PDA

View Full Version : Beggers


Abominog
January 31, 2012, 21:15
We've all seen them. Not the ones rummaging for cans even, but the truly downtrodden who are sleeping on the sidewalk.

I've sometimes found myself giving them some change. And when I don't, I sometimes feel guilt for having passed a fellow human in need.

Yes, I know the stories. Some make good money at it. Some are drug addicts and turn the money into drugs- I saw that in San Fran.

Yet, I've walked the streets in Asia and seen young women sitting there with a sleeping child next to them. Yes, I do know that the children are sometimes rented in order to bolster income.

But still, I feel for the downtrodden. I now know that severe alcoholism and drug addiction is not a choice; one cannot wake up tomorrow and say, "I quit" it is NOT a choice, it as overpowering control that the individual cannot beat.

In Bangkok the people have a neat solution- don't give them money, give them food. It's not uncommon to see a homeless person sleeping on the sidewalk with a McDonald's bag next to them, as yet unopened. I did see a couple times in USA food given to a homeless person, and the homeless person opened the bag to see what was in it, then threw the whole thing away in disgust; they wanted cash. But in Asia it seems that the gift is welcomed and used.

Maybe it is a scam. But when I see a child sleeping on cardboard on an overpass in Bangkok, it pains me deeply. My baby is/ was that age, and no matter the situation, she doesn't sleep on cardboard with people passing by. Whether the child is destitute or the parents are poor enough to rent her out, the poor thing still has not much comfort or future. Particularly little girls, I just want to take them home, clean them up, and care for them forever.

I have little confidence in those "adopt a child" programs. I've seen how they squander money, force religious beliefs, and selectively care some over others.

I've seen the kids sent out to beg in an overbearing way, such as in Philippines. And I've seen those kids take the cash and buy a cigarette, or give it to dad who is a real POS. They may be poor, but they're not desitute, and they're abusing humanity to futher a financial position.

And, to establish my position- there are few "poor" in USA. Having not enough to eat, and sweatshirts instead of parkas, but big TVs and cars is not "poor." It's piss-poor parenting and family. I feel for the kids, but they're part of a system mom & dad continue to maintain. And, ultimately, aside from parental love and food, most of our inner city kids actually live more comfortably than the Amish.

But the truly destitute- particularly the children- really get to me. You know?

L1A1rocker
January 31, 2012, 21:35
I'm not sure about asia but I know for a fact about the begger's kids in the Mexican border towns. Most of them are rented. Yep, supposed beggers will rent the kids in the morning to boost their daily take.

VonFireball
January 31, 2012, 21:41
But still, I feel for the downtrodden.

I do as well. Some are not as fortunate to have had a good upbringing, guidance, and financial help. I usually refuse them money here, Austin doesn't allow panhandling so most of the people who approach you are very in your face about it although I sometimes help a sincere soul.

When I stayed in Nashville shortly after Katrina there was a real need for money and other necessities. There were so many people who were there and were actually looking for work, working day labor, and begging to get by. It was awful and probably a snippet of what the future of every major city will look like soon.

I used to put blankets, socks, toothpaste, underwear, and other basics in my trunk in case I came across someone who needed them. I would occasionally toss a five or ten at someone who I deemed needy enough. I don't care if they buy booze or smokes or drugs, that is their prerogative, not mine. Food or booze, at least they are comforted for a time. What's a few dollars? Not much. Heck sometimes I would just give them a doggone beer....

A lot of people are out there for all sort of reasons; kicked out by family for mental illness or a drinking/drug problem they can't kick. Some people told me they just didn't want to stay in the shelter because so many nut jobs stayed there or they had to be in by 9 or 10 or couldn't sleep there intoxicated. Most of them also have a "no weapons" policy, great if you find yourself on the streets as an easy target.

All things aside, some of the most honest people I have ever met were homeless. What do they have to gain by hiding things? I used to know a guy who'd carry my guitar case five or six blocks from the parking lot to the jam for a few bucks. That was after he sold me a parking pass someone else discarded for five bucks (it cost seven so it was a deal). You can get a lot of night life and safety tips from the homeless folks, as their ear is always to the street so to speak.

Thanks for posting Abo.

