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catmguy445
February 26, 2014, 12:27
I'm in the process of converting a DR200 back into a real rifle, and have taken the butthole stock off and added a Stormwerkz stock adaptor and folding mechanism and one of s0b3's pistol grips to it so far. The next step is an Ace skeleton stock, and she'll be almost ready to go.

The last thing that, in my opinion, needs to be done is to get rid of the fake flash hider and put a real one on the muzzle. From what I can see, it looks like the fake one is silver soldered in place. I don't have an oxyacetylene torch to heat it up with in order to take it off, plus I'm not absolutely positive that it really is silver solder that's holding it on.

Does anybody know for sure about that? Also, does anyone know if the DR200 muzzle is threaded underneath the fake f/h or not? I know that if I send it to Moses, he can get the fake one off and thread the muzzle, or machine slots in the fake one to convert it to an M16A2 type. So how hard is it to get the fake one off of the rifle?

Stoney
February 26, 2014, 15:56
A torch will take it off, its screwed on, but the threads are longer then a AR-15 flash hider replacement. Get a die to clean up the threads after you get it off.

catmguy445
February 26, 2014, 18:21
A torch will take it off, its screwed on, but the threads are longer then a AR-15 flash hider replacement. Get a die to clean up the threads after you get it off.

That's a good start. Thanks for the info. Are the threads right or left hand, and what diameter and pitch are they? The US threads are 1/2-28, but I suspect that Daewoo threads are probably metric. Yes? No? Maybe?

vandal968
February 26, 2014, 22:02
Same threads as an AR-15 except threaded for a slightly longer distance. Cheers, v

s0b3
February 26, 2014, 23:47
the heat it would take to remove the silver solder may discolor the barrel. if you were going to shorten the barrel, it may be a good idea to get it cut down to 16" and then threaded to AR15 spec thread length. that way you won't need to run a jamb nut to take up the extra threads.

ftierson
February 27, 2014, 00:25
I have seen both silver soldiered (which I assume was the most common method) and welded slot-less devices on the muzzle of DR-200s...

Since I have a real aversion to heating the barrel at the muzzle, I just left the original DR200 'device' on when I 'fixed' the rest of the rifle.

The rifle shoots great and the original device doesn't bother me TOO much...

Forrest

wayne in boca
February 27, 2014, 05:47
I took mine off with MAPP gas and it did discolor the barrel,but it cleaned up pretty good with a brass brush and some CLP.I think the discoloration is mostly burned oil.I got a K2 repro flash suppressor from Daewoo Rifle Parts and it still shoots great and looks correct.They had to heat it to silver solder it,so you aren't doing anything they haven't already done at the factory.

ftierson
February 27, 2014, 11:04
I took mine off with MAPP gas and it did discolor the barrel,but it cleaned up pretty good with a brass brush and some CLP.I think the discoloration is mostly burned oil.I got a K2 repro flash suppressor from Daewoo Rifle Parts and it still shoots great and looks correct.They had to heat it to silver solder it,so you aren't doing anything they haven't already done at the factory.

I understand...

I didn't say that my aversion to 're'heating the muzzle was rational, just that I still have the aversion.

But there I still am... :)

Forrest

Zenkoanhead
March 02, 2014, 00:00
Having added linear comps to every rifle I own with a threaded barrel, I see no reason to replace the unported flashhider. What do you gain, except looks? Having shortened the thumbhole stock and filled it with plumbers putty, I am actually pretty pleased with the handling. One of these days I will chance upon a folding stock model for comparison.

ftierson
March 02, 2014, 12:06
By the way, I should mention that I have personally seen two DR-200s that had the muzzle device welded on instead of silver-soldered on...

In both cases the welding applied sufficient heat to leave a 'burn ring' in the bore. This was not just a heat discoloration problem.

One of these rifles was one that I ordered from Nationwide Sports Distributors (with Kimber markings).

I returned the rifle for replacement, and the replacement that I received (and still have), also Kimber marked, had a muzzle device that was soldered on and displayed no bore damage. It also had a serial number much lower (in the low 900 range, with an RA prefix) than the first, welded rifle.

For what it's all worth...

Forrest

DYNOMIKE
March 07, 2014, 13:34
Barrel is to long on a DR anyway..
I had mine cut back to a more desirable length and then threaded..
Much better in every way IMO....

Big Dave Lucas
March 07, 2014, 22:37
Both of my Woo's had soldered muzzle devices. After removing them I cut them at the base where there is a ring and used that for my spacer with an M-16/M4 flash suppressor.

Twizdd
March 08, 2014, 16:23
^ This is what I did also, but pulling the barrel to have it shortened very soon.
Mine was Silver Soldered and we used a MAPP torch also.

Dirt1042
March 10, 2014, 21:08
I had mine cut and rethreaded. Handles a little better and I can change the MD to whatever I want and whenever I want. Right now it's rockin' a phantom FH. Thinkin of puttin on a SPikes or Battle comp. My Woo is one of my favorite to shoot and the brass get flung pretty far on the lowest setting. Love that I can adjust the gas setting.

Sicarius
March 11, 2014, 12:44
I used Mapp gas. My friend had some heat gel that we squirted everywhere. Twisted it off with a pipe wrench and called it a day.
Kevin