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tac-40
February 27, 2009, 21:45
I am in the process of refinishing a stock that has been around. I have stripped off all of the old finish and removed most of the stain. This stock had several different layers of finish on it ending in some sort of shiny varnish. It had been stained a bright red before the varnish was applied. After letting the stock dry for a couple of days, I noticed that it was fuzzy looking. I guess the washing to remove the stripper lifted the grain a little bit. I tried to sand it using 220 grit but it still remains fuzzy in places. I don't want to be too aggressive and remove a lot of the wood on this 100 year old stock, so I need your help.

I plan on using tung oil as the finish and all of the sanding sealers I have seen don't say anything about using an oil finish. They only say that you should apply a varnish or poly topcoat.

My question to you is, how do I get rid of the fuzziness with minimal wood removal and what are your recommendations for any product you use?

brownknees
February 27, 2009, 21:59
Scotchbrite pads, really!

Firestarter
February 27, 2009, 22:19
A good piece of burlap. Non aggressive and thus takes a bit of time and commitment.

But the finished product will be very nice.

boman
February 27, 2009, 22:22
Never used a sanding sealer----applying the tung oil finish and sanding lightly w 320 between coats will remove the raised grain. use as many coats as necessary to fill the open grain sanding between each coat. apply min wax and polish with a soft cloth.
I've used around 12 or 15 coats to finish custom bolt guns this way.

Steve

brownknees
February 27, 2009, 22:40
Try something called "old english scratch remover", after applying the tung oil.
It comes in light & dark, can be mixed to make in-between colors & is available form home improvment stores.
Excellent stuff I finsh all wood with it now.

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h29/moosp/actionleft.jpg
dark finish.

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h29/moosp/DSCF6247.jpg
light finish.

Bentley8
February 28, 2009, 02:30
I second the use of scotchbrite pads. I use the gray ones at Home Depot, they aren't aggressive (I think they are the equivalent of 000 steel wool). Go with the grain with a medium to light touch. I move the pad briskly until it looks like the wood is slightly polished.

tac-40
February 28, 2009, 22:05
I second the use of scotchbrite pads. I use the gray ones at Home Depot, they aren't aggressive (I think they are the equivalent of 000 steel wool). Go with the grain with a medium to light touch. I move the pad briskly until it looks like the wood is slightly polished.

I got some of these grey pads at Lowes. The label says they are for using in between coats. Rubbed lightly and where the raised grain was, the wood turned white. Kept at it for another couple of minutes and the wood ended up looking like I had buffed it up on a wheel. These thing really work. Didn't remove anything but the raised grain. It didn't even change the profile of the corner where the inletting was. Applied one coat of tung oil and let it dry for a day. Used the pad again and the stock is looking good. Still have a lot of dents and dings but I think they lend character to the rifle. I surely don't want a stock that looks new on a old rifle with the well used patina.

Now for the long process of oil, dry, rub out, oil, dry, rub out............. Don't know how many coats I'll put on, but I figure at least 5 or 6.

paul f
February 28, 2009, 22:57
If you want to do a first-class job, give it a good going over with 0000# steel wool. Then take a damp cloth and rub over the wood, and quickly dry the stock over a heat source (being mindful of burning it of course). This will bring out the left over "whiskers". Repeat this process until you feel no more of the whiskers of wood. This is an old method employed by stockmakers. It is known, of course, as "whiskering". I build longrifles as well as FALs and I will sometimes whisker a stock as many as eight or nine times. The finish will be spot-on and you remove very little wood.

Paul F.

muttman
March 01, 2009, 11:51
Paul,
I used the wiskering type of refinishing on my m/n 44 stock but I did not use 0000 wool, I used some "red" scotchbrite pads and got a smoth finish after 4 coats. I did raise the grain after each sanding this method works real well.

muttman

tac-40
March 01, 2009, 14:12
If you want to do a first-class job, give it a good going over with 0000# steel wool. Then take a damp cloth and rub over the wood, and quickly dry the stock over a heat source (being mindful of burning it of course). This will bring out the left over "whiskers". Repeat this process until you feel no more of the whiskers of wood. This is an old method employed by stockmakers.