STGThndr
January 31, 2012, 21:52
God bless your kind heart! "I was hungry and you fed me, sick and you visited me,.." words we all shall hear, to our joy or doom... I give when I can but not enough, the need is great right now.

Jaxxas
January 31, 2012, 22:19
I hear ya!

I generally ignore most of them, they usually don't press the issue.

Had a dude begging bus change from me once in a Home Depot parking lot while I was loading a dozen or so bags of Ready Mix. Told him, sure if he wanted to help load up my truck! He waffled saying he had a "job interview" down town and couldn't get dirty! I couldn't help him.

Had another fairly big black dude trying to stare me down at Lowe's. I think he thought he could intimidate me into offering him money, so I got out of my car and looked down at him. He went away.

Had a young (very young, 15-16?) girl with a very young baby begging change at a Best Buy, I would have probably given her my 401k to take her and her kid home to feed them, but I had zero dollars in my wallet. They were gone when I came out. Probably a scam.

There is a guy who has hung around about the workplace for the last 10-20 years. He always seems busy collecting cans, sometimes selling big rocks(??) by the side of the road. He has a bicycle with a trailer, usually full of cans. I've stopped and given him jackets and canned food. Bought some rocks off him! Bought him lunch at the local Subway once, boy did he smell, cleared the lunch line out! Caught him a couple times near my Xmas bonus, and spread the cheer. At least he seems to be trying. Bought another drunk lunch a couple of three times at a local Mexican restaurant, it's across the street from a liquor store. Pretty sure he wanted cash, but he ate up the Mexican food fast enough.

ram
January 31, 2012, 22:21
When I lived in Asia, we would give food to the beggars who came to our door. When we met a beggar in the street, we'd give a very small amount of money. The professional beggars would throw it down and demand "real" money. Truly poor people would say thank you and start to move on. Then we'd give them some more.

VonFireball
January 31, 2012, 22:28
God bless your kind heart! "I was hungry and you fed me, sick and you visited me,.." words we all shall hear, to our joy or doom... I give when I can but not enough, the need is great right now.

Please don't accuse me of being kind! I am a disgrace to kindness. The need is always great. Like you, I feel I never give enough and worse, I have turned more than some away. Really, if a man gave everything he had it would amount to very little, as when a person reflects on it they realize their life is more than a dollar amount.

I had a co-worker say "I hate bums" one day. Damn if I didn't tear into him for that remark. As if their life wasn't harsh enough without the hate from those who have more. I have noticed this is a prevalent attitude amongst many.

Nowadays I stay in a more rural area where there are no beggars save for the times I gig and jam in Austin. Still, my main job now is one where I can set a poor person back weeks or months if I run things completely by the rule book, so I try to make exceptions for them while running a tight ship with well to do folk. It's never the poor who become angry when I inform them that they will be needing to spend money meeting standards but rather the rich tightwads who get angry when I tell them they will have to spend money to get what they seek.

Mark IV
February 01, 2012, 00:54
I know here in Detroit, the panhandlers are just plain lazy. Nothing physically or mentally wrong with them; they just plain don't want to work.

Used to be when one of them asked me for money, I told them no, but I'd buy them something to eat.

Nowadays, when they ask me for money, I say to them, "why aren't you working?" They can't walk away fast enough.

I know my Bible well. Paul wrote to Timothy "He who will not work, let him not eat." The Lord hates slackness.

Of course I'd not turn away a mother with a starving child, but I won't subsidize laziness.

And another thing. I don't know what it's like outside of the States, but in Detroit, if you give one person money, you are immediately thronged by other panhandlers with their hands out. Bad idea.

Retired Bum
February 01, 2012, 03:04
I live just a couple of miles from what used to be called "The Crossroads of America". It was the intersection of US 40 and US 41. Now it the intersection of I-70 and US 41. I see the same panhandlers with their cardboard signs at the same locations for a month or longer at times. These people park their vehicles in some hotel or shopping mall lot and then go stand there with their grubby mitts out wanting your money.

I refuse to give them money or anything else. Maybe all those years I spent working as a C.O. for the Federal Bureau of Prisons made me callous and suspicious. I learned to keep my distance from the convicts when they would try to tell me their tales of woe. Now I do the same thing with the panhandlers and beggars.

