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Redec
January 11, 2013, 23:30
I finally got my barrel timed on my sarco argy kit. Now I need to take the extractor out to head space my rifle for the correct locking shoulder.

I tried just putting the gauge in the extractor but it refuses to line up correctly while in the rifle. I can do it outside the rifle though......don't ask me...

I need to clean the extractor anyways. I get the plunger as far down as I can and the extractor is catching something and not coming out. I can push the extractor forwards enough to catch the plunger from shooting up but that's it. This is my first FAL but damn I am putting everything I have to push the plunger down as far as I can and it's not enough. I made the extractor tool from the forum and it bends ways before it comes close to coming out.

Any advice?

Redec
January 11, 2013, 23:46
Got it. I had to work it out. I am going to look over it for burs and such. Hopefully it's because it's dirty.

Redec
January 11, 2013, 23:57
I hate to keep posting in my own post, its like I am talking to myself lol. There is something in the middle of the spring. At first glance it looks like a roll pin to act like a stopper, but after further inspection I think its <s>carbon and muck</s> a damper. I looked up the extractor spring and its just a spring. I am guessing this is why I could not get the plunger down far enough to remove the extractor without almost killing myself.

I decided to take just a little off the edge with an exact o blade so maybe it will not be so hard to get the extractor out next time.

http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e94/Redec/FAL/DSC_0236_zps3874f4ae.jpg

STG_58_guy
January 12, 2013, 11:43
I asked the same question once about that little piece of fuzz in the spring and all the Yodas here said "leave it alone it is supposed to be there". I followed their advice.

Those extractors are hard to remove. I have one that all my might (which ain't much) could not remove. So I'm engineering a better tool.

I have not stabbed myself yet, or shot the parts across the room. I've removed maybe 10? So I'm counting myself lucky.

If you can convince yourself that the ejector mechanism is not stopping the forward motion of the bolt (by interfering with the barrel in any way), you can head space with the ejector in place. Here is how I would do it:

Mount a GO gage in the bolt and use gage pins in the locking shoulder hole, starting with larger sizes, and keep going smaller until can close the bolt with two thumbs pressure. That pin diameter MIGHT be your locking shoulder size.

Now take the GO gage off and see if you can close the bolt on an empty chamber with a pin .004 larger than your locking shoulder sized pin. If it goes, your bolt probably wasn't bottoming out on the extractor.

I have a precision gage set so I would do this using slightly larger gages to ensure alignment during my test.

You could ensure alignment by pulling a bullet off a 7.62 round and dumping the powder. Then saw the shell in half (I use a copper pipe cutter). Deburr, and use the ass end mounted in the bolt to ensure alignment. A smart fellow might pop the primer in another rifle, or decap the cartridge. The idea here is that without a shoulder, the bolt continues forward unimpeded.

You can't use a fired case for this because they will fit tight in the chamber, messing up your test.

I don't recommend deviating from the standard method of removing the extractor.

Good luck to you.

STG_58_guy
January 12, 2013, 11:47
I asked the same question once about that little piece of fuzz in the spring and all the Yodas here said "leave it alone it is supposed to be there". I followed their advice.

Those extractors are hard to remove. I have one that all my might (which ain't much) could not remove. So I'm engineering a better tool.

I have not stabbed myself yet, or shot the parts across the room. I've removed maybe 10? So I'm counting myself lucky.

If you can convince yourself that the ejector mechanism is not stopping the forward motion of the bolt (by interfering with the barrel in any way), you can head space with the ejector in place. Here is how I would do it:

Mount a GO gage in the bolt and use gage pins in the locking shoulder hole, starting with larger sizes, and keep going smaller until can close the bolt with two thumbs pressure. That pin diameter MIGHT be your locking shoulder size.

Now take the GO gage off and see if you can close the bolt on an empty chamber with a pin .004 larger than your locking shoulder sized pin. If it goes, your bolt probably wasn't bottoming out on the extractor.

I have a precision gage set so I would do this using slightly smaller gages and bigger pins to ensure alignment during my test, with the goal that I can move the bolt .001 or .002 farther forward than my intended lock-up position without interference.

You could ensure alignment by pulling a bullet off a 7.62 round and dumping the powder. Then saw the shell in half (I use a copper pipe cutter). Deburr, and use the ass end mounted in the bolt to ensure alignment. A smart fellow might pop the primer in another rifle, or decap the cartridge. The idea here is that without a shoulder, the bolt continues forward unimpeded.

You can't use a fired case for this because they will fit tight in the chamber, messing up your test.

I don't recommend deviating from the standard method of removing the extractor.

Good luck to you.

J. Armstrong
January 12, 2013, 12:49
The piece of metal inside the spring is a damper. I believe it was originally developed to improve reliability during full auto firing, and is not strictly necessary for semi only use.

That said, I always leave it in.

Redec
January 12, 2013, 15:49
I have not stabbed myself yet, or shot the parts across the room. I've removed maybe 10? So I'm counting myself lucky.


That's funny you said that. In the picture you cannot see it, but I rammed a small phillips head screw driver into my middle finger. Made a nice hole.

I did get the extractor out. The damper is rubber so I trimmed a little and hope that helps when I put it back together.

I am doing some reading on what LS to get. The .258 pin worked w/ very little pushing of the bolt carrier needed. No-go made the bolt/carrier fail to close like it should.

The .260 pin I was able to shut with the go gauge using some effort. More like 1 - 1.5 thumb pressure:rofl:. No-go didn't allow it to close of course.

The .262 would not shut at all. I put some good pressure with not luck. So I am guessing a .260 LS would be perfect.

R1shooter
January 12, 2013, 22:55
The piece in the spring should be hard rubber and was for vibration during full auto fire.

malpaismike
January 12, 2013, 23:54
Hello the camp! I had trouble with the home-made tool at first. While it did the deed, it bent all to hell and had to be reshaped. I solved this with a ss rod from the Ace Hdwe hobby matl display. I measured and bent my 'crank' to match my claw [fashioned from a piece of fish tape, ie tough stuff], and it's performed yeoman's labor since. Perseverance beats $45, last I saw store-boght for. hth mm