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D P Six
October 16, 2014, 19:09
I have read that a Ruger 10/22 is generally more accurate than a dedicated AR 22lr. If this is true, assuming both have quality triggers, fired from a rest, etc, why is this so? I am considering doing an Appleseed and while I prefer the AR platform I need any help I can get to include using a 10/22.

4x401
October 16, 2014, 20:21
I have read that a Ruger 10/22 is generally more accurate than a dedicated AR 22lr. If this is true, assuming both have quality triggers, fired from a rest, etc, why is this so? I am considering doing an Appleseed and while I prefer the AR platform I need any help I can get to include using a 10/22.


I find that a bit hard to swallow. In my experience, the Standard 10/22 holds no accuracy benefit over any other decently made .22.

I've RSO'd plenty of Appleseed events at my gun club. Participants predominantly shoot the 10/22, but I see plenty of Marlin/Glenfields, and various AR's with dedicated uppers as well as conversion kits installed in 5.56 uppers.

The premiss behind the Appleseed comp's isn't about winning...It's about Learning to run what ya brung...IE, becoming a Rifleman.

Grab a rifle, pay attention, and Have Fun!!

ETA

Though the Ruger was the predominant choice for most participants, they generally did no better from a scoring standpoint.

yellowhand
October 16, 2014, 22:32
I have read that a Ruger 10/22 is generally more accurate than a dedicated AR 22lr. If this is true, assuming both have quality triggers, fired from a rest, etc, why is this so? I am considering doing an Appleseed and while I prefer the AR platform I need any help I can get to include using a 10/22.

Got both, both good, can't tell any difference with mine.
Prefer the AR 22 over the Ruger, AR a lot easier to clean and 28 round mags for the AR 22 lr are a hell of a lot cheaper than the ruger.

tac-40
October 17, 2014, 08:58
Based upon my experiences shooting both, they are about on par with each other in stock form. True, you can add all the bells and whistles to each one or the other and improve the accuracy considerably, but I don't see that in the OP.

Now, AR's with the adapters installed are notorious for their inconsistant accuracy due to the bore diameter and the jump through the freebore of the adapter. Could this be the source of the OP reading material?

W.E.G.
October 17, 2014, 09:22
Hey, let's compare apples and aardvarks!

Either one can be built to shoot incredibly well if you spend enough money on them.

gunplumber
October 17, 2014, 10:03
There's also a big difference between a .22LR barrel on an AR, and merely a .22LR insert in an AR, so I guess it depends on what you mean by "dedicated".

I built an AR with a .22LR barrel. It's ok. But there is a lot more going on with it than dropping a match barrel on a 10/22. I went with the Spikes, but I'll never buy another product from those bastards.

One can get greater accuracy from a 10/22 with less money, but I built the AR because the kids wanted to shoot a gun that looked like an AR, not a 10/22.

fnogger
October 17, 2014, 11:02
They can be. Even in "stock" form (or at least appearance).

Basic 10/22 carbine from a pawn shop - $150-200

Trigger group to Brimstone for a Tier 3 job at $35, 2.5lbs

Barrel and bolt to Que for his work - square up bolt, ensure proper headspace, etc. Barrel is set back a hair and rechambered. $90

Whatever scope, dot, or irons (Tech Sights) you want. Some quality ammo (SK, Wolf, RWS, Norma, etc)

You'll have a rifle that looks just like it did coming out of the factory except for your sights/scope/dot. And it will shoot good groups, plenty for Appleseed, etc.

Tuhlmann
October 17, 2014, 11:25
Nearly every obstacle you will encounter on your journey to Rifleman will originate with the nut behind the bolt, not the rifle itself. Shoot what you like, it will matter little at 25 meters. Good trigger, good sights, and most importantly good fundamentals is what you need to succeed at a 'seed!

Scott V2
October 18, 2014, 06:09
I have been to two appleseed events. I missed rifleman by 2 points last time, it is the guy behind the trigger:whistling:

The 21 year old kid beside me shot a bone stock 10/22, with peep sites installed. He had only owned the rifle for several weeks and was a new shooter. He shot and got the rifleman badge. He was a natural:uhoh:

catmguy445
October 18, 2014, 09:47
I have been to two appleseed events. I missed rifleman by 2 points last time, it is the guy behind the trigger:whistling:

The 21 year old kid beside me shot a bone stock 10/22, with peep sites installed. He had only owned the rifle for several weeks and was a new shooter. He shot and got the rifleman badge. He was a natural:uhoh:

A natural = hasn't developed bad shooting habits yet and will listen to the instructor.

gunplumber
October 18, 2014, 11:13
A natural = hasn't developed bad shooting habits yet and will listen to the instructor.

Exactly why I like teaching women and children.

homelandprotector
October 19, 2014, 11:47
Years ago... My buddies Marlin out shot my 10/22 by far. He liked my mag loaded Ruger so we always carried eachothers gun, needless to say, I bagged many more Quail, squirrels and rabbits. because of the Marlins better accuracy.

I had an amaizing shot that I'll never forget, I saw a dove sitting in an Oak tree about 80 yards away.... I aimed about a foot above his head a the shot clipped his wings and he fell to the ground. 5 or 6 Doves make an excellent BBQ when you're 14 yrs old.

c0wb0y84
October 19, 2014, 22:15
I had an amaizing shot that I'll never forget, I saw a dove sitting in an Oak tree about 80 yards away.... I aimed about a foot above his head a the shot clipped his wings and he fell to the ground. 5 or 6 Doves make an excellent BBQ when you're 14 yrs old.

I heard enough tales of young boys being whooped red by their daddies or grandaddies for shooting sitting birds to know that it was in my best interest to not play those odds. I think dove would make an excellent BBQ regardless of age.:smile: