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View Full Version : Picked up Polytech M1A, need advice


armed1
February 10, 2009, 18:54
I picked up a Polytech M1A today for $750 from a guy at a gun club. It appears unfired, 100% condition. The chamber and bore appear chrome lined and are pristine except for the dust that has been accumulating in it for maybe 20 years. It has a fake flash hider and a crummy bakelite forend.

Did I get a good deal? Are these guns any good to shoot? Dose anyone know how to get the fake hider off? Anyone know how to field strip and clean it? I didn't plan on buying this gun so I don't know much about it. It was just there and it seemed like a good deal so I grabbed it.

USMC 0341
February 10, 2009, 19:01
Yes, you got a screaming deal.

The recievers on those rifles are forged and machined - rather than cast. Lots of high power shooters prefer them to just about anything else on the market.

Your fake hider may be silver soldered on which would take some heat to remove. Once you do this you should be able to put on a standard GI unit.

Nice score!

vmtz
February 10, 2009, 19:18
Good score. Remember it maybe headspaced for 7.62 Nato and not .308. No problem if you are shooting mil-surp, but if you are shooting .308 the headspace maybe too long.

Fr. Vince

John Crusher
February 10, 2009, 20:17
Yes, you did well. The fake hider has an allen set screw in it.(metric) It probably won't be silver soldered, but you will need a pair of pliers designed for the nut. I have several of them, both Poly and Norinco and they are my 3rd most favorite rifles.

tiblow
February 10, 2009, 22:01
YES!!

Lucky you!!! :smile: :smile: :wink: :wink:

armed1
February 10, 2009, 23:02
I ran some patches through the bore and gave the gun a good looking over. It is in fact unfired. There is not a spot of carbon, copper, or brass on it. The bolt face has 100% finish, and the inside of the hider is spotless. The bore is mirror. The gas piston is spotless. I'm psyched.

Regarding the flash hider, it looks like it is one piece along with the front sight. There is some weird looking knearled thing at the back of it too. Is it one piece? Where is the set screw?

1811GNR
February 11, 2009, 00:16
The set screw is right under the front sight in the front. Back it out then unscrew the castle nut til it touches the front of opening, tap the muzzle device forward and start over. Remember, you can only have 10 Evil Foreign Parts on that critter if you put a flash hider on it.
Check the headspace with a 7.62 HS gauge not .308. Check it regularly as some chinese M14s had soft bolts. Replace the recoil spring.
You got a good deal there.
For more info you should check out M14tfl.com.

armed1
February 11, 2009, 00:27
Thanks for the help. I think I will put a good US stock on it. Any idea where to get parts?

mojo_matic
February 11, 2009, 02:39
DO NOT be swayed into a barrel swap! The Chi-Com chrome lined barrel are VERY nice shooters.

Now the bolt, there is solid evidence that earlier Polytech bolts are not properly heat-treated and headspace may loosen up over time... this has nothing to do with whether the rifle was built for .308 or 7.62 NATO.

There are some who will state that Norinco receivers are not properly heat treated. Personally, I think it is propaganda from US manufacturers and gunsmiths trying to poo-poo and milk cash out of an inexpensive (yet decent and sometimes superior) rifle.

Keep a eye on your headspace after every trip to the range. If your headspace opens up on you, look into swapping it out for a USGI example, which MAY require help from a gunsmith. A NIW TRW USGI bolt dropped right into one of my Polytechs with a little lapping.

Oh, by the way, NICE SCORE!!!

:beer:

armed1
February 11, 2009, 10:45
Is there any way to heat treat the bolt?

USMC 0341
February 11, 2009, 11:32
Only if you know both exactly what is in the steel and exactly how it was heat treated so far.

In other words, no.

gunshack
February 11, 2009, 12:01
Originally posted by armed1
Is there any way to heat treat the bolt?

The chinese used 4140 so they wouldn't have to heat treat it. If you do, it'll harden all the way through and be as brittle as concrete. Not a good thing for a firearm bolt.