If I was working on virgin wood I would probably try that technique. However, I am trying to clean up a 100 yr old stock that had many dings, dents ,and deep scratches in it that "whiskering" would be like putting makeup on a pig. I was just trying to get rid of a varnish coat (not original) and some very red stain (also not original). In the course of doing so, I raised the grain a little. The scotchbrite pads are working fine. I will be going over each coat of tung oil (I know, not original either, but easier than BLO) with the pads. That should "whisker" the wood sufficiently to get it looking good.

My biggest concern was removing too much wood in the sanding and finishing process thereby ruining the stock by altering its profile, even if just by a little.

muttman
March 02, 2009, 13:52
if dent or dings are your consern then try steam to rais the dents. a wet wash cloth and an iorn work wornders to raise the ding's up. muttman

tac-40
March 02, 2009, 17:27
I really don't want to make the wood look new. I am just trying to get rid of a crappy finish applied by who knows using some shiny varnish-like stuff. It even had runs and drips in the finish. I know that this was not the original finish and got rid of the varnish and most of that damned red stain that was under it. In doing so, I raised the grain and needed to take it down so the rifle didn't appear to be fuzzy and in need of a shave. I didn't want to alter the wood or get rid of its character (dings and dents).

So far the advice given here has been spot on and the refinishing is coming along nicely. I now have a couple of coats of tung oil on on the wood and have used the grey scotchbrite finishing pads in-between each coat. A couple more applications and this rifle will be put back together.

The only other issue with the rifle is the barrel is slightly overtimed and it shoots about 5 inches to the right at 100 yds. So I am going to try to break the barrel loose and retime it so the sights will be centered and the alignment marks are in agreement. Just gotta find an action wrench that will fit so I don't end up torqueing the receiver.

Dirt1042
March 02, 2009, 18:55
I'm with you on leaving the character on the stock tac. The scocth brit pads will work good, I use 0000 steel wool, but they have the same effect. How many coats of oil you need depends on how far you stripped the stock and how dry it is afterward.

It's a long process,but you'll get her looking like she should and that's what makes buying the older guns fun:]

brownknees
March 02, 2009, 22:08
JM2C here, but when I re-finished a South African Savage Enfield I did stean some of the more obnoxious dents. But I left enough in there that the rifle still had that "well lived in" charecter. It's not an all or nothing thing IMHO, you can stop partway.:biggrin:

Dirt1042
March 03, 2009, 00:37
Originally posted by Lewis Wetzel
I've done the 'wood thing' for Yamaha and Baldwin pianos, consultant and "hands-on" work for various furniture manufacturers...

If you want the straight dope of finishes, give me a private message.

Too much to list here...much info listed here is from amateurs....



:bow: :bow: :bow:

We R prostating ourselves in your presence, almighty one!

FALs&45s
March 03, 2009, 09:52
Originally posted by Dirt1042

:bow: :bow: :bow:

We R prostating ourselves in your presence, almighty one!

well, some aren't quite so offended and we are merely prostRate.

Dirt, wash your hands before typing more LOL!

tac-40
March 03, 2009, 10:18
If you want the straight dope of finishes, give me a private message.

Too much to list here...much info listed here is from amateurs...

LW, thanks for the offer but I'll stick with the amateurs. I am a serious wood butcher. While I can make metal and things mechanical do almost anything with a few simple tools, I cannot cut a straight line with a mitre saw. :cry: :cry: So when I work with wood, I follow the KISS principles.

Dirt1042
March 03, 2009, 11:12
Originally posted by FALs&45s


well, some aren't quite so offended and we are merely prostRate.

Dirt, wash your hands before typing more LOL!

I assure you sir, this was no error in spelling.

I was not offended as well, just having a little fun:)

Dang it, I gotta stop hangin out in DB:rofl:

FALs&45s
March 03, 2009, 13:39
Originally posted by Dirt1042
this was no error in spelling.

excellent!
PMSL!
:rofl:

Blue Monster
March 03, 2009, 23:39
Shop trick:

If you use 0000 steel wool, afterward take a soft cotton cloth and wrap it around a large rare earth magnet. Then caress you stock (almost said wood) with the cloth. I don't like steel fur in my finishes.