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Thundermaker
September 20, 2015, 17:57
https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/t31.0-8/12017444_879802402069714_6278583455788733283_o.jpg ?efg=eyJpIjoidCJ9

I'm looking for information. Searches put the value all over the place. Can anyone narrow it down? There is no box.

Also, the frame is an aluminum alloy. Does anyone know of any problems with frames cracking or warping?

Retired Bum
September 20, 2015, 18:43
I had a 1st issue Colt Cobra with the two inch barrel. Cobra's were also produced with three inch and four inch barrels.

Colt recommended that nothing higher than standard pressure ammo such as the old police service round which was the 158 grain RNL be shot in their alloy framed Cobra's and Agent's. Colt's LW aka Lightweight D frames were meant to be carried but shot little. A steady diet of standard pressure rounds can in time cause frame stretching and stress cracking. Firing +P rounds will only accelerate wear and tear. If you intend to use the Cobra for CCW purposes then I suggest something like the Federal 125 grain Nyclad hollowpoint. This round is standard pressure and should be safe in the revolver.

Cobra values. When I sold my minty Cobra complete with the original box I got $350 for it back in 2007. Today it would bring close to double that amount. As you have noted prices are all over the place. Are you buying or selling?

And so it goes.


The Retired One

FUUN063
September 20, 2015, 18:52
I've had several of these (and Agents) and they all worked just fine. However, yours is the later model and, around here, would fetch about $500.00 if cleaned up nicely and no nickel peeling, which is the most common problem I have seen. I carried one for a while, but the hammerless +P Smith's put mine on the shelf.

Leland

Thundermaker
September 20, 2015, 19:28
I had a 1st issue Colt Cobra with the two inch barrel. Cobra's were also produced with three inch and four inch barrels.

Colt recommended that nothing higher than standard pressure ammo such as the old police service round which was the 158 grain RNL be shot in their alloy framed Cobra's and Agent's. Colt's LW aka Lightweight D frames were meant to be carried but shot little. A steady diet of standard pressure rounds can in time cause frame stretching and stress cracking. Firing +P rounds will only accelerate wear and tear. If you intend to use the Cobra for CCW purposes then I suggest something like the Federal 125 grain Nyclad hollowpoint. This round is standard pressure and should be safe in the revolver.

Cobra values. When I sold my minty Cobra complete with the original box I got $350 for it back in 2007. Today it would bring close to double that amount. As you have noted prices are all over the place. Are you buying or selling?

And so it goes.


The Retired One

I was under the impression that nyclads haven't been around for quite some time. I'm neither buying nor selling at this time. I'm trying to determine whether I should carry it or sell it to a colt collector.

Retired Bum
September 20, 2015, 23:03
As I recall the first Nyclad ammo was produced by S&W starting in the 1980's. They offered the .38 Special round with the nylon coated 148 grain HBWC, the 158 grain LSWC, and the 125 grain LSWCHP.

When S&W dropped their ammo line they sold the trademark Nyclad to Federal Cartridge Company. I am not positive but I think that Federal only produced the 125 grain Nyclad in .38 Special. Then Federal quit producing the Nyclad line for some years and then reintroduced it about ten years ago or so. To the best of my knowledge the .38/125 grain load is still in production.

I have always been a big fan of the J frame Smiths for CCW. I got my state Concealed Handgun License back in 1971 and carried one of the then hard to get S&W Model 60's. Carried it for 20 years and then went to a Model 640 Centennial and now I pack a Model 642 Airweight. I am of the firm opinion that the J frame's are superior to the D frame Colts. I know that there are many who will disagree with me about this. I look at it this way, there are no more new Colt DA revolvers of any kind being made and it is unlikely that they will ever go back into production. OTOH S&W will be making J frames for the foreseeable future.

If it were my Cobra I would sell it to a collector for whatever one would be willing to pay and then buy something like a new S&W M642 no lock. Although it is an Airweight it is rated for +P 125 JHP and says so on the barrel.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

MAINER
September 21, 2015, 09:10
I'm a big fan of Colt's wheelguns, but after reading the article about "Snakeguns" in the Sept. American Rifleman, I'd be mighty tempted to sell that Cobra for some collector money and buy something new for a carry piece. Especially considering that the Cobra is not rated for +P and I have little confidence in a standard 38 Spec. load out of a 2" barrel for self-defense.

I never could afford a Python, but I did manage to pick up a King Cobra. Now, their telling me the thing is worth $2400? :uhoh:
Crap, I can't afford to shoot no twenty four hundred dollar handgun. :redface:

nearmisses
September 21, 2015, 13:02
You could sell it, buy a Ruger LCR in 357mag and still have money to buy ammo!

Thundermaker
September 21, 2015, 17:38
I guess I'll put it up for sale.

genmeagher
September 22, 2015, 20:38
I'm curious. What's the story behind those grips?

Thundermaker
September 22, 2015, 21:26
They're original. According to my colt expert friend, this is the last issue. They came with these grips. I have to say, they feel really good in the hand.