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V guy
November 12, 2010, 16:26
I never paid any attention to the local broad who had Avon style purse parties at her home.

Apparently she was part of the mob and sold knockoffs of major Brand Labels, for years. Boots, purses, clothing, etc etc. High end stuff.

I really paid attention when she got arrested recently and they took away her husbands collector car--a '70 Z-28 Camaro. Great car!!

He'll be looking for a replacement not purchased with tainted funds, someday after he or just she, gets out. He was a phone company employee.
http://www.wktv.com/news/local/Utica-Police-arrest-three-people-allegedly-involved-in-a-counterfeit-merchandise-ring-106658588.html

They always kind of lived a bit beyond their means. They had some kids that same age as my grandson who I raised from age 6 on, so I had some contact with them. I actually went to a little league victory party at their home a few years back.

When they come to confiscate your items for forfeiture, everything goes. You have to prove it was not purchased with crime proceeds.

I guess this stuff is rampant. Probably a lot of it where you live.
I don't know if someone ratted them out or the authorites had been tracking the stuff. Guys don't normally come into contact with this merchandise.
Ask your wife!! You might be surprised!!

L Haney
November 12, 2010, 16:34
Originally posted by V guy


When they come to confiscate your items for forfeiture, everything goes. You have to prove it was not purchased with crime proceeds.

Yep. Ain't it great how property can now be guilty of a crime and have to be incarcerated? Guy I grew up with was growing a few pot plants, they confiscated all his dads farm equipment and sold it at a county auction. All the plants were hand tended, all 8 of them. The tractor, end loader, and hay balers were found guilty and sold into indentured servitude. They wanted to confiscate the barn, half a mile from the plants, but it was deemed a permanent fixture.

Andy the Aussie
November 12, 2010, 17:22
Similar laws exist here but in the case of the guy you grew up with Haney they would never have been able to seize all that few a few dope plants, in fact they would not even consider it. What needs to be shown here is that the property/item its self is actually "tainted" and not just a possession. For example the unemployed 22 year old who has two Harleys he bought new and a BMW convertible also that he bought new, who has not had regular employment or inheritance and cannot show a legitimate source for the money....AND who has been charged and convicted of a significant SUPPLY drug offense (not just possession of) will likely loose the property (Harleys and Beemer). But say he was living in a house he inherited from his mother no matter how nice it is, the house will remain his.

Andy :beer:

FAL freek
November 12, 2010, 18:18
Never ceases to amaze me, someone slaps their name or a fancy logo on something then charges outrageous prices for something that will be in style for all of a year or two and folks line up by the dozen to buy it. Think this country has far more pressing problems than to worry about allocating resources to prosecute this. Guess it's a slam dunk conviction for the prosecution so easy money for a cash strapped state.

alant
November 12, 2010, 18:46
Originally posted by V guy
I never paid any attention to the local broad who had Avon style purse parties at her home.
Um, no, I'm not into purses. How about you?

L Haney
November 12, 2010, 19:18
Andy, the law here was intended to keep the criminals from keeping profits from their illegal activities. It got off track. And became a funding mechanism for local law enforcement with the cooperation of local judges. It is abused by the state, and almost impossible for the average Joe to contest. In local terms, this is one of the most egregious violations of state power you'll find around here. And the courts are consolidating their power. Scary stuff going on.

starbuck
November 13, 2010, 06:27
generally your ok as long as you pay the IRS.


http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p525.pdf

From IRS Publication 525: Taxable and Nontaxable Income

Page 33:
"Illegal activities. Income from illegal activities, such as money from dealing illegal drugs, must be included in your income on form 1040 line 21, or on schedule C-EZ (Form 1040) if from your self employment activity."
Page 34:
"Kickbacks. You must include kickbacks,side commissions, push money, or similar payments you receive in your income..."
Page 35:
"Stolen property. If you steal property, you must report its fair market value in your income in the year you steal it unless in the same year, you return it to its rightful owner"

JasonB
November 13, 2010, 06:35
Originally posted by L Haney
It got off track.

