PDA

View Full Version : How often do you grease it?


Boomerdownsir
February 09, 2016, 20:32
Hey all, I realized I haven't taken apart my garand in over a year, should it be a yearly practice to do so and lube it up? What about the stock? I'm worried if I touch it someone will cry foul and say I've ruined it.

W.E.G.
February 09, 2016, 20:35
Get some CLP in the gas cylinder. That's always the first part to rust.

Boomerdownsir
February 09, 2016, 21:49
Get some CLP in the gas cylinder. That's always the first part to rust.

Wow, I never would have thought. I have a piston rifle I haven't shot it in some time but noticed the gas plug was snug as hell. Popped out the OP rod and sure enough rust and green corrosion, I guess from copper fouling? Man if the same happens to the garand I might cry. I'm afraid to look.

W.E.G.
February 09, 2016, 22:28
I first learned about gas system rust the hard way.

In 1988.

With a Mini-14.

I've been on it since then.

Orlando8
February 10, 2016, 06:18
I have owned, collected and built Garands for many, many years and have never seen a gas clyinder rust yet. They are stainless steel and made from stainless so to run dry with no lube. If you do lube go very sparingly as if you use to much it can cuase short stroking. I have seen this happen from guys that didnt know any better
As far as lubing your rifle it depends on how much you shoot it. If it looks like it needs it add some grease during the year. I do a complete detailed tear down, clean lube once a year and just add grease as neede otherwise

garandguy10
February 10, 2016, 10:01
Chicom M14 gas cylinders are steel, not stainless steel and can rust.

Chicom M14 gas pistons are chrome plated steel and can also rust.

USGI M1 Garand and M14 gas cylinders and pistons are stainless steel and do not rust or corrode very easily, however they can become fouled with gunk if the are not cleaned and may corrode if really abused.

MAINER
February 10, 2016, 12:31
http://www.garandgear.com/m1-garand-inspection
http://www.garandgear.com/m1-garand-strip
http://www.garandgear.com/cleaning-m1-garand-parts
http://www.garandgear.com/m1-garand-grease

For the stock, there used to be a decent procedure from the CMP, but the files is no longer found or the site is in maintenance.
http://www.odcmp.com/Services/Rifles...ng_article.htm

To maintain the stock, a thin coat rubbed in, of whatever finish was originally used for a finish can be applied. In most cases this would be BLO or Tung oil.
I use BLO, hand rubbed in, about once or twice a year and both stock and oil are warmed a bit before applying.

There is an old formula of 1/3rd BLO, 1/3rd Pure Beeswax, and 1/3rd Turpentine, that the old time Military rifle shooters used to keep their rifles spiffy.
Don't make a bunch of this stuff if you try it as a Shoe Shine sized tin of it will last a decade or so.

Texgunner
February 10, 2016, 17:01
There is an old formula of 1/3rd BLO, 1/3rd Pure Beeswax, and 1/3rd Turpentine, that the old time Military rifle shooters used to keep their rifles spiffy.
Don't make a bunch of this stuff if you try it as a Shoe Shine sized tin of it will last a decade or so.

This is the stuff I mostly use on rifle stocks (exception is shellacked K-31s) It's easy to make and looks great when rubbed into the wood. It smells good too!

.30-06
February 11, 2016, 14:38
I never really lube up my Garand. Runs fine.

Democrat1
February 14, 2016, 15:39
At least lube the tab on the Op Rod which keeps it from dismounting. When it wears enough, it will dismount. This is bad when you don't want it.

Lube every other place where the park wears through. Don't put a lot on. Lube on the reciprocating parts tends to get slung everywhere, especially your eyes, so another reason to wear glasses.

My observation is that my Garands and M1As always shot better with grease on them.

Orlando8
February 14, 2016, 16:38
Yes the op rod tab as well as the area that the bolt lug rides in, the receiver rails, top of hammer, bottom of barrel that the saddle hits, channel in stock ferrule, both tabs on bolt, the back top of bolt ring, hammer, trigger pins, back side of safety and triggerare the major areas.

Democrat1
February 21, 2016, 07:46
There are a lot of very old articles about old lube in the M1 getting oxidized and not doing its job properly. The original lube for the M1 was moly disulfide. If you are using one of the modern plastilubes, you may not need to wipe old oxidized lube off and relube on any sort of regular basis.

