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View Full Version : How to Tiger stripe wood stock???


plm454
May 28, 2009, 03:40
I have seen a few "tiger striped" wood M14/M1A stocks and they look awesome.
I'm looking for info on how to do just that. Any help is greatly appreciated.

USMC 0341
May 28, 2009, 04:38
This is in the grain of the wood - a natural phenomena.

I have heard of a way to replicate this with an acid but I cannot remember how that is done.

0007
May 28, 2009, 09:21
I know some people have done that using a propane torch.

gunplumber
May 28, 2009, 10:32
cut the stripe(s) out of a piece of sheet metal and use the torch on your stencil. Be VERY cautious as the difference between a darkened stripe and a blackened burn is a half inch in distance or a second in duration.
/

Blue Monster
May 28, 2009, 12:32
+1
difference between a darkened stripe and a blackened burn is a half inch in distance or a second in duration.

The process works well but you can f it up in a nano second and there is no deep 3D.
First practice, practice, practice on something first... or get wood with the movement already in it:
(tinted Maple)
http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r61/bluemonster2003/other%20than%20FAL%20wood/101_0182.jpg

gunplumber
May 28, 2009, 13:16
is that natural or did you do it?

I have a FUGLY garand birch stock I might do that way just for kicks.

Blue Monster
May 28, 2009, 13:55
That be natural Tiger striped Maple, I just color tinted it to bring it up and darken it then I put a finish on it. Some seriously tight curl and very hard to sand level but stunning depth.

The method I think may be cool for a fugly birch stock would be the Kentucky rifle "cannon fuse" method or copper wire wrap. Either could give you a tight pattern vs. the standard M-14 "fired" stripes. I have messed with both methods a little.

gunplumber
May 28, 2009, 14:59
Originally posted by Blue Monster
The method I think may be cool for a fugly birch stock would be the Kentucky rifle "cannon fuse" method or copper wire wrap. Either could give you a tight pattern vs. the standard M-14 "fired" stripes. I have messed with both methods a little.

I'm all ears. Wrap in cannon fuse and light? Or wrap in copper wire and then what? hook up to a battery?

Blue Monster
May 28, 2009, 15:29
Yes wrap it in fuse and light the fuse, the erratic nature of the burn will give it an organic look. They used black powder fuses in the day of course. They wrapped it tight completely covering the stock.
I have read that this was done to harden the wood as well as for looks, probably too fast to do much hardening

Big wire 10ga + wrap it around and move it around to make a pattern you like then a couple light passes with the torch. Copper just works as a template and transfers heat better and just on the line where it touches the wood if you get my drift.

You can really get creative with either method.

jdmcomp
May 28, 2009, 16:09
Years ago Dixie Gun Works published the method in their catalog. It involved soaking large twisted natural fiber rope in a mixture of iron filings and diluted (sulfuric?) acid then wrapping the rope around the stock tightly and allowing it to dry. The markings left in the wood are the tiger strip pattern. I am sure that there is more to the process and I will try to find one of the old catalogs to look up this method.

Blue Monster
May 28, 2009, 16:21
Yeah I remember that, basically rusting the wood. Very cool thanks.

goldenspurholderx2
May 28, 2009, 18:34
My brother-in-law used a jute rope soaked in water, wrapped the rope around the wood then used a propane torch. The wood burned in the spaces the rope wasn't, he didn't burn it uniformly but moved the torch around and came out with a nice french fusil muzzle loader stock after rubbing in God knows how many coats of oil.

gunplumber
May 28, 2009, 21:22
Originally posted by jdmcomp
Years ago Dixie Gun Works published the method in their catalog. It involved soaking large twisted natural fiber rope in a mixture of iron filings and diluted (sulfuric?) acid then wrapping the rope around the stock tightly and allowing it to dry. The markings left in the wood are the tiger strip pattern. I am sure that there is more to the process and I will try to find one of the old catalogs to look up this method.

wow - that's the first I've heard of that method, but it makes sense.

jdmcomp
May 29, 2009, 07:23
From the 1995 catalog of Dixie Gun Works (everybody should have at least one DGW catalog on the shelf), which, in my collection of gun books is quite new being only 13 years old. To directly quote Turner,

“Artificial Tiger Stripe: All my life I have heard and read that the old timers stripped their straight grained maple stocks by burning rope that was wrapped around the stock.

I do not believe this.

Of all the thousands of Kentucky rifles I have examined, none have showed any evidence of actual burning.

What I think they did was use a 50% solution of water and muriatic acid with iron filings or steel wool dissolved in the solution and this was stripped on and allowed to penetrate the wood which in two or three months, through a chemical reaction, changed to an oxide and became dark.”

I have not tried this so whatever you do be careful. I met Turner on a couple of occasions and I can state that everyone of us owes him a big debt. Turner was the man Bill Ruger just though he was.

gunplumber
May 29, 2009, 09:54
not prepared to wait 2-3 months, so I'll have to try something else.

USMC 0341
May 29, 2009, 10:07
Originally posted by jdmcomp
use a 50% solution of water and muriatic acid with iron filings or steel wool dissolved in the solution

There it is. That's what I was told by a Japanese guy who has read, researched, and knows a trainload of weird, off-the-wall facts about the American pioneer/mountanman era that I had never considered.

I couldn't remember the word in English.... [SIZE=1]fuggin' been here too long][SIZE=1]

gunplumber
May 29, 2009, 10:17
"muriatic" is just another name for HCL, although it seems to be standardized at 18 deg Baumic.

glockshot
June 05, 2009, 16:06
There is a chemical you can get from dixie gun works for enhanceing tiger stripes as well as adding some of your own.I have used it on a couple of my '14 birch stocks.If you are adding your own strips,you need to make sure you use a radom pattern when applying. I suggest a little practice.It is called Hexivailent chromium. About $11.00 a jar..........Glock