You sure about that? Can't think of any train where you see all the scenery while you are buying the ticket.


An oldie, but a goodie:



http://www.saveourguns.com/scott001.htm

http://www.fear.org/scott.html

shlomo
November 13, 2010, 10:01
Originally posted by starbuck
generally your ok as long as you pay the IRS.


http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p525.pdf

From IRS Publication 525: Taxable and Nontaxable Income

Page 33:
"Illegal activities. Income from illegal activities, such as money from dealing illegal drugs, must be included in your income on form 1040 line 21, or on schedule C-EZ (Form 1040) if from your self employment activity."
Page 34:
"Kickbacks. You must include kickbacks,side commissions, push money, or similar payments you receive in your income..."
Page 35:
"Stolen property. If you steal property, you must report its fair market value in your income in the year you steal it unless in the same year, you return it to its rightful owner"

I thought this was a funny spoof. :rofl:

Then I looked it up and found out it ain't a spoof, which is even funnier.
:rofl: :rofl:

parisofthewest
November 13, 2010, 13:22
I'm risking getting my Man Card revoked over this, but I dated a broad who was into purses and it seems that with those ugly ass Coach purses if they are fake, the seams will not line up. On the real one, where one panel meets another, the "C" print for Coach will overlap properly like well installed wallpaper.

Ever since then I like seeing who's a cheap bitch who is trying too hard. I have only noticed maybe like 2 or 3 real ones.

parisofthewest

bnz42
November 13, 2010, 13:54
Wow, you guys should try shopping on Canal Street!:biggrin:

Brett
November 13, 2010, 14:37
If you owe the max on everything the government won't take any of it.

Eric Bryant
November 13, 2010, 14:44
Us guys have to watch out, too - there are a lot of counterfeit sporting goods and car parts on the market. Haven't yet heard of anyone actually getting busted for selling fake stuff, though.

Munster30
November 13, 2010, 18:11
Sounds to me like it should be a civil matter. Since when did producing and selling knock off purses and phony Rolex's have anything to do with public safety? As an aside, my daughter bough a phony Rolex on the streets of New York back when she was in High School. She's now in her 30's and that $20 "Rolex" still works.

Retired Bum
November 13, 2010, 19:08
Back in 1973 I went to work for the Federal Bureau of Prisons at a medium security prison. I noticed that most of the inmates were wearing Ocean Pacific sports clothing on the yard. I knew that OP was expensive and wondered how the inmates came by it. It turned out that all of the OP stuff in the prison was counterfeit and had been seized by the Customs Bureau. Rather than destroy the clothing, it was turned over to the BOP and issued to the inmates.

I wonder if this policy is still in effect or are the counterfeit goods destroyed.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

JasonB
November 13, 2010, 20:44
Originally posted by Munster30
Sounds to me like it should be a civil matter. Since when did producing and selling knock off purses and phony Rolex's have anything to do with public safety?

Because it is theft.

JasonB
November 13, 2010, 20:50
Originally posted by parisofthewest
I'm risking getting my Man Card revoked over this, but I dated a broad who was into purses and it seems that with those ugly ass Coach purses if they are fake, the seams will not line up. On the real one, where one panel meets another, the "C" print for Coach will overlap properly like well installed wallpaper.



That QC goes for nearly anything made in the orient. Bought a Cabela's wool sweater that was made in Australia years ago that felt great from day one and still looks good years later. I liked it enough I bought a second one from them in a different color a couple of years later, put it on and noticed it was scratchy and when I pulled it off I learned that "imported" this time meant it was from China. In addition to being scratchy, it pills like crazy and looked like crap in short order. No reduction in price however and it actually may have been higher.

akajun
November 13, 2010, 21:38
Originally posted by bnz42
Wow, you guys should try shopping on Canal Street!:biggrin:

Yeah even the women are counterfiet.