Just use a little. Keep it out of your bedding, where it will do bad things.

ArtBanks
February 21, 2016, 08:32
I remove carbon filled lube and re-grease my M1s,M1 carbines and M-14s every time I shoot. Q tips and my grease injector are an integral part of cleaning.

Orlando8
February 21, 2016, 08:41
You dont grease your car chassis everytime you drive it ?? Why would you grease yourn rifle every time you fire it?
You only need to reapply grease when its starts to wear thin or when doing a complete tear down/clean

ArtBanks
February 21, 2016, 08:48
You dont grease your car chassis everytime you drive it ?? Why would you grease yourn rifle every time you fire it?
You only need to reapply grease when its starts to wear thin or when doing a complete tear down/clean

Because every time I take a rifle out on my range it gets a couple of hundred rounds or more through it. Carbon loves to get caught in the lube and why not take it out and replace with clean grease. I guess it's probably a bad habit picked up in the Marine Corp 50 years ago when I was issued the M1 and later the M-14. I like to know that each weapon has been cleaned , inspected and is ready to go on a moments notice. An old Boy Scout thing, be prepared.

19&41
February 25, 2016, 11:20
I use this on all my rifles. It coats and prevents rust and stays greasy and it doesn't dry out. I haven't gotten any rust on weapons I have used it on. Some I have cleaned, put a coat of this on and put up for 10 years with no rust. It is an excellent wear preventative also.

http://www.harborfreight.com/85-gram-super-lube-grease-cartridge-93744.html

Mebsuta
February 27, 2016, 01:48
I would grease it for Miss Johnson, my old boss, any time. Teh HoTT! :love:

Super B
August 01, 2016, 03:05
So, basically, grease all the places the steel peeks through the park?

Orlando8
August 01, 2016, 16:38
Thats a start

sharkey
August 01, 2016, 19:20
An old favorite 'RIG' :
http://www.brownells.com/gun-cleaning-chemicals/oils-lubricants/rust-prevention/rig-universal-gun-grease-prod31842.aspx

ICOM7800
August 08, 2016, 18:44
Get some CLP in the gas cylinder. That's always the first part to rust.

Really???????????? Ive been collecting Garands for over 40 years.Gas cylinders are stainless. NO lube required.LOL

ICOM7800
August 08, 2016, 18:45
You dont grease your car chassis everytime you drive it ?? Why would you grease yourn rifle every time you fire it?
You only need to reapply grease when its starts to wear thin or when doing a complete tear down/clean

THIS

ICOM7800
August 08, 2016, 18:54
Wow, I never would have thought. I have a piston rifle I haven't shot it in some time but noticed the gas plug was snug as hell. Popped out the OP rod and sure enough rust and green corrosion, I guess from copper fouling? Man if the same happens to the garand I might cry. I'm afraid to look.

Clean your gas cylinder with MPRO7 to get all the carbon out.Do not use any lube in cylinder or on the piston on op rod.Use a good lithium grease on op rod end towards receiver.Shoot the hell out of it and have fun.

hueyville
August 08, 2016, 19:22
Seen guns ruined from never being cleaned, seen them ruined from being over cleaned. Run them till look like they need it. Pull the vaults down every few years to make sure rust has not reached something in the rear but if it doesn't show a need, leave well enough alone. Purchased a box stock 10-22 and decided to see how long it would run without cleaning. Two years and a few thousand rounds later got really tired of the factory trigger and barrel so cleaned it before rebuilding it. Fired lots of pocket lint covered, found in bottom of washing machine, picked up from ground at range, shorts, long and long rifle through it.

Have dozen or more guns sitting around dirty now. If it is used for defense/offense it is dirty. Most malfunctions have seen were due to improper reassembly after detailed cleaning. If you haven't ever missed something, send me a bottle of whatever your drinking. After clean my daily carries, lube and run a magazine through it to ensure all is good then wipe and drop in holster. Clean my bedside or truck rifles, shoot a few rounds before it goes into mission critical role. If it gets shot often, what the crap can happen? If it's going in the back of the vault for a decade, it gets cleaned, greased inside and out, top to bottom. The it must be cleaned if touched is a Pavlov's Dogs thing to program troops like public school kids move when the bell rings.

