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MilsurpMonkey
November 18, 2015, 21:08
Picked this up a while back, story was that a Korean war vet brought it back after striping it from a North Korean he had killed. All matching numbers, and all Albion marked parts. Hadn't heard of Albion before this little gem, apparently they were buisy building busses :rolleyes:

http://i1264.photobucket.com/albums/jj486/Milsurpmonkey/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20151118_175843965_zpsad7izvmh.jpg

http://i1264.photobucket.com/albums/jj486/Milsurpmonkey/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20151118_175915878_zpsavhgkckm.jpg

Retired Bum
November 18, 2015, 22:38
The Royal Small Arms Factory aka RSAF at Enfield Lock couldn't produce enough of the Enfield .38 revolvers to meet the demand for service handguns.

So Albion Motors in Scotland was given a contract to manufacture the Enfield. I read that it took some time to get the factory tooled up to begin production and even more time to train the Scottish lassies at the factory in revolver manufacture.

Apparently the British had a hard time getting enough handguns to outfit their military services. Webley & Scott were cranking out as many of their Mark IV .38's as they could and of course Smith & Wesson was producing the Victory Model for them as well. Something like 750,000 plus by the time the contract was cancelled in September 1945. Then there were those Inglis made Browning High Powers....

And so it goes.


The Retired One

MilsurpMonkey
November 18, 2015, 23:04
Yes, I was reading the same. I am trying to figure out how it got into North Korean hands.

VALMET
November 19, 2015, 06:15
Perhaps in Malaya and then made its way into N Korean hands. I've always thought the Albion guns were so cool. Nice score

justashooter
November 19, 2015, 11:24
quite possibly it was taken in by a chinese from a brit during the second war, then used in korea by said chinese, who lost it to korean possession.

Jarhead504
November 19, 2015, 19:26
Nice pistol brother. What caliber is it? I've always wanted a Webley too, mainly because they were participants in the wars.

Jarhead

MilsurpMonkey
November 19, 2015, 23:52
It's chambered in the British .38-200 (.38 S&W in the US) I just love old break top revolvers. And I collect war horses, so this fit the bill perfectly.

APEXgunparts
November 20, 2015, 01:34
Picked this up a while back, story was that a Korean war vet brought it back after striping it from a North Korean he had killed. All matching numbers, and all Albion marked parts. Hadn't heard of Albion before this little gem, apparently they were buisy building busses :rolleyes:

http://i1264.photobucket.com/albums/jj486/Milsurpmonkey/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20151118_175843965_zpsad7izvmh.jpg

http://i1264.photobucket.com/albums/jj486/Milsurpmonkey/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20151118_175915878_zpsavhgkckm.jpg

That is a VERY, VERY nice revolver!
I have sought an ALBION and a HaC (Howard Auto Cultivator) marked Enfield #2 MK1** revolver for quite some time.
These guns are now very popular.

Richard

Retired Bum
November 20, 2015, 01:51
The British military nomenclature for the round was .380 Inch SAA Ball. SAA stands for small arms ammunition. The load was a 178 grain FMJ and the .38 S&W case. Muzzle velocity is 650 fps +/- from a five inch barrel.

The S&W Victory Models made for the British were stamped on the right side of the barrel .38/200 CTG.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

MilsurpMonkey
November 20, 2015, 08:56
Actually, the British bound victory revolvers were roll marked with .38 S&W ctg as opposed to the American .38 S&W Special ctg. The British guns also wore a 5" barrel as opposed to the American 4" barrel. I've had a lot of victory revolvers over the years. There were also some extremely rare 2" models made for our airmen. I know where 2 of those are but the guy won't sell. Just recently sold an Austrian reichspoleizi marked British victory to aquire Colt Commando serial number 4x.

MilsurpMonkey
November 20, 2015, 09:08
That is a VERY, VERY nice revolver!
I have sought an ALBION and a HaC (Howard Auto Cultivator) marked Enfield #2 MK1** revolver for quite some time.
These guns are now very popular.

Richard

I've seen very few of the #2 MK1** revolvers, mainly just MK1* like mine. My favorites to shoot however are the single action Webley version and the early Enfield No2 Mk1 single actions, but finding one that hasn't been converted to Mk1* standard has been difficult. I'd just never heard of Albion before a friend brought this over to me at the gun show. He is in his later years and claims to have bought the gun in the 80s from the vet that brought it back. When he finds it, he has a photo that came with the gun of the vet holding it in his hand with a foot on the body of the soldier he took it from. I bought the revolver, not the story, but I get the photo when he finds it as well.