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ByrnieMac
September 05, 2013, 12:07
So a close family member recently decided to arm herself. I helped her pick out a gun a couple days ago. Not having much experience with firearms, I steered her in the direction of a nice wheel gun. No slide to rack, magazine to worry about if its seated properly, no crazy safeties everywhere. Just simple trigger and cylinder. We found a S&W Model 637 AirWeight .38 SPL +P and I thought that it fit the bill quite nicely. Price was right, so she bought it. I threw some Pachmayr grips on it and it fits her hands perfectly.

http://i1240.photobucket.com/albums/gg492/Byrnie_Mac/IMG_20130903_191009_263_zps5e2e2de5.jpg (http://s1240.photobucket.com/user/Byrnie_Mac/media/IMG_20130903_191009_263_zps5e2e2de5.jpg.html)

But she is having a difficult time distinguishing the sights so I thought about painting them, but are there any other options that might work better? The front sight is integral, so I can't swap it out for a fiber optic one.

I've seen guys who file down the ramp a bit, and it turned out nice. But just looking for some opinions here

mpnv
September 05, 2013, 12:28
I put Crimson Laser Grips on mine. Works Great.

croftonaviation
September 05, 2013, 15:45
All of my fixed sight revolvers have a painted orange front sight, and a black painted rear sight. Nail polish works rather well.

Really that's your easiest least costly option.

W.E.G.
September 05, 2013, 16:29
Paint the sights whatever ridiculous color you think will go with her nails.

You can add ray-guns and anything else.

When the time comes that she will ever need to use that thing for its intended purpose, one of three things will happen.
1. She won't have it when she needs it; or
2. The attacker will take it away from her; or
3. She won't use the sights or the ray gun.

Forget about the sights and the ray gun.

Have her practice presenting the weapon from the carry device she will use most.
She needs to be able to deliver 4 out of 5 shots onto a silhouette target at 3 yards in under two seconds.

Without using the sights.

FUUN063
September 05, 2013, 19:00
Yep, practice drawing the weapon, pointing in the general direction and hitting the target. A reloader may as well be carried in her car and one in her purse, too. Always have it on her person ready to put into action. Practice, practice, practice. Mostly at point blank out to about 10 feet.


Leland
:fal:

abbynormal
September 05, 2013, 21:41
An Airweight J frame is not a beginners gun. Train them on a K,L or N frame first. Then transition them to a M60 or M38 full weight J frame to learn the size and sights.

THEN, when they are competent and accurate with the steel J frame, let them try an Airweight J frame.

An Airweight can be a deadly accurate gun out to 100 yds, but you must be proficient in revolver basics and J frame handling before tackling one. Otherwise, it will take ad infinitum ; ammo, practice, patience and training to become proficient. Or one will lose confidence in the Airweight!

Sijones
September 05, 2013, 22:17
An Airweight J frame is not a beginners gun!

That is FOR SURE!

Wildcat
September 05, 2013, 23:27
An Airweight J frame is not a beginners gun. Train them on a K,L or N frame first.

+1

A 4" K frame would be a better place to start.

.....and since it is a revolver; practice reloading. Never load it straight from the carton. Put the ammo into whatever loader that will be carried (Comp-I or speedstrip) and charge the gun using the loader every time. It will seem silly at first but it reinforces the loading procedure that would be needed under stress. Repetition is beneficial.

ByrnieMac
September 06, 2013, 07:17
Well I appreciate all the training advice. There are some good points in here.

I was really trying to talk about the sights, though. I can't teach her the basics of marksmanship if she can't see the front sight.

Any solid reasoning why the J frame isn't good to start out on? I have known air weight frames to be a bit snappy, but other than that, why is it better to have another frame style?

By the way, here is the front sight after I painted it
http://i1240.photobucket.com/albums/gg492/Byrnie_Mac/IMG_20130905_205738_924_zps036d3cb0.jpg (http://s1240.photobucket.com/user/Byrnie_Mac/media/IMG_20130905_205738_924_zps036d3cb0.jpg.html)

Timber Wolf
September 06, 2013, 07:38
I have hi-viz yellow on my competition revos with fixed front sights. I bought a set of kid paint at Mart-Mart for $3 and change. The yellow seems to work best for me but I have guns that came to me painted orange and they work too. It is cheap enough to play with.

ByrnieMac
September 06, 2013, 13:34
Yeah I've heard that yellow is very good to go with, especially for low light environments, but I had some fluorescent orange in the garage...

Jailguard
September 06, 2013, 16:26
The Airweight is just kind of hard on the hand with full power loads

abbynormal
September 06, 2013, 18:30
"Any solid reasoning why the J frame isn't good to start out on? I have known air weight frames to be a bit snappy, but other than that, why is it better to have another frame style?"

OK, here we go....

1. The fixed sights on a J frame SUCK PERIOD. They are too small for a newby to get a hold on the art of target alignment.

2. The J frame was intended to be used as either a backup weapon for Cops or primary weapon for desk jockey's and Detectives. All of the above were expected to have been trained and qualified in shooting.

3. The small frame size and sight radius make misses "bigger". That is, the is ABSOLUTELY NO ROOM FOR SIGHTING ERRORS. A larger frame gun, you can missalign the sight slightly and still get a good hit. With a J frame, a tiny error in sighting causes a guaranteed miss.

4. The frame size is small and with no forward weight, the gun does not "balance" in the hand and wrist and is not as steady to hold.

5. The finesse things one must do to shoot a J frame accurately are more easily, quickly and cheaply learned on a larger frame gun.

6. As you said, a J frame recoil is snappy and can turn a newby off.

7. Do to all of the above, a newby can quickly and frequently does lose confidence in their abilities and the weapon. I've seen plenty of wive's that were "taught to shoot" by hubby with his J frame thinking the small size would be a good training piece.. It turned them off and took lots of persuasion to convince them to try again. This time I let them shoot a K22 or Medium sized .22 auto and they got the theory and quickly became good shots and began to enjoy shooting.

ALL FAL
September 07, 2013, 16:47
One could load some squib loads and increase powder and bullet weight as she gets more accomplished with the revolver.

ByrnieMac
September 11, 2013, 20:39
One could load some squib loads and increase powder and bullet weight as she gets more accomplished with the revolver.

She's fine with the .38 SPL ammo all day long. I advised her to shoot the normal .38 at the range and carry +P hollow points. Because if/when she has to use it, I bet she won't even notice the difference with the adrenaline going