Back when the old Soviet Union was in business there was a law against what they called "parasites". These people would be snatched up and sent to the gulag for "re-education" and to do hard labor. Sometimes I think that the commies had it right when it comes to dealing with these kinds of people.

There has always been the homeless in this country starting with all the convicts that the British would send to the "penal colonies" of the New World. Those poor bastards didn't have a choice. But now the problem with the homeless is squarely on the shoulders of the libtards who think that they know best. I can remember when the SCOTUS ruled that is was illegal to keep the homeless and mentally incompetent in "county poor houses" and mental institutions. As a result thousands upon thousands of these people were turned loose on society with no where to go and no one prepared to look after them. Those days of "three hots and a cot" were over. I was a young correctional officer working for the state back then. It took almost no time at all for the evicted types to start showing up in prisons because they knew that in prison they would have a roof over their heads and get three meals a day. The inmate population of the State Penal Farm I worked at almost doubled because of the libtard's good intentions.

Okay, enough of this mini rant of mine.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

martin35
February 01, 2012, 05:51
I flew into Manila to have a meeting with some engineers of the Philippine oil and gas monopoly, arriving in the middle of the night and taking the Hotel limo South to Cavite City I passed a one legged beggar in the median of the avenue, he was positioned next to a stop sign, he came on his crutch to my passenger window and made a gesture of begging,,, it was both our tough luck that I did not have a single bill or coin of currency,,, only a bunch of credit cards.
Mine was probably the most opulent conveyance he would see that day,,, he was all smiles until he comprehend my gesture of being without ready funds,, the smile disappeared and a look of malevolence like I had never seen came on his face.
He was about the age of to have been part of the liberation guerrillas who helped free his country and most likely he lost his leg in WWII, based on that assumption I would have made a contribution to him were I able to.
Of all the beggar's I have seen around the world his face is the most memorable,,, no other human ever looked at me with such hatred,,,, except my first wife,,, I was even more useless to her.
I'm pretty sure both still harbor ill will against me,,, assuming they are alive today.
Most of the time you can't fix the world and that can make you a spectator to suffering.

skeeterbay
February 01, 2012, 08:57
I don't like to pass by people in need and usually I don't if it looks to be genuine.

When I was a young kid we had a family that lived behind a hay field from us. The husband had lost both hands/lower arms in a buzz saw rig. Every time they saw me start out with my rifle one of them would ask me to bring something back for them. They were not fussy about their meal. Often during the summer they wanted me to bring them back wood chucks to eat.

thedrickel
February 01, 2012, 12:41
Having lived in SF and Oakland for most of my life I'm really jaded when it comes to street people/bums/beggars. I don't give them shit. They don't want food, they just want money so they can buy drugs or alcohol. In touristy areas you have professional bums that make a good living, but of course I don't give them anything either. We have been getting a rash of young (mostly white) punk types begging on the street, so my voice has been getting a good workout b/w "Get a ******* job or go back to your parents in Portland" and "Money? You could at least suck my cock for 10 bucks, honey."

Hot Diggity
February 01, 2012, 13:21
Best example of this I ever saw was at a busy off ramp on I95. Guy sat on a bucket next to the road surrounded by discarded water bottles. (that thoughtful folks had given him) His cardboard sign said something about "Will work for food" or something equally original.

I must've come by when his shift was over. I saw him take a few more dollars from a motorist ahead of me, wrap them tightly around a bundle of other bills the diameter of a softball, and wrap a rubber band around them all. (If it was all $1 bills it had to be near $500) He then picked up his bucket and sign and headed off down the on ramp. If I hadn't had family with me I'd have pulled over and tailed him to see where he went.

I won't mention the state this was in, but it was a rural area. I wonder if he was the first generation of his family to work this off-ramp.

I never give beggars a dime. If I say anything at all it's "No."

HD

Jaxxas
February 01, 2012, 22:10
I had a weird incident in Rome with 'beggars' once back in 97. Actually I had heard about the problem previously and avoided it quite successfully but it happened none the less. I had spent almost 3 months in Papua New Guinea sitting a drill rig while conducting stress measurements. I was flying on an around the world airline ticket after I left Indonesia. I spent 2 days in Seoul, 3 days in Singapore, two days in Zurich, four days in Rome, 7 days in Ohio (visiting Mom!), and then back to Arizona.