Another thing about the foux flash hider, if you take it off and put a real one on you get into 922(r) compliance violations...

EricCartmanR1
February 11, 2009, 12:31
These are the best Non-USGI M14 type Receivers available.

Barrel is chrome lined and good to go

Oprod is good to go

+1 on what others said, early models had soft bolt problems which led to excessive headspace.

Timber Wolf
February 11, 2009, 15:22
Some of the Norincos and Polytechs had the front sight base/flash hider spot welded to the castle nut to prevent removal. Few seconds with a dremal and cut off wheel should take care of that. Be aware of 922r issues if you "reactivate" the flash hider. CTD (Cheaper Than Dirt) advertises a new front sight base/flash hider (w/out front sight) for I think around $45. You would need to use your existing (metric) castle nut so be carefull getting it off. Stocks are available from several sources. I put a USGI fiberglass on my Norinco (really cheap from CTD, waaaay back) and wood (probably birch) on my Poly found at a gun show several years ago. Good luck, they are great guns and a nice compliment to your FALs.:wink: :wink:

armed1
February 11, 2009, 18:33
Whats all this from Fulton armory about I have to change the barrel, bolt, op rod, trigger group or else its no good and I will blow myself up? I dont think its an early model. The serial number is 12xxx.

mojo_matic
February 11, 2009, 20:01
Originally posted by armed1
Whats all this from Fulton armory about I have to change the barrel, bolt, op rod, trigger group or else its no good and I will blow myself up? I dont think its an early model. The serial number is 12xxx.

Just trying to turn you into a chump so they can take your $$$.

molonlabe texan
February 11, 2009, 20:30
www.warbirdscustomguns.com

Tim has mine right now.:]

ByronF
February 11, 2009, 20:35
Call me a nerd, freak, pervert, lazy, cheap, dumbass, etc, but I'd not get all itchy to spend money on compliance parts to install a flash hider. I might paint the bottom of the slots black to make it look not so queer then I'd shoot the hell out of it as-is. Actually I likely would install USGI walnut or a SA Inc walnut stock that you could probably find for cheap. It's not like the slots turn the rifle into a dusk to dawn cloaking device.

Byron

EricCartmanR1
February 11, 2009, 21:47
Here is from the Warbird Website:


POLYTECH, NORINCO

Polytech & Norinco owners must read this about USGI bolt conversion

This information will educate you about how to avoid so-called gunsmiths & armorers who claim they know how to do the USGI bolt conversion to your Polytech or Norinco.

If others charge a fee for a tech inspection, that's your first clue that you should find someone else to do the work. They should already know what needs to be done, not trying to educate themselves by working on a customers rifle.

I never charge a fee for a tech inspection, ever. I don't need to because I know what needs to be done to install a USGI bolt properly. Also, the Chinese barrel "can be used" when I do the USGI bolt conversion. "You don't need a new commercial barrel" as most so-called gunsmiths claim. Bottom line is they just want your money.

Please remember that Chinese rifles converted to use a USGI bolt by these inexperienced people will not be accepted by me, to do work on. The USGI bolt conversion is not being done correctly by those people because they don't have the experience to do it right.

I will only accept Chinese rifles with a USGI bolt conversion already done, if Smith Ent. or myself did the work. It's my intention to help customers avoid very costly mistakes.

I have done 1000's of these bolt conversions and not 1 customer has ever had a problem. My reputation far exceeds me and customer satisfaction is always guaranteed. I have been doing the USGI bolt conversion on Chinese receivers for over 22 years. The other so-called gunsmiths are just starting and have no experience at all. You be the judge. I believe you will make the right choice and rely on a true expert with years of experience.


Please Read

In the last 6 months we have received many rifles with excessive fouling, dirt, grit and grease. It appears that about 25% of our customers are not properly maintaining their equipment. I'm now requiring "all" rifles to have detailed cleaning done before shipping to us. If we need to clean excessive amounts of grime from rifles to do the work wanted by customers, a $20 cleaning fee will apply. The military taught me that a properly maintained rifle will always function correctly and wear & tear on parts will be a minimum.





