I wouldn't think. Sounds like a great candidate for a truck gun to me.

tdb59
August 25, 2016, 11:42
... parkerize it, fix the stock, and stash in my truck.

Do this.




.....

broderick
August 25, 2016, 14:07
check for receiver cracks with magnaflux. found out my grandfather's shotgun had receiver cracks and probably best not to shoot it. He was a huge quail hunter and probably fired 15-20k rounds through it from 1922 thru 1970.

K. Funk
August 25, 2016, 15:55
Wow, was a nice gun at one time. Solid rib commands a premium. Not worth more than 175-200 now. It will make a good truck gun.

krf

bulletslap
August 25, 2016, 19:52
Whoever cut the solid rib barrels needs to have their butt whipped:sad:

I would repair and make a Truck Gun out of it.

juanni
August 25, 2016, 20:39
I got a similar condition mdl 12 for $125 without the rib and goose egged out at the muzzle.

Chopped it to 18", installed a brass bead, carefully worked epoxy deep into the stock crack, parked it and it is now my poser vintage/chic riot gun.




..............juanni

richbug
August 26, 2016, 09:23
Thanks all. What I figured and have into it. I guess it goes into the "to do" closet.

Shootability
August 26, 2016, 09:29
Had not heard of the solid rib - is it steel?

I assume it predates the AL vent rib?

I have always wanted a M12 - have been buying M37s for a few years and now they are going up in price - good guns made with skill.

Pluribus
August 26, 2016, 11:32
Had not heard of the solid rib - is it steel?

I assume it predates the AL vent rib?

I have always wanted a M12 - have been buying M37s for a few years and now they are going up in price - good guns made with skill.

Yes, steel. Simmons matted ribs were an extra $$. Hard to find now. A tornado killed mine in 1992 and it was made in 1915..

yovinny
August 28, 2016, 09:08
Model 12's are nice, sounds like it would make a fine truck gun.
Personally, for a truck gun, I would paint over park though.
Park itself hasent tended to hold up well for me in truck guns and if your W PA right off the lakes, I know your truck gets 'moist' inside...lol
I dont think my truck ever dried out the year I lived outside Warren PA.

Cheers, YV

Mebsuta
August 28, 2016, 23:14
I would fix the stock but not bother parkerizing or refinishing it. I would shoot it some and see what falls off or what needs attention.

justashooter
August 30, 2016, 16:57
1926 is old enuf that it might be chambered for 2 9/16 shells. 12, 16, and 20 gauge were available in this chamber length until 1928. short chambered guns will not want to let the front end of a fired plastic shotshell go out the gate.

my favourite shotgun is a 16 gauge model 12 on a 20 gauge frame with 26" factory full choke. 1927, had to enlarge the ejection port and ream the chamber.

bulletslap
August 30, 2016, 20:31
Only 16 gauge Model 12s were chambered for 2 9/16 shells.

The early 20 gauges ( the first model 12s) were chambered for 2 1/2 inch shells, the 12 Gauge model 12s were chambered for 2 3/4 shells from the beginning.

One thing to remember is to include the length of the chamber ring when measuring chamber length on a model 12.

And circa 1928 or 1926 was the approximate date 16 gauges began being built with 2 3/4 inch chambers.

justashooter
August 31, 2016, 11:52
[QUOTE=bulletslap;4288380]Only 16 gauge Model 12s were chambered for 2 9/16 shells.
QUOTE]

thanks for the correction.

bulletslap
August 31, 2016, 19:54
I hope I didn't come across as a smart ass - if I did it wasn't intended.

The length of shotgun shells and chambers varied quite a bit up until the 1930s.

I have a pre WW I 20 gauge pump that was built with a 3 inch chamber - for a contemporary shell that was loaded with less shot and to a lower pressure than the 3 inch 20 gauge we know today. And it built at the same time Winchester was building 2 1/2 20 gauge model 12s.