So here I was in Rome wandering those ancient streets in total awe. (Again travel guides warn you of the kid pickpocket mobs!) When somehow on a busy Roman street this band of 'kids' recognized me as a tourist. I was mobbed by at least a dozen young kids, with a central 'teen'(?) female exposing her out-sized bosom for me to ogle. I was just out of a near 3 month stint in a rain forest with nothing but aboriginals to observe, so ogle I did! They all press close against you in a rapid frantic motion so you don't really understand what's happening. At what had to be the last moment I realized this was what the tourist guides had warned (though in my male defense they never mentioned big boobs!) me about and I reached into my pockets, only to find the hands of an 8-10 year old pick pocket already in my pockets! I barely escaped with my my Credit card and drivers license. That was all I had in my pockets thanks to the previously mentioned warnings. The hotels there like to hold your passport, so it wasn't at risk. Was worried about it up front, but in retrospect it seems a good idea! YMMV!

Sgt_Gold
February 02, 2012, 01:57
Having lived in SF and Oakland for most of my life I'm really jaded when it comes to street people/bums/beggars. I don't give them shit. They don't want food, they just want money so they can buy drugs or alcohol. In touristy areas you have professional bums that make a good living, but of course I don't give them anything either. We have been getting a rash of young (mostly white) punk types begging on the street, so my voice has been getting a good workout b/w "Get a ******* job or go back to your parents in Portland" and "Money? You could at least suck my cock for 10 bucks, honey."

I was in SF about 10 years ago and a bum came up to me, shoved a laminated 'license' in my face and demanded money. I told him 'get the **** away from me'. While he was wandering off one of the locals told me that he was a licensed panhandler, and he was legally allowed to beg for money. I responded 'that may be the case, but I'm not legally required to give him any.' I think 50% of the people were giving me the stink eye, and the other 50% were having an epiphany.

oddcarl
February 02, 2012, 03:12
I have always tried to only give food and water. My Sunday-school teacher explained to me when I was young as to why, and it all made sense. I do feel bad though when I drive by and don't have any food to give them, or any money to go get them food. However, there seems to be a lot of people I hear about who are not in need, and beg, or even steal from the people that are. THAT makes me sick.

evan price
February 02, 2012, 05:15
Back when I worked at the tire shop which was located right at a busy intersection and backed up onto a major freeway on ramp there was this guy we saw out there all the time. He had the look right except for the shoes.

-they never remember to wear really lousy shoes, because standing around for hours in crap shoes HURTS. You can always tell if they have good shoes, they are fakes-

He used to park his fairly new Pontiac in our parking lot and then spend 2-3 hours around lunch time begging with a cardboard sign. Sometimes he made two tours, one at lunch and one at rush hour. Sometimes he brought his dog along to sit by him and look thirsty.

We had words with him a few times, he frankly admitted he made more money begging than he did with a day job. He finally went away after he realized where the roofing nails he kept getting in his tires came from.

I had this big 6'6" 300-pound black dude come out from behind a fence where I was parking my car to go to a restaurant in Cincinnati with my fiance who just loomed in front of me and demanded spare change. He got a look down the business end of a Sig P220 and decided that he better move the hell on.

I can't stand those fukking lazy bastards, and perhaps the do-goody whiny guilt-trip yuppies that enable them are almost as bad.

I'm not going to let someone starve, or freeze, people who are really down on their luck I help out, but the times I offered lunch or employment to these parasites I got a curse or a middle finger in return.

OSU campus in the late 90's I had a guy come at me wanting money for "gas to get home, even a couple bucks". I asked him if he had change for a $20. He said "Sure," and started pulling out money...then he realized he'd been had and walked away cussing me out.

I used to get these guys at the gas station, too, wanting me to pump a couple bucks in their tank when I filled up the company truck. It got so bad in some urban areas that I took to keeping a hammer handle in my back pocket and thumping the tires very obviously when I saw them looking me over. You didn't dare leave the doors unlocked or they would open the back of the truck and start trying to steal tools and stuff.

There used to be a lot of dudes who would park near a gas station and claim they ran out of gas right there and needed a couple bucks to get home, or to a job interview, or pick kids up at the hospital, or whatever excuse they think you might buy.