Pistolwiz
November 14, 2010, 11:51
Originally posted by L Haney


Yep. Ain't it great how property can now be guilty of a crime and have to be incarcerated? Guy I grew up with was growing a few pot plants, they confiscated all his dads farm equipment and sold it at a county auction. All the plants were hand tended, all 8 of them. The tractor, end loader, and hay balers were found guilty and sold into indentured servitude. They wanted to confiscate the barn, half a mile from the plants, but it was deemed a permanent fixture.

The supremes have weighed in on this. But the fedgov ignores many supreme court decisions anyway......


The Fourth Amendment requires that all seizures of property by the U.S. government must be preceded by service of a warrant upon the party whose property is to be seized:

"The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable seizures shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

The Fourth Amendment requires that the person who signs or issues the warrant authorizing seizure must be a neutral magistrate as indicated in the annotated Fourth Amendment.

Issuance by Neutral Magistrate: In numerous cases, the Court has referred to the necessity that warrants be issued by a ''judicial officer'' or a ''magistrate.''

[1] ''The point of the Fourth Amendment, which often is not grasped by zealous officers, is not that it denies law enforcement the support of the usual inferences which reasonable men draw from evidence. Its protection consists in requiring that those inferences be drawn by a neutral and detached magistrate instead of being judged by the officer engaged in the often competitive enterprise of ferreting out crime. Any assumption that evidence sufficient to support a magistrate's disinterested determination to issue a search warrant will justify the officers in making a search without a warrant would reduce the Amendment to a nullity and leave the people's homes secure only in the discretion of police officers.''

[2] These cases do not mean that only a judge or an official who is a lawyer may issue warrants, but they do stand for two tests of the validity of the power of the issuing party to so act. ''He must be neutral and detached, and he must be capable of determining whether probable cause exists for the requested arrest or search.''

[3] The first test cannot be met when the issuing party is himself engaged in law enforcement activities,

[4] but the Court has not required that an issuing party have that independence of tenure and guarantee of salary which characterizes federal judges.

[5] And in passing on the second test, the Court has been essentially pragmatic in assessing whether the issuing party possesses the capacity to determine probable cause.

[6] The Federal Government routinely seizes property from citizens without first litigating to obtain a warrant from a neutral magistrate.
The Supreme Court said that persons are entitled to a due process hearing prior to the seizing of property as follows: "The right to a prior hearing has long been recognized by this Court [Supreme Court] under the Fourteenth and Fifth Amendments…[T]he court has traditionally insisted that, whatever its form, opportunity for that hearing must be provided before the deprivation at issue takes place."

See Bell v. Burson, 402 U.S. 535, 542, Wisconsin v. Constantineau, 400 U.S. 433, Goldberg v. Kelly, 397 U.S. 254, Armstrong v. Manzo, 380 U.S. 551.

The due process hearing prior to seizure must occur at the point where the seizure of property can be prevented as follows:
"If the right to notice and a hearing is to serve its full purpose, it is clear that it must be granted at a time when the deprivation can still be prevented. At a later hearing, an individual's possessions can be returned to him if they were unfairly or mistakenly taken in the first place. Damages may even be awarded him for wrongful deprivation. But no later hearing and no damage award can undo the fact that the arbitrary taking that was subject to the right of due process has already occurred. This Court [the Supreme Court] has not embraced the general proposition that a wrong may be done if it can be undone."

Stanley v. Illinois, 405 U.S. 645, 647, 31 L.Ed.2d 551, 556,.Ct. 1208 (1972)

Jailguard
November 14, 2010, 13:18
The City of St Petersburg will seize your car for soliciting prostitution. That is truely out of line.

On a diffrent note I have also learned how to spot the fake coach stuff. I have a 16yo daughter that is into all that stuff and works fo a secondhand clothig store here in town she shwoed me what to look for.