Convert Chinese Norinco or Polytech receiver for USGI bolt $125

Chinese bolt conversion requires refinishing the barreled receiver, no exceptions.

Blueprint (gauge critical tolerances) your receiver (fitting new receiver is extra) $100

Blueprinting includes a copy of receiver specs in writing & given to the customer.

Add For USGI bolt Ask (a few are available)

Refinish barreled receiver with mil-spec parkerizing $75.00

Refinish complete rifle (includes gas system) $150.00

Add for stock parts $20.00

Fit Boyds or Wenig stock to any receiver $40.00

Drill connector lock hole for USGI connector lock, (includes lock) $35.00

mojo_matic
February 13, 2009, 10:36
Originally posted by ByronF
Call me a nerd, freak, pervert, lazy, cheap, dumbass, etc, but I'd not get all itchy to spend money on compliance parts to install a flash hider. I might paint the bottom of the slots black to make it look not so queer then I'd shoot the hell out of it as-is. Actually I likely would install USGI walnut or a SA Inc walnut stock that you could probably find for cheap. It's not like the slots turn the rifle into a dusk to dawn cloaking device.

Byron

You will definitely want to swap out the Chi-com stock. For a shooter, I recommend a USGI synthetic stock. The stock will provide a much tighter lock-up than most surplus wood, which translates in better accuracy. The synthetic stock is easily painted and is resistant to dings and gouges. Even if you decide to pick up a wood stock, consider keeping a synthetic stock on hand for rainy days at the range, hunting, and other general use. Best of all, they are cheap... easily picked up for under $50. Avoid a synthetic stock with splatter paint finish (like those from SA)... the finish chips and is a PIA to refinish.

Finding nice GI wood with solid lock-up is a bit of a dice roll, and will take some work (either leg work and $$$ to find a pristine example, or time in the shop bringing an old goat back to life). Bringing old USGI wood stocks back to life can be very rewarding... and time consuming. I prefer the birch stocks, especially the fat "big red" examples, for the wood is more dense and the figure "can" be awsome.

USMC 0341
February 13, 2009, 10:55
If you are going to put on a GI flash hider but are concerned about 922(r) compliance issues all you need to do is change out for a US made stock and only run US made magazines in it - sell any ChiCom magazines you got with it. Then you will only have ten "evil" imported parts in it and you're golden.

gunshack
February 13, 2009, 11:08
Originally posted by armed1
Whats all this from Fulton armory about I have to change the barrel, bolt, op rod, trigger group or else its no good and I will blow myself up? I dont think its an early model. The serial number is 12xxx.

I did my own conversion ala SEI and Warbirds methods. I used my original Poly barrel, gas system, op rod, etc.

I traded out the hammer and trigger/sear assembly with M1 Garand parts because the originals weren't doing their job properly. The trigger/sear assembly counts as 3 compliance parts. The hammer, bolt and handguard got me to the 6 I needed to install a SAI muzzle break (which is made in Taiwan I suspect.) I also needed to replace the rear sights on my Poly. The parts were machined all catawampus.

If the way Fulton does their USGI bolt conversions is the same way Walt Kuleck recommends it in his book, it's a hack job IMHO. Stick with Warbird or SEI on this one.

mojo_matic
February 13, 2009, 13:54
Originally posted by gunshack


I did my own conversion ala SEI and Warbirds methods. I used my original Poly barrel, gas system, op rod, etc.

I traded out the hammer and trigger/sear assembly with M1 Garand parts because the originals weren't doing their job properly. The trigger/sear assembly counts as 3 compliance parts. The hammer, bolt and handguard got me to the 6 I needed to install a SAI muzzle break (which is made in Taiwan I suspect.) I also needed to replace the rear sights on my Poly. The parts were machined all catawampus.

