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Elwarpo
January 30, 2013, 09:52
I am looking for one and know S&W started adding locks and other junk. What years are good for a used one. Also do they still put locks on new ones?

Retired Bum
January 30, 2013, 13:38
The best of the Model 57's were made from 1964 when the .41 Magnum was introduced to about 1990 IMHO. I have owed three of the 57's all made in the late 70's which were pinned and recessed. Very nicely made and finished for a mass produced revolver. The early 657's I saw and handled were also decently made and finished.

Yes, S&W continues to put the internal lock on all of its new N frame revolvers as far as I know. Even the so called "Classics". I will not own a S&W with the lock which means no new ones for me. But I have about 40 older Smiths in a wide variety of calibers and barrel lengths. Like a Triplelock in .455 Webley....

And so it goes.


The Retired One

Elwarpo
January 30, 2013, 14:10
Thanks, I was more interested in the 657 because of the stainless. I like shooting them and find the blueing starts showing wear along the backstrap. Time to look for an older 657.

BUFF
January 30, 2013, 16:24
The M-657 began selling in 1986.

M-657-1 (1988) changed the yoke retention and stud radius design, floating hand, no biggie.

M-657-2 (1990) got longer cylinder locking notches, no biggie.

M-657-3 (1994) got topstap drilled and tapped for optic, under new rear sight, new extractor design. Still okay.

M-657-4 (1997) got frame major redesign to eliminate cylinder stop lug, MIM hammer and trigger, some lockwork changes. Work fine but unsightly to most.

M-657-5 (2001) got internal key lock added. Unsightly, occasionally fails.

M-657-6 (2005) two piece barrel design began. Really unsightly.

I would look for 657-3 and earlier. The newer guns usually work fine, are marginally stronger and accurate, and the lifetime warranty is a great thing, but they look crappy to us S&W tradtitionalists.

Elwarpo
January 31, 2013, 10:01
Thanks, I am also a S&W traditionalist with a few older models. 657-3 and older it is.

K. Funk
January 31, 2013, 16:51
I have a pinned and recessed 57 and a new Classic 57. As much as I don't like the locks, I have to admit that the new Smiths shoot VERY well. These would include a 21-4, a 686+, a Classic 25 and a Classic 57. All with locks and all shoot magnificently.

krf

W.E.G.
January 31, 2013, 18:11
A little blue-wearing just makes it look like its been loved.

1911guy
February 01, 2013, 10:01
I'm looking for a Model 58, 4". Anyone know of the whereabouts of one?

Retired Bum
February 01, 2013, 12:57
A Model 58 four inch .41 Magnum you say?

Why yes I do. Buried in my gunsafe next to a four inch Model 57. I bought the M58 about 12 years ago on consignment sale for a whole whopping $350 plus tax. I don't know what the current market value of an original specimen in about 95 percent is valued at today. No box or papers and it is not an ex LEA weapon. A $1000? Blue Book prices are just about useless at this time due to the gun buying frenzy and Model 58's have commanded higher prices in the last few years due to the demand for these older classics.

No, mine isn't for sale at this time.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

BUFF
February 02, 2013, 00:15
"I'm looking for a Model 58, 4". Anyone know of the whereabouts of one?"

The Model 58 is available in a new "Classic" version, complete with fixed sights, heavy 4 inch barrel, MIM lockwork parts and keyed internal lock. Model 58-1 and they have been shipping some for the last year.

The originals were made from 1964 until 1979, but they were not fast sellers and there were still some in the pipeline for some years more; I bought mine new in 1978.

Seems shooters are funny people, they don't want to buy some guns until the guns are discontinued because they are slow sellers, and then everybody wants one once they can't have a new one any more. That's what happened with the Model 58. They have become sort of a cult favorite among S&W revolver fans, representing an old school, bare knuckle, brute sort of service handgun. Clean ones run $600 and up, unfired examples in their original boxes easily fetch $1,000 and up.

Best places to find them at reasonable prices are local shops and gun shows where the sellers aren't current on what the guns bring to some audiences, or web sites like Gun Broker when the seller has a reasonable 'buy it now' price.

Hot-fal
February 07, 2013, 09:45
"I'm looking for a Model 58, 4". Anyone know of the whereabouts of one?"

The Model 58 is available in a new "Classic" version, complete with fixed sights, heavy 4 inch barrel, MIM lockwork parts and keyed internal lock. Model 58-1 and they have been shipping some for the last year.

The originals were made from 1964 until 1979, but they were not fast sellers and there were still some in the pipeline for some years more; I bought mine new in 1978.

Seems shooters are funny people, they don't want to buy some guns until the guns are discontinued because they are slow sellers, and then everybody wants one once they can't have a new one any more. That's what happened with the Model 58. They have become sort of a cult favorite among S&W revolver fans, representing an old school, bare knuckle, brute sort of service handgun. Clean ones run $600 and up, unfired examples in their original boxes easily fetch $1,000 and up.

Best places to find them at reasonable prices are local shops and gun shows where the sellers aren't current on what the guns bring to some audiences, or web sites like Gun Broker when the seller has a reasonable 'buy it now' price.

I was in the gunshop yesterday, very slim pickings on Revolvers.. Owner said they are just not available..Even 38spec.???

Elwarpo
June 07, 2013, 23:39
Did they ever make a silhouette version of the 657 (4 position front sight)? I love my older 686 Silhouette and want to give it a big brother.

BUFF
June 08, 2013, 00:51
I don't believe so, just the M-586 and 686 L frames in .357 and the Model 29 N frames in .44 Magnum.

Elwarpo
June 19, 2013, 10:10
So I just found a like new 657-2 classic hunters and bought it. Made in 2001 and no lock.

I reload, is .41mag like .357 mag where under 900 fps you can go with lead and over 900 fps copper is the way to go.

Retired Bum
June 19, 2013, 15:30
I started handloading for the .41 Rem Mag back in 1980. I have two bullet molds for the .41 and cast bullets as needed.

To answer your question, lead alloy bullets can be driven faster than 900 fps depending on how hard the alloy is. One of my molds throws a 215 gr gas check SWC. I "heat treat" the cast bullet before swaging on the gas check. I can drive this bullet at over 1200 fps in my 6.5 inch Ruger NM Blackhawk with very little barrel leading.

The other bullet I cast is a 180 gr SWC that was designed for the .41 Action Express round. I used to fool around with that cartridge years ago. This bullet is a plain base design and I use it for light loads. I keep the velocity down to about 900 fps in the four inch Model 57. I heat treat this bullet and get no barrel leading after 100 rounds.

What it all comes down to is the alloy used to cast the bullet and how hard it is. Heat treating is a PITA job but in the long run it pays off for me. Jacketed .41 bullets are expensive and I don't shoot many of them these days due to the cost and scarcity. Finding componets for the .41 Mag can be a real challenge these days.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

Elwarpo
June 24, 2013, 10:07
Thanks, I found out Berry's makes a copper plated .41 bullet, and I will start reloading these. I am curious to see how fast i can go without leading. I also ordered 200 rounds from Georgia Arms, this will give me some range ammo and cases.

Elwarpo
June 24, 2013, 10:16
Thanks, I found out Berry's makes a copper plated .41 bullet, and I will start reloading these. I am curious to see how fast i can go without leading. I also ordered 200 rounds from Georgia Arms, this will give me some range ammo and cases.

Elwarpo
July 02, 2013, 21:02
Well I went shooting with it and it shoots awesome, 6 rounds touching at 7 yards and 4" group at 25 yards. Thanks to all of you who helped me find the right one.