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LaConservationist
March 24, 2012, 08:46
Well I am looking at building a 10/22 using the TS .920 threaded barrel and Hogue stock. First I have to find the 10/22 to start with as this is one of the .22 rifles I sadly do not own!
Is there in pointers, steps/issues that you guys may have came across that you could save me from?

Many thanks!

LaC

PS: If you have a build worthy 10/22 you would consider parting with PLEASE let me know!!

Jaxxas
March 24, 2012, 12:34
Pricey but Volquartsen makes a 10/22 receiver. Mine will shoot MOA with good ammo. It has a 20" Green Mountain SS barrel. They go together pretty easy. Rimfire Sports & Custom is a nice place to go browsing.


https://www.volquartsen.com/products/887-replacement-receiver

http://www.rimfiresports.com/merchant.mv



Here is mine, it has a different scope now, but I don't have a recent picture.

http://i587.photobucket.com/albums/ss317/The_JaXXas/IMG_0202.jpg

gunplumber
March 24, 2012, 12:44
That is the configuration I went with. The one thing I didn't like about the TS barrel was the flutes are interrupted under the stock. I see this at least theoretically causing an uneven expansion in the barrel. So I extended the bottom flutes.

I like the Volquartson mag catch. Other than that, I did a trigger job on the existing parts with an over-travel set screw in the trigger, drilled a cleaning rod hole in the back of the receiver, jeweled the bolt, and modified the bolt bolt-open to release automatically (cut protrusion off, leaving a rounded triangle). They are otherwise stock. My goal was to make as light-weight as possible. With the Leupold 2x7 rimfire compact, they are sub 5#. I went with the millet rings because I think the Leupolds scratch the scope too easily. Base I don't recall manufacturer. I'd prefer it to be a bit shorter.

I had the rifles already - bought them when they wer about $100. So I'min them maybe $750 each.


http://www.arizonaresponsesystems.com/wp/tmgruger1022-01.jpg

http://www.arizonaresponsesystems.com/wp/tmgruger1022-02.jpg

catmguy445
March 24, 2012, 13:30
LaC,

I'm not really the world's leading expert on 10/22's, but I do have 7 of them in various flavors, and have built one for smallbore target competition and done a lot of work on the internals on some of the others to improve functioning.

Some things I'd recommend are replacing the stock hammer and sear assembly. Most factory 10/22 triggers are bad at best, and some are truly awful. Volquartsen and Power Custom both make kits to improve trigger pull for under a hundred bucks (I've used both, with identical results), and if you want to get fancy, Timney and Kidd both make an entire trigger housing with all the internals which have a very light, crisp trigger for around $200, give or take a few bucks. They're also a drop in replacement. You take two pins out, drop the trigger housing out, put the new one in, and put the pins back. Takes about two minutes if you count taking the stock off and putting it back on.

Some things you can do without spending much money that will improve functioning are to polish the working surfaces of the bolt to a mirror finish with 320, then 400, then 600 grit sandpaper. Replace the steel bolt stop pin with a GOOD bolt buffer (Yellow Jacket seem to be about the best), take the bolt lock/release out and grind off the point that projects down so that it leaves an arched surface at the top (check YouTube for videos on how to do this, there are a bunch of them), which will give you an automatic bolt release. Auto bolt releases are also sold, but it's so easy to modify the original that buying one would be a waste of money.

One other thing you can do is to drill a hole in the back of the receiver so that you can clean the barrel from the rear instead of the muzzle. Brownells sells a jig for doing this. I haven't done this to any of mine, but I'm thinking about it. When the action is in the stock, the hole would be covered up, so it doesn't affect the looks of the rifle when it's assembled.

When you're looking for a 10/22, in general, the old ones are better than the new ones. The new ones have a lot of plastic parts that were metal in the older versions. I don't know how familiar you are with 10/22's, but the real early ones just had a plain serial number without a prefix. These rifles were made from 1964 through 1969. In 1970, a prefix was added to the serial number, starting with 110 for the prefix. The 100 prefix numbers ran through 1988, with the last 100-series prefix being the 129 series. In 1989, the prefix number went to 200 series, the first 200 numbers being 230 series. The last 200 prefix was the 259 in 2007. The 300 prefix numbers started at 351 in 2008, and they're still making 300-series prefixes. In 2011, they were up to 357 for a prefix. By now, maybe 358, but the last one listed on the Ruger website is 357.