If the way Fulton does their USGI bolt conversions is the same way Walt Kuleck recommends it in his book, it's a hack job IMHO. Stick with Warbird or SEI on this one.

Great advice on the trigger group. He could also keep eyes peeled for a complete Springfield Inc. assembly, which are frequently cast aside by those who desire a complete USGI rifle.

If the rear sight is sloppy, a Garand rear assembly will work fine. M14 rear sights will pull 2X+ $$$ as a common Garand rear sight. Only real different between the two is that the M14 elevation knob is graduated in meters instead of yards.

I inquired about a USGI bolt conversion with SEI a couple years back and felt that my needs were a bit "beneath them," and the cost was going to be insane. Warbird has a great reputation and his prices are very reasonable.

gunshack
February 13, 2009, 18:12
Hate to burst your bubble, mojo, but the SAI commercial trigger groups were not made in the USA. Most likely they were made by Wayne Machine in Taiwan.

Warbirds Custom Guns
February 15, 2009, 05:35
Originally posted by gunshack


I did my own conversion ala SEI and Warbirds methods. I used my original Poly barrel, gas system, op rod, etc.

If the way Fulton does their USGI bolt conversions is the same way Walt Kuleck recommends it in his book, it's a hack job IMHO. Stick with Warbird or SEI on this one.

I'm assuming you mean my method of using the original chromed barrel.
I do not & will not train anyone on how to do these USGI bolt conversions as machine work is involved to do it correctly.

In the past 2 guys have said they were trained by me on how to do the bolt conversion on Chinese receivers.
Simply put, I have never shown anyone how the work is done & never will.

Some Chinese receivers need more work than others.
Chinese receivers vary from 1 to another & the work required to do the bolt conversion.

In 2006 I started to write a how to manual on this subject. Because of my work load I haven't had the time to finish it. Maybe 1 day.

2barearms
February 15, 2009, 09:29
I don't like their wood stocks at all. If you change the stock beware the
connector lock for the spring guide is shorter than the USGI part. Ironically
the USGI Fiberglass stocks work great with no modification, the others will
require a shim to keep the lock from backing out and releasing the magazine.
The Connector Lock on the Chinese rifles has a pressed in solid pin that is
a bitch to get out, the Chinese Connector Lock is also smaller in diameter
than the USGI and will not fit the hole. It may be helpful to discuss this issue with Warbird before sending the rifle for mods. I've known Warbird for many years
and have never had a issue with any of his work. No one builds a nicer
M14 than he does for the money. The last place I'd send a rifle to is Fulton,
while Clint does fine work it takes forever and he of course wants to replace
all the chicom parts for stuff he sells.

I at the very least would get an M1 Garand Post War T105 type Rear Sight
and replace the Trigger Group internals (hammer, trigger/sear, etc) these
as stated previously count against the 922r parts count. You can get a
Smith Coast Guard Brake or GI Flash suppressor for around the same price.
A fiberglass stock and GI handguard are also desirable changes. Get a few GI
mags(CMI Mags are fine) and you're on your way.

gunshack
February 18, 2009, 10:12
Originally posted by Warbirds Custom Guns


I'm assuming you mean my method of using the original chromed barrel.
I do not & will not train anyone on how to do these USGI bolt conversions as machine work is involved to do it correctly.

In the past 2 guys have said they were trained by me on how to do the bolt conversion on Chinese receivers.
Simply put, I have never shown anyone how the work is done & never will.

Some Chinese receivers need more work than others.
Chinese receivers vary from 1 to another & the work required to do the bolt conversion.

In 2006 I started to write a how to manual on this subject. Because of my work load I haven't had the time to finish it. Maybe 1 day.

I did not intend to imply you trained me. I've been working in manufacturing for 17 years, and have been (what I would call) a machinist for 14 years. An M14 receiver is a complicated piece of steel, but far from being the most complicated I've part I've worked on.

