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Artful
August 15, 2015, 05:44
Krag-Jorgensen Safety Update

The NRA recently completed, on behalf of MoD, an investigation into an accident involving a Krag-Jorgensen rifle. The technical investigation revealed matters that the NRA believes should be brought to the attention of all owners of Krag-Jorgensen rifles. In particular, there is published information that a substantial number of K-R rifles were rebarreled shortly after World War II, and that the standard of work may have been unsatisfactory in some cases.

Aspects of the technical investigation into the rifle involved in the accident tend to confirm that information. Please see the attached redacted version of the accident report including the full detail of the findings regarding the rifle itself.

The NRA requires all members owning Krag-Jorgenson rifles fitted with replacement barrels (other than those replacements carried out under the current owner?s instructions and bearing proof marks issued under CIP regulations or by one of the UK proof houses) to have the rifle checked by a competent gunsmith before it is used under the auspices of the NRA

Andrew Mercer
Secretary General

http://www.nra.org.uk/common/files/news/15/KJ-Redacted-report-complete-v2.pdf

SWOHFAL
August 15, 2015, 13:43
Great job they did of taking critical, useful medical information and detailed information about the rifle and ammo out of the report along with victim ID and location, which is about the only thing that was questionable for inclusion. :rolleyes:

V guy
August 15, 2015, 20:26
The report clearly shows that the reloader of the ammo, was trained by Obama or some other klutz.

I guess the reloader had also never read about reduced powder load dangers, info that has been available for at least 40 years.

The old gunsmithing was questionable, but the bbl held up fine for 50 years.
I blame the shooter entirely.

RG Coburn
August 15, 2015, 20:57
I don't think the Krag was ever known for having the strongest action. Don't they have like one locking lug or something? Never see any built into belted magnums,like you might with an M1917 action.

V guy
August 16, 2015, 09:37
The bolt held.. probably by the bolt handle.

The photo of the LE Wilson case gage with cutaway section, clearly shows the improper resizing of the other cases......, and a huge bulge where the bullet was jammed into the case, and the neck collapsed.

The case was probably unable to expand in the chamber neck; the headspace was all screwed up by the lack of contact with the chamber neck at the shoulder...and with the borderline detonation of the powder....I am amazed the old Krag held up as well as it did.

Idjits.

meltblown
August 16, 2015, 10:53
Moron got a Darwin award pass this time. Yep brits always seem to be proficient at talking rather than common sense

kev
August 16, 2015, 12:31
The action held well. I think the kaboom may have been caused by a combination of the light load of slow burning powder and the poor quality of the reloads. That may be the cause of the over-pressure but it looks like the case blew at the unsupported area at the extractor relief cut in the barrel. Looks like that cut is too deep and it left a weak spot in the barrel containment. Once that spot blew the high pressure gas was released into the action and everything else let loose. The Norwegian Krag action actually has two locking lugs,.......one locking lug proper and the long guide rib which is always fitted to bear. Nobody has ever really been able to explain why the US Krag wasn't built that way from the start,.............the guide rib is there but isn't fit to bear any load,...........but it does act as a safety lug.

richbug
August 16, 2015, 14:12
The photo of the LE Wilson case gage with cutaway section, clearly shows the improper resizing of the other cases......, and a huge bulge where the bullet was jammed into the case, and the neck collapsed.




Hard to tell from the photo if it is a wrinkle, or the loader was "partial full length sizing"... Old timers way to neck size, and help the concentricity of the round when you don't have neck sizing dies.





No where in the report do I see them discounting a squib. Ball powder at 60% or so capacity has happened to me more than once.

Impala_Guy
August 16, 2015, 19:53
Just after the Spanish American war, the Army tried to up the performance of the 220 standard FMJ round nose bullet from 2000 to 2200 fps. This was an attempt to match the 7mm mauser that the Spaniards used, as the Krag Jorgensen was scapegoated for the number of US casualties in that war. The result was a bunch of cracked bolt lugs. They quickly discarded this load and recalled all the ammo but some still got out there and got shot. You should always check any US krag bolt for cracks when you headspace check a rifle for the first time. I have personally never found a cracked one, and using modern powders and loads rated safe for original krag actions, its possible to get close to the original 2200 fps that the Army had hoped for without excessive pressures. I have shot the Remington and Winchester factory loads, and hundreds of mild krag rated reloads without any problem, but I noticed a Norma case head in the pictures of that report. Some factory krag ammo is meant for Ruger#1 rifles, Winchester / Miroku made 1895, and other modern rifles and is quite a bit hotter. In a strong modern action the 30-40 can be upped close to 30-06 power levels.