When I drove a wrecker we had these freeway emergency trucks that were sponsored by a radio station and they would drive around the interstate ring and help motorists that ran out of gas or needed a flat changed or a jump start or whatever. They carried 1-gallon gas cans and they would help you out by giving you a gallon of gas to get you off the interstate to the next exit to a gas station. It was supposed to be a public service to keep the highway clear for traffic and get the radio station's name out there. They tied it into their traffic reporting. We put a big graphic on the trucks with the radio station logo and lots of flashing lights. The help they gave out was free of charge to the person who was broke down.

There were always these frequent-flyers that never had gas in their car, they would drive on the free gallon and when it ran out they'd stop and wait for another free gallon. If the service drivers got on to them they'd have a girlfriend or babydaddy or relative be the one to ask for the free gas.

After a while the drivers would start a list on the clipboard of license numbers and make/models and descriptions. That was the Freeloader List. If you were on the list you didn't get any free gas. Then the parasites would bitch and whine about racism and discrimination or whatever they could holler about to get their free gas. Then they would call the radio station and accuse the drivers of anything they could think of that was nasty. These people were really, really good at complaining.

Eventually the radio station stopped sponsoring the service and it got discontinued.

ratas calientes
February 02, 2012, 10:30
In the LDS church we have a welfare program to aid our own. First rule . . . . we never give people money. Pay some of their bills, yes. Cash, never. Food, always. Money, never. Help them find a job, of course. It is better for people to learn to be self reliant. Tough problem, no doubt. And after dealing with some of these folks, including transient members, I have many stories I could tell.

skeeterbay
February 02, 2012, 17:10
I run into LDS young fellers from time to time. They do a lot of missionary type work up in my area. From what I can tell they spend a lot of time going around asking people if they need a hand. I have seen them doing everything from lugging shopping bags for people to roofing a building for an elderly couple. I even had two young men give me a hand lugging some furniture for and an elderly couple.

The young LDS men that come around these parts make very good ambassadors for your church. They are always polite, well mannered and helpful. They are fine young men and I would give any one of them help if they found themselves needing it.




In the LDS church we have a welfare program to aid our own. First rule . . . . we never give people money. Pay some of their bills, yes. Cash, never. Food, always. Money, never. Help them find a job, of course. It is better for people to learn to be self reliant. Tough problem, no doubt. And after dealing with some of these folks, including transient members, I have many stories I could tell.

W.E.G.
February 02, 2012, 17:36
http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/Beggar_Banquet.jpg

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/t64Sn10D0bo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Lets drink to the hard working people
Lets drink to the lowly of birth
Raise your glass to the good and the evil
Lets drink to the salt of the earth

Say a prayer for the common foot soldier
Spare a thought for his back breaking work
Say a prayer for his wife and his children
Who burn the fires and who still till the earth

And when I search a faceless crowd
A swirling mass of gray and
Black and white
They don't look real to me
In fact, they look so strange

Raise your glass to the hard working people
Lets drink to the uncounted heads
Lets think of the wavering millions
Who need leaders but get gamblers instead

Spare a thought for the stay-at-home voter
His empty eyes gaze at strange beauty shows
And a parade of the gray suited grafters
A choice of cancer or polio

And when I look in the faceless crowd
A swirling mass of grays and
Black and white
They don't look real to me
Or don't they look so strange

Lets drink to the hard working people
Lets think of the lowly of birth
Spare a thought for the rag taggy people
Lets drink to the salt of the earth

Lets drink to the hard working people
Lets drink to the salt of the earth
Lets drink to the two thousand million
Lets think of the humble of birth

Steve in SC
February 02, 2012, 22:54
I don't mind helping those in need, but that should be my choice on where, when and how much.

Something I have noticed around here of late are people approaching while pumping gas. Most folks are not paying attention to their surroundings and make an easy robbery target. Be careful, not everyone is "poor" and in need of help.

JohnnyMac
February 03, 2012, 20:24
God bless your kind heart! "I was hungry and you fed me, sick and you visited me,.." words we all shall hear, to our joy or doom... I give when I can but not enough, the need is great right now.

Yes, we must remember that we may be "entertaining angels unaware" (Hebrews 13:2).

