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View Full Version : I picked up a project Remington model 41 Targetmaster


Guy-epic
December 16, 2013, 16:45
I have a son about to turn 3 years old. I have been buying different firearms for him to use in his future. I was looking for a single shot .22. This fell into my lap, the good news is it works great, just needs to be made to look pretty I don't worry about damaging the value as they made a lot of them. My questions are what would you guys do to make it look great. I am feeling a little over my head on refinishing this stock. Who is out there that is affordable to refinish the stock? I am thinking just paint the metal. Keep it simple. What do you guys think and what do you know about these?

74590

MAINER
December 16, 2013, 20:40
I would use Brownell's "OXPHO-BLUE" on the metal parts. I've tried lots of cold bluing, this is the best so far.

You shouldn't have a problem refinishing the stock. The biggest mistake most people make is being TOO aggressive with the sand paper and not using a block or backer to keep from rounding the edges. A backer is also needed to keep from making hollows creating a wavy surface.

Depending on the present surface, all you need do is remove the finish. Varnish is often used on these older rifles and is easily scrapped off with a Cabinet scrapper.

Tung oil is a simple finish, easily applied and looks great.

Nice old blue steel and walnut .22 rifle. I can't tell much about the stock, looks OK in the pic. The metal bluing is worn thin and will look much better with three or more coats of OXPHO_BLUE.

Poccur
December 16, 2013, 20:43
Do you have a better pic of the stock? Might not need too much refinishing...

If I was stripping it I would remove the finish, lightly sand and steam the dents/dings, stain with golden oak or mahogany then finish with tung oil...
Lots of 0000 steel wool in between...

If I wanted to maintain the look, I have had some good success in removing the top layers of crud, using 0000 wool to remove some finish and then use tung oil on top.

I am just an enthusiastic amateur...

angusmac
December 16, 2013, 22:08
I wouldn't change a thing. :whiskey:

Timber Wolf
December 17, 2013, 12:33
I wouldn't change a thing. :whiskey:

This;)

45collector
December 17, 2013, 12:38
This;)

and 3rd'd. Give it to him in all it's original glory when he's of age and let him decide if he wants to funk with it to make it "prettier". :biggrin:

Guy-epic
December 17, 2013, 16:23
and 3rd'd. Give it to him in all it's original glory when he's of age and let him decide if he wants to funk with it to make it "prettier". :biggrin:

It's actually pretty ruff when you look at it up close. I have a offer from a very kind member to refinish the stock. He will rename nameless until he says it is ok to say he has offered and done so for me. And I am going to order the stuff to cold blue the barrel. I want it to look new when I give it to him.

45collector
December 17, 2013, 16:27
I want it to look new when I give it to him.

Nothing wrong with that either. If he keeps it for many years and it gets worn down to the condition it's currently at now, he can say "look at all the use I got out of this rifle and it's still a tackdriver!!" :)

tac-40
December 17, 2013, 20:19
I used Fornbys to refinish one rifle stock. Turned out pretty nice. Not traditional looking.

Another way to go is to get a spray can of citrus strip from Wal-mart or other store. After removing the metal, spray it on, let it set, and scrub it off with a plastic scouring pad. After scrubbing, hose it off with the garden hose. Let dry and re-apply as needed. Citris Strip is non-toxic and biodegradable. After removing all of the old finish, let the stock air dry in your house in a closet for about a week. Use 3M finshing pads to remove the lifted grain. Apply finish and sand with finishing pads after each coat dries. I use Behr Tung Oil finish. After 5 or 6 coats you get a nice satin finish with the wood grain highlighted. Looks like a military oil finish.

Not hard to do, you just need to go slow and take your time. Don't get heavy handed with the sanding. To lift out dents, just dab the dent with a wet cloth to moisten and use a hot clothes iron to heat. The steam generated will lift the dent. Scratches can be filled or just sanded out to blend in with the surrounding wood.

fnogger
December 19, 2013, 15:48
Is yours pre or post serial ? (barrel and receiver are all 1 piece, serial if there is under the wood just at the end of the forearm)

I had a low (4 digit) serial one, fairly accurate. Hated how the bolt/FP would unscrew when safety was switched, but I think I was missing a part. Fairly accurate though.

Guy-epic
December 22, 2013, 19:39
Is yours pre or post serial ? (barrel and receiver are all 1 piece, serial if there is under the wood just at the end of the forearm)

I had a low (4 digit) serial one, fairly accurate. Hated how the bolt/FP would unscrew when safety was switched, but I think I was missing a part. Fairly accurate though.

Serial number is at end of barrel. It is a tack driver for sure. In fact it may be the best shooting .22 I have. I have about ten .22's and this one is special. I literally put three shots together in a clover leaf at 35 yards. I know that is not that far out there. But that was using the steel sights and not even touching them. We have a summer competition that has a stage that is not timed. It is your best five shots I think you have 15 minutes but that is not a issue. Best five you shoot six kinda cool

TXscout
December 26, 2013, 09:03
Remove the receiver, bbl, and trigger assembly from the stock and strip or lightly sand the finish. Put a wet towel over the stick and proceed to steam the dents out, with a hot iron. For deep gouges/dings use a soaking wet towel and a soldering iron.

Lightly sand again, then stain and seal with tung oil. Rub until you get a nice, smooth, finish.

Oxpho-Blue is a superb finish for the metal. Be sure to degrease well first.

Might as well protect/preserve the thing so he can hand it down to his son, later.

Guy-epic
December 28, 2013, 20:24
On ting oil high or low gloss?

MAINER
December 29, 2013, 12:41
A matter of personal taste perhaps, but it would be low gloss if it were my rifle. I like sheen over shine.


ps; By chance, I happened to see a nice Rem 41 in a Gunshop this past week. They were asking $200 for it. They also had a rather strange Winchester Model 55, don't believe I'd seen one before.