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk299/PAguardguy/krag_A_zpsis62wzsd.jpg (http://s283.photobucket.com/user/PAguardguy/media/krag_A_zpsis62wzsd.jpg.html)

The krag action was hardened by heating it to around 1200 degrees and quenching it in oil. This was the same way that early 1903 Springfield actions were hardened and the imprecise temperatures and qualities of early steels are the reason low numbered 1903s would occasionally shatter with the much higher pressure 3006 cartridge. There were slight variations in the rifle over the model years, mainly the shapes of the stock wrist, the bolt cutout in the stock, and the magazine box shape. As other posters have noted, the krag had a long safety lug, and the bolt handle bears on the receiver as an extra measure of safety:

Model 1896 rifle and carbine:

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk299/PAguardguy/krag_C_zpsa6yx8ia9.jpg (http://s283.photobucket.com/user/PAguardguy/media/krag_C_zpsa6yx8ia9.jpg.html)

Model 1898 rifle and carbine:

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk299/PAguardguy/krag_B_zpsfu1knyc1.jpg (http://s283.photobucket.com/user/PAguardguy/media/krag_B_zpsfu1knyc1.jpg.html)

Sights changed over the years to suit the Armys requirements. I dont have an original 1894 rear sight, but it had a stepped ramp instead of the roller coaster ramp of the model 1896 rear sight. This is the 1896 "Rough Rider" carbine sight but the rifles was identical in shape, with different range markings:

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk299/PAguardguy/krag_D_zpsfmsprm96.jpg (http://s283.photobucket.com/user/PAguardguy/media/krag_D_zpsfmsprm96.jpg.html)

This was followed by the 1901 rear sight, which was virtually copied and carried over to the 1903 Springfield:

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk299/PAguardguy/krag_F_zpsmicsyymr.jpg (http://s283.photobucket.com/user/PAguardguy/media/krag_F_zpsmicsyymr.jpg.html)

During the Armys efforts to up the perfomance of the 180 grain load to 2200 fps, the 1898 rear sight was briefly issued but most were recalled when the ammo was. The 1902 rear sight was the last krag sight issued and is fairly close in appearance to the 1898 sight, except its graduations were re-cablibrated back down to the 2000 fps load:

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk299/PAguardguy/krag_G_zpsdgmybyws.jpg (http://s283.photobucket.com/user/PAguardguy/media/krag_G_zpsdgmybyws.jpg.html)

kev
August 16, 2015, 23:52
Great info and some beautiful old Krags but just a note,......

The rifle in the linked report is a Norwegian Krag in 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser, rebarreled in the original caliber. The Norwegian Krags are a step above the US manufactured guns in both material and heat-treat, along with a better execution of the design.

Impala_Guy
August 17, 2015, 06:03
Great info and some beautiful old Krags but just a note,......

The rifle in the linked report is a Norwegian Krag in 6.5x55 Swedish Mauser, rebarreled in the original caliber. The Norwegian Krags are a step above the US manufactured guns in both material and heat-treat, along with a better execution of the design.

Yes, true. My point was, the Krag is a perfectly safe design....if you stay within its design limits on ammo.

V guy
August 17, 2015, 11:25
I have a low time, '98 Krag carbine that was built in 1902, according to the cartouche.

Originally built as a rifle, it shortened to a carbine, like many of them back in the day.

Pretty handy deer rifle, like a model 7.
I have not reloaded for this calibre, so I use the Remington factory loads.

STGThndr
August 21, 2015, 19:30
Some fine old rifles there, HUGE cool factor.... Would imagine that they have taken their fair share of deer. I know one old guy (OK, so he's my age).. who has hunted Colorado for decades with an original condition Krag .30/40 carbine like the one pictured above by Impala Guy. He's rightfully proud of that firearm. Like me, he never parts with an oldie goldie gun, so he still has it and his sons will get it eventually instead of meeeee.
My old Great-Uncle Pete fought in the Span-Am war and left several fingers behind. He wouldnt talk about the war or how he lost those fingers. Dunno what happened to his rifle, his kids probably chopped it up and or sold it when he died in the 1960's...
The Krag is a fine firearm within it's limitations, don't try to make a .30-40 into a .30-06 or .308 and you'll be fine! They did well on Michigan deer back in the day and bested the .30-30's...