That said, I try to give a hand-up rather than a hand-out. I used to give out cards from a local ministry that helps the homeless back on their feet. Taped to the back of the card were two quarters to make a phone call to the ministry hot-line (remember pay phones?). Now, even the homeless apparently have cell phones, so I switched to giving out the ministry's cards taped to McDonald's gift certificates, then to $5 McDonald's gift cards. I only give to a pan-handler ONCE. The ball is in their hands, after that.

JMc

P.S. I also help pay for the supplies (bacon, eggs, and grits) and cook breakfast for the homeless once a month at a feeding program in DC. In the past, I have provided water and Gatorade to the homeless during heat waves, and hot cocoa to them during cold snaps.

Hebrew Battle Rifle
February 05, 2012, 14:10
I follow the example given by Jesus in the story of the Samaritan.The Samaritan attended to the victims obvious NEEDS. He took him to an INN and gave money to the Innkeeper for the victims care. He did NOT give the money to the victim, nor did he tend to the victims wants.

I will give freely and enthusiastically to someone in obvious NEED (Food, water, clothing, first aid), but I never give money and the need had better be pretty obvious. If they have to TELL me about the need, then it isn't obvious.
In regard to water, that one is a no brainer. Everybody needs water every day. Clothing: again, if they are naked or freezing from lack of covering, it is pretty obvious. Food: Well, that one is a little more difficult to define, but I haven't ever gone wrong giving a soul a free meal. But if you have a muffin top sister, eat that before begging from me!

gates
February 05, 2012, 15:58
I have paid for meals and occasionally handed my lunch out of my car window to a "corner" guy - only time I have given more than a few dollars was in a restaurant - it was winter, a kid was obviously trying to get warm and the manager walked up to his table and told him he had to leave in a nasty tone - only paying customers could be here, the kid meekly pulled a rumpled five out of his pocket - I watched this happening and it pissed me off so I asked my wife to excuse me, and I walked over and slapped a $20 on the table, in front of the manager, and told the kid to buy whatever he wanted as I looked the manager in the eye... people can be pricks.

randy762ak
February 05, 2012, 19:28
When I was working In Charlotte NC I would come to an intersection there was an I-HOP restaurant That always had a help wanted sign in the window.
This place seemed to have this one beggar who set up shop on a nice grassy spot where people could stop and give him money He had the Jesus Love you Need Food Hungry cardboard sign! One day I rolled down the window and shouted over that I-Hop was hiring --I will clean up his response-I aint working at that f-8&^%&&^ing place !
Thats all I needed to know about USA beggars,,, Now when I was In china I would give a little money to The old Ladys who looked like they needed food and a doctor!

MK ULTRA
February 05, 2012, 23:48
Tell them to get out and vote against Obombo.

We need him out and we need the economy up and running again.

I know the choices on the republican side don't look that good but any of them will be better than what we have.

Just sayin.

FAL freek
February 06, 2012, 08:12
Have an uncle that did some studies for the city of Chicago during the 1970s on their homeless population. One guy in particular was singled out as he did it for years. Come to find out the bum made $60 K a year (in the 70s) and went to Florida during the winter. Come spring he came back home to Chicago and did it again. Been mobbed by the local wildlife in Pre Katrina New Orleans that needs just enough money to take a shower and then moves on to the next tourist. Strange that the one time I went to NO after Katrina that situation didn't happen again. Locally had 3 youths in their early 20s all peering under the hood of a car at a gas station. I knew what was fixing to happen, one approaches me telling me a hard luck story about an oil seal leak and it's their first day on the job so they don't have any money etc. I walk into the store and buy 2 quarts of the cheapest oil they had and watched them pour it into the car. Sure enough they asked for money for gas after that. They figured out real quick to stop asking me for money after they got the oil. I chuckled driving away thinking they were too dumb to realize you run the chance of blowing a seal if you put too much oil in an engine. But the one that probably made me the most sick was Austin TX where there are pan handlers on many street corners all holding up their hard luck signs and everyone of them have tan lines from doing it day after day. I do try to remember there are some that are truly in need and not let the freeloaders discourage that.

gunplumber
February 06, 2012, 10:04
What a great country we live in when the main health problem of our "poor" is obesity.

I don't give anything to any panhandler regardless of the story of the day. Seen too many professionals working for "Homeless Incorporated".

I give to individuals and my church.

The signs at Yosemite say "Don't feed the animals, as they will lose the ability to feed themselves".