The early (1964-69) rifles are more or less collector's items now among Ruger fans, but the general public isn't quite as up on that, so sometimes you can get a good deal from a private party on an early 10/22. But since you're going to modify it anyway, see if you can find one of the 100-series prefix rifles. The usual sources, Gun shops, Pawn shops, Gun Shows, and Gun Broker are all good places to look. Most pawn shops have some 10/22's, since millions of them have been made since 1964. The 100-series guns would probably be the best for building what you're talking about, but the 200 and 300 aren't bad, they just have more plastic parts then the 100 series. The last couple of 10/22's that I bought cost $150 and $160, respectively, at one of the local gun shows. You also want to look for one that hasn't been modified. 10/22's are kind of like VW Bugs; there are a ton of aftermarket gadgets for them, and there are a lot of 10/22's that have been WECSOG'd to withing an inch of their life and may have a bunch of crap on them that you don't need or want. There are also a lot of them floating around that have had some ham-fisted moron work on them and screw things up, so look for one that's either stock or close to it. There are a lot of them out there.

As I said, look for a 100 series or 200 series serial number rifle when you're shopping, either in person or on line, and the closer to stock the better. And speaking of stocks, I have a Hogue stock on my match 10/22, and I really like it. One of my friends here in town also works for Tactical Solutions and is a Files member, so he'd probably be another good source to talk to. I'll send you a PM on that.

OK, this is starting to look like book instead of a post, and it's about time for lunch, so I'll go ahead and put this up.

phillyray
March 24, 2012, 15:28
nodak spud sells a receiver.

http://www.nodakspud.com/NDS-22.htm

LaConservationist
March 24, 2012, 18:41
Well guys I am NOT the best at being patient, I went and purchased the cheapest Ruger 10/22 I could find here locally! Most shops that I would do business with was actually out of stock, BUT one very reputable one did have a few! This one was with black synthetic stock and blued receiver and barrel....

I then picked up a labeled (SHOOTERS EDGE) brand 4-12X40 AO optics, lil guy there showed me one of his personal 10-22's and that is what he used and very happy with it......

I then went to another local shop that carried the Tac Sol 16 1/4" Threaded Fluted barrel, Tac Sol rail, leupold rings and Hogue stock, 25 round Ruger mag......brought it all home and 30 mins later walked out of my lil shop with this......

Sweet lil shooter, once I run a few hundred rounds I may have to get some trigger work done but its NOT horrible but could be better!

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-3wCXtlq528Q/T25WoI3DxpI/AAAAAAAAAG0/vRHFGE-osVQ/s512/photo%25204.JPG

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-L7rh6APxB-s/T25WkRJFCYI/AAAAAAAAAGc/Pehzr1XO_AI/s512/photo%25203.JPG

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-mNXst3dpwBM/T25WmxkLyVI/AAAAAAAAAGk/QaUc6FZ_ipk/s640/photo%25202.JPG

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-jc_pDFLHHHw/T25WnSq06GI/AAAAAAAAAGo/F0Kf0H4y0Kk/s640/photo%25201.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-nJKrKxyl1oM/T25avcS3PII/AAAAAAAAAHY/X8oPh7RI81k/s640/photo%25201-4.JPG

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-F6RgsA_10jw/T25arniP98I/AAAAAAAAAHI/X1BtJlc-eW4/s640/photo%25201-3.JPG

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-rVhn1Ul_e94/T25argjgnBI/AAAAAAAAAHE/m8z_vcjIlG8/s640/photo%25201-2.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-cPcyGJ5WxJM/T25arfdfMPI/AAAAAAAAAHA/SVsjUGswEBU/s640/photo%25201-1.JPG

LaConservationist
March 24, 2012, 19:02
catmguy445....WOW thanks for the "BOOK" thats a WEALTH of knowledge for damn sure and a post I will come back to very often!
Since this is my first 10-22 of this type I can ONLY expand and get better!
I guess you can tell from the pics I am a fan of the TAC-SOL products! Very pleased with the Pac-Lite for darn sure!

I wasn't really in the market for another 22 rifle but a friend of mine at work has been pushing me to take this plunge.....well I did!

I will play with this one and also anxious to stretch her out a lil more than just the 25-30 yrds in my back yard!

It is a very good feeling rifle and since I am not really exposed to competition style triggers, this one isn't bad at all for now......I will dive deeper in very soon!!

THANK YOU ALL for the help and sharing your knowledge and expertise!!

OH.....what about running a can on this particular rifle? Will a standard .22 can such as the 22/45 do ok on this rifle? Anything I need to know before screwing it on?