ICOM7800
August 08, 2016, 19:29
Seen guns ruined from never being cleaned, seen them ruined from being over cleaned. Run them till look like they need it. Pull the vaults down every few years to make sure rust has not reached something in the rear but if it doesn't show a need, leave well enough alone. Purchased a box stock 10-22 and decided to see how long it would run without cleaning. Two years and a few thousand rounds later got really tired of the factory trigger and barrel so cleaned it before rebuilding it. Fired lots of pocket lint covered, found in bottom of washing machine, picked up from ground at range, shorts, long and long rifle through it.

Have dozen or more guns sitting around dirty now. If it is used for defense/offense it is dirty. Most malfunctions have seen were due to improper reassembly after detailed cleaning. If you haven't ever missed something, send me a bottle of whatever your drinking. After clean my daily carries, lube and run a magazine through it to ensure all is good then wipe and drop in holster. Clean my bedside or truck rifles, shoot a few rounds before it goes into mission critical role. If it gets shot often, what the crap can happen? If it's going in the back of the vault for a decade, it gets cleaned, greased inside and out, top to bottom. The it must be cleaned if touched is a Pavlov's Dogs thing to program troops like public school kids move when the bell rings.

Well Said

19&41
August 08, 2016, 20:17
I do clean my firearms after each use. I don't scrape nor abrade them necessarily to clean them, but do the best I can with solvents. I grease them with synthetic grease and the grease holds much of the residues and prevents their adhering to the exposed surfaces. I use bronze and nylon brushes on the bore and gas handling areas. I usually clean the grease out with a degreaser and reapply. That is just how I do it. It works well for me. It does not make anyone else's way the wrong way.

hueyville
August 15, 2016, 02:03
I do clean my firearms after each use. I don't scrape nor abrade them necessarily to clean them, but do the best I can with solvents. I grease them with synthetic grease and the grease holds much of the residues and prevents their adhering to the exposed surfaces. I use bronze and nylon brushes on the bore and gas handling areas. I usually clean the grease out with a degreaser and reapply. That is just how I do it. It works well for me. It does not make anyone else's way the wrong way.

Doesn't make your way the wrong way but have seen someone else absolutely clean a gun the wrong way. Like running a multi piece cleaning rod through the bore of a nice custom barrel withour a chamber guide grinding on the throat or coming in from the muzzle grinding the rod against the rifling at crown. Seen people use solvents that dissolved the bedding compound and all sorts of goofyness. No, cleaning every time you shoot is not inherently wrong but have several pistols that get shot as much as five or six days a week. Believe running a brush down the bore several days a week has to introduce erosion.

Have a 1911 that is in this crowd along with a Hi Power and a Colt Diamondback in 38 Special. Not uncommon to put 500 to 1,000 rounds through them without an actual cleaning. Wipe them down with oily rag, put in vault and repeat next day. Shooting cast lead bullets and keeping springs replaced will near last forever if don't fool with too much. Imagine the wear from driving pins out several times per week, scrubbing all the parts and reassembly. Just removing grips a few times per week and would have to monkey up some slots and threads. The 10-22 shot thousands of rounds without cleaning slugged the bore before began and after, could not measure any appreciable wear. If had run a cleaning rod down barrel several hundred times bet it would have shown much more wear.

When take one of my collector guns out for a rare day at range, it gets cleaned and well oiled before return to vault. My shop squirrel rifle, can't remember last time was cleaned, been over a year and shot every week. At work in a zero tolerance area for misses. My business is in County but property three sides is city and shooting illegal thus all rounds must not cross property line. When gets dry add some oil and keep shooting.

95t-100
August 17, 2016, 11:22
I clean mine after a few range trips, mostly to make sure nothing is rusting since it is humid where I live. I also like to inspect the parts for unusual wear or breakage; this has never been an issue with my M1A but I have found cracked/broken parts in other rifles that could have been really dangerous if not corrected. After cleaning/inspecting I lightly grease my rifle with Lubriplate 130-A in the areas listed by Orlando.