Don't know 'bout other countries, but I am a sucker for throwing kids candy.

Cava3r4
February 08, 2012, 15:42
IN Scottsdale, on Mayo Blvd and Scottsdale Road North their is a stoplight.
They always sit at the base of the stoplight where you are waiting for the left turn signal (you are heading east on Mayo and are going to turn left...NORTH on Scottsdale rd).
If you look behind or alongside of the shopping center markee (on the Northwest corner of the intersection) you will see his $2000 bycycle parked there! Sometimes, his reliever is there (during the hot summer months) they switch about every 15 minutes.
The ones that really piss me off are the "Vietnam Vet" types. I AM a REAL vietnam vet from 1968. Some of these chitbirds have the "nam vet" sign and are what... 45 years old!! I kind of doubt it.

The good story is years ago I talked it over with my wife and we gave a "homeless guy" $500. He had a BS story for me as to why he didn't get a place to live and his brother took the money. BTW.... I gave him the money in his MINISTERS church office thinking the Minister was going to help "guide him".
So he calls me up (the homeless guy) and he's broke, on the street, his "brother' threw him out and it is WINTER in MN!! I told him I'd give him a ride to a place called "make old things new". MOTN is a place run by an excon who buys houses in need of repair and teaches homeless people how to do sheetrock, plumbing, electrical, etc so they can MAKE a LIVING!! They LIVE in the house while fixing it up for sale, which then bankrolls the next house. He went there but ended up getting his NOSE stuck in a bottle!! the liqour store was a quarter mile away.
So, he offered him a ride to either the liquor store or a rehab center. He took the ride to rehab. to make a long story short he ended up going to team challenge and COMPLETED their course. Last I knew, he was "dry" and working for them and that was 6 years ago.

catmguy445
February 08, 2012, 19:10
Cava3r4, I'm also a Viet Nam Vet, 2 deployments between '66 and '68, and it pisses me off too. There are RVN Vets that had problems adapting to the world again when they got back, and some guys that developed mental or emotional problems, but in general, most of the other VN Vets that I've met since I was separated in '69 didn't have too much trouble going back to civilian life and getting a career started.

So these jerks with a "Viet Nam Vet" signs really annoy me. When I've been accosted by one of them, I ask them what unit they were with, and where they were in country, and they always either can't answer that, or try to make up something which is always wrong. That usually shuts them up and they go away. And, yeah, none of them seem to know when the Viet Nam war WAS, because they're too young to have been there.

Tuscan Raider
February 08, 2012, 21:11
After handing out food or a newspaper and getting disgusted looks I
pretty much don't give hand outs on the street anymore. Rotated food
goes to the foodbank, and a couple local charities see our monies.

I see alot of the same faces, and it seems to be in spurts. Will see one
guy for a week, and won't see him until the end of the month.

Pattern?

Not to derail the thread, but I love seeing people on welfare who can't
"work," but can walk around town all day or stand on a street corner.
Lots of times they have a better car too.

My personal opinion is that if you can stand all day
in the cold on a corner begging, you can work.
My Sunday paper is FULL of jobs. 20+ every week.

martin35
February 09, 2012, 05:55
Burma is one of the poorest countries in the world, each day at meal time the streets of Rangoon team with Saffron robed Buddhist monks carrying begging bowls,, it is a religious custom several millenniums old, receiving a gift of rice and giving a gift of rice is thought to be part of a blessing process that can impart well being and serenity to both participants of the process.
The gleaming temple spires of Rangoon where the monks spend their days in contemplation are said to be clad with gold, I never visited one being a Platinum American Express believer myself but since they were first built in the middle ages several conquering armies have passed through Rangoon and I am left to wonder how all that gold is still left sitting on those spires?
Kipling said they were clad with more gold than was held in all of London's banks.
I like the saffron robe idea for beggars,,, you can see them ftom a mile away.

lew
February 09, 2012, 08:07
IN Scottsdale, on Mayo Blvd and Scottsdale Road North their is a stoplight.
They always sit at the base of the stoplight where you are waiting for the left turn signal (you are heading east on Mayo and are going to turn left...NORTH on Scottsdale rd).
If you look behind or alongside of the shopping center markee (on the Northwest corner of the intersection) you will see his $2000 bycycle parked there! Sometimes, his reliever is there (during the hot summer months) they switch about every 15 minutes.