THANKS AGAIN!

LaC

LaConservationist
March 24, 2012, 19:35
Pricey but Volquartsen makes a 10/22 receiver. Mine will shoot MOA with good ammo. It has a 20" Green Mountain SS barrel. They go together pretty easy. Rimfire Sports & Custom is a nice place to go browsing.


https://www.volquartsen.com/products/887-replacement-receiver

http://www.rimfiresports.com/merchant.mv



Here is mine, it has a different scope now, but I don't have a recent picture.

http://i587.photobucket.com/albums/ss317/The_JaXXas/IMG_0202.jpg

JAXXAS, that is BADDAS!!!! :bow::bow:

catmguy445
March 24, 2012, 23:23
LaC,

Shouldn't be any problem using a can. Pretty much any can set up for .22LR will work on any gun that shoots .22LR ammo. How well it works depends on several factors, but most modern cans are pretty quiet on .22 rifles. With std. velocity or subsonic ammo, you'll probably hear the firing pin hit the primer when you fire.

Your new toy looks really slick, but be careful. Ruger 10/22's are almost as addictive as FAL's. Like I said, I've got seven of 'em. Two are oldies, made in '66, one is a plinker I bought new about 1978, one has a folding stock that I use as a camp gun, one is a future project gun that I already have a Green Mountain 18" fluted bbl. for, one is a Sporter model, and the other one is my match rifle. Three of them have either Volquartsen or Power Custom hammer/sear/spring kits in them. The match gun has a Timney trigger (GP has a long thread about the problems with the first version of Timney 10/22 triggers, but mine works fine. However, Timney has completely redesigned their 10/22 trigger which now comes as a complete trigger housing with the HST installed and preset by Timney), Shooter's Ridge 18" blue fluted steel .920" barrel with match chamber, modified bolt release, TacSol extractor, TacSol barrel V-block, polished bolt sides, bottom edges, and rear, along with polished hammer face, TacSol polyurethane bolt buffer, OD Green Hogue Stock, Weaver scope base, Warne rings, and a Nikon Prostaff 3-9 x 40 scope with BDC reticle mounted on it. With CCI Mini-Mag, it shoots just about MOA groups. Might shoot a little tighter groups with target ammo, but I'm using it at 100 yards on steel silhouette targets, so I'll trade a tiny bit of accuracy for velocity to get the bullet out there.

Even though you aren't planning on shooting any matches with yours, getting a better hammer/sear kit is still a good idea. The trigger will still be reliable, but will be much lighter than the stock trigger pull you have now. Both the Volquartsen and Power Custom have a little creep in them, but they're nice and smooth, with a pull weight of 3-5 pounds.

Before you go out and start burning a lot of ammo through it, one hint is to put a TINY drop of oil on the extractor spring and work it in good so that the extractor plunger is lubed and the extractor pivots smoothly. Also lightly lube the hammer face and hammer and trigger pivot pins. Might not hurt to put a very tiny smidge of grease (I use Super Lube) on the sear/hammer notch. Oh, yeah, one last thing. If you get a sear/hammer kit at some point and it comes with a replacement hammer spring, try using it with the factory spring first, before you put the lighter hammer spring in. It'll still be light and smooth, but will give you more reliable ignition with the factory spring.

So go out and have fun with it, which I'm sure you will, and let us know how it works. Once again, congrats on your new toy. :beer:

fnogger
March 29, 2012, 10:10
My build with a TS barrel wasn't accurate at all with just about any ammo - including Wolf, Ely black box, etc. But it would shoot dime sized groups at 50 yards with CCI Blazer.

Sold it to pay for a 22 conversion for the FAL....

LaConservationist
March 29, 2012, 17:27
My build with a TS barrel wasn't accurate at all with just about any ammo - including Wolf, Ely black box, etc. But it would shoot dime sized groups at 50 yards with CCI Blazer.

Sold it to pay for a 22 conversion for the FAL....

I was shooting about the same with CCI subsonics with mine just breaking in....IF you wanna call it that. Well ok maybe I am stretching it a bit, I guess it was more like quarter size jagged hole at 50 yrds.......BUT my rest wasn't very steady :rolleyes: Well so far I am very pleased with it, can't wait to screw the can on and see how that works out!!

Again THANK YOU all for the input on this thread!!

LaC

gunnut1
March 29, 2012, 17:30
The best thing I can say about the 10-22. It lends itself to be customized. I took a $150.00 rifle and turned it into a $600.00 rifle.