I remember seeing that circus last time I visited my half brother out there. They make the pros in Detroit look downright amateurish. Thought about ganking the bike. :devil::biggrin:

One thing I will never, ever do is give money to someone on the street. Plenty of charity programs around that are more than willing to help out if they are really in need. 'Sides, I've been through some hard times without resorting to begging. There's little reason they can't pull their shit together.

Sincerely,

-Heartless Bastard

StG58Freak
February 09, 2012, 08:46
America has the wealthiest poor people in the world.

In Akron OH the panhandlers have to purchase a license to beg, seriously. I bought a guy and his dog some dollar cheeseburgers the other day and he gave them back saying he didn't eat junk. I told him to give them to his dog and he laughed and said my dog doesn't eat that crap.

I heard from a good source that two brothers i went to school with made over $100,000 each begging and they both had nice homes and good jobs.

gunplumber
February 09, 2012, 10:08
I have a scar - when asked about it, I say "got it in the Nam" and people either nod knowingly (90%) or laugh 'cause they know I'm full of it (10%). Same with my friend Chris. "Oh, we were buddies in the Nam".

I was born in '69. Saigon fell when? '73? So pretty much the minimum age to have been in country was 18 years old in '73, or born '55. Which makes them 57. And more likely ' a few years older than that.

So when I see one of the "vet" signs, I Just ask if they learned to be a worthless loser in the military or if they'd always been a worthless loser.

chet
February 09, 2012, 11:10
My church takes a pretty solid stance on making sure we are a direct aid to those in need. As posted above, it is pretty simple to handle needs directly and use reasonable discernment. Almost every utility co. out there will make third party payments excessively simple to do. A bag of groceries. A rent check. Whatever.

Cash? No.

For me, the eye opener was seeing how many people contacted our church on a regular or semi-regular basis seemingly out of the blue - folks that do not live in the area and do not attend or know anyone who attends our church. I think some of them just run through the phone book asking pastors to meet them somewhere and give them money. Our pastor used to have a NEXTEL and he would get HUNDREDS of random 2way calls from unknown numbers asking for cash. How did they get his 2way number? Who knows? Thankfully, our leadership uses reasonable discernment in these matters.

A couple years ago, we got a heads up phone call from another local pastor that advised we would be getting a visit and a request from an individual who was obviously a pro and running a circuit. He described him and his story to a "T". Sure enough, a month later, the guy showed up at our Sunday morning service, as advertised with zoot suit, hat, cane, and story of being new in the area with XXXXX emergency need. The pastor simply asked if the help he had already received from our neighboring churches had been useful. The guy turned on his heel and left. On to the next hook in the trot line, I guess.

shortround
February 09, 2012, 12:52
I know here in Detroit, the panhandlers are just plain lazy. Nothing physically or mentally wrong with them; they just plain don't want to work.

Used to be when one of them asked me for money, I told them no, but I'd buy them something to eat.

Nowadays, when they ask me for money, I say to them, "why aren't you working?" They can't walk away fast enough.

I know my Bible well. Paul wrote to Timothy "He who will not work, let him not eat." The Lord hates slackness.

Of course I'd not turn away a mother with a starving child, but I won't subsidize laziness.

And another thing. I don't know what it's like outside of the States, but in Detroit, if you give one person money, you are immediately thronged by other panhandlers with their hands out. Bad idea.

Isn't that the truth. I drive through Detroit everyday to get to my current contract customer. Right where I get off of I-75 to drive down the famous 8 Mile there is always at least 1 panhandler waiting at the stop sign. I've seen more than 1 accident or near accident because of them. They are a tag team bunch too. They are there 24/7.

I try to be aware enough to help people I encounter in need. I've had a couple of times where I was standing in line at the grocery store and a young mother didn't have enough to pay her bill, so I did rather than her put food back. But I won't do that if she's trying to decide between spaghetios and a 12 pack.

My church gets most of my charitable giving. I try to give 10%, but don't always make it. I know the money going to them goes to good causes. In Detroit, the Detroit Rescue Mission is good to go. I know some of the people that run it, and I know in return for a meal and a bed they require some help and for the men to sit through a church service. A small price to pay if time is all you have.