I did in fact machine the receiver lugs. I cut the left one using a modified key way cutter stuck through the receiver ring, and I cut the right one using an endmill and an angle vise. Both operations were done on my Bridgport mill. I had the receiver heat treated afterwards, and parkerized it after that.

If I alluded to fitting the bolt per your method it's only in reference to the fact the receiver lugs were machined to allow fitting, and not by some other method or removing material in some other location. I may not have used the exact same tools and strategy you or SEI use, but I think the end result is the same.

Warbirds Custom Guns
February 18, 2009, 10:30
Originally posted by gunshack

I did not intend to imply you trained me.

I know ya didn't. No problem there.
That's why I said..........
I'm assuming you mean my method of using the original chromed barrel.
Just so others know, there have been new guys stating I trained them when the opposite is true.
I think it's safe to say that you & I are on mutual terms.
Good luck in whatever ya do.

Originally posted by gunshack

I did in fact machine the receiver lugs. I cut the left one using a modified key way cutter stuck through the receiver ring, and I cut the right one using an endmill and an angle vise. Both operations were done on my Bridgport mill. I had the receiver heat treated afterwards, and parkerized it after that.
That could work if the receiver was heat treated properly after the machine work but, that would be costly to a customer which is why I have many bolts to choose from if the supplied bolt is to tight. Bolts vary in length & each will headspace differently.
Also, there's other areas of the receiver that need to be checked & fitted if needed. It's more invloved that just fitting a USGI bolt.

Perhaps some day time will allow me to finish the book I started.
Then some folks will know exactly what is involved & see why I say it's more than "just a bolt" issue.

gunshack
February 18, 2009, 10:52
Get that book done, I'll take one. :biggrin:

onebigelf
February 18, 2009, 23:44
One of the few guns I regret having gotten rid of. Put a synthetic stock on it, add a 3rd gen scope mount and go play.

John

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 19, 2009, 01:25
I had one in similar shape.....It looked fantastic. The damn thing would not hit a 4' x 8' peice of plywood at 50 yards. On the 10th shot the op rod popped off the bolt. It did it again.....a few shots later.....I got angry, it had issues, I got madder at it ......and thought to myself, Is this a rifle I would bet my life on? No freaking way.

I bought it for $750 and sold it for the same. To this day, in my opinoin they are one of the biggest POS's out there.

moses
February 19, 2009, 18:45
If the Chinese receivers are made out of the same steel (8620) as the USGI then they are only hardened about .012 to .018 deep. If you go machining on the locking lugs you are asking for trouble IMHO, because 8620 is soft after you get past the hardened shell. Thus the part of the receiver that is taking the 50,000 PSI every time you fire a round is soft. Not a good combination.

And the guy saying they used 4140 on the bolts so they don't need to harden it, 4140 is also pretty soft before it is hardened. (I think it is around 18 RC)
Also after you harden the 4140 you temper it to bring the hardness back down so it is not brittle. Barrels are usually made out of 4140 and are usually around 33 to 36 Rockwell hardness, FAL receivers are also made out of 4140 and are around 42 to 45 Rockwell hardness.
When you heat treat 4140 it hardens to the basic same hardness everytime (around 58 RC) and you temper it differently to get the final desired hardness.
http://www.eng-tips.com/faqs.cfm?fid=1290

I have done quite a few USGI bolt conversions for the Chicom M1A receivers and never had any problems what-so-ever.

tpad365
February 19, 2009, 19:27
I had one of these when they first came out.Brand new in the box at 400.00.that was then.I shot a lot of ammo through that gun and never had a problem as is.Head space never opened up and it shot great out of the box.ended up trdeing it for a Armscorp match reciever and built my own rifle.(took 4 months for the Armscorp reciever to arrive..big backlog)

armed1
February 20, 2009, 22:21
Thanks for all the replies. I didn't know it was going to be so involved and would need so much attention. I have not fired it, I think I will sell it for what I paid for it.

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 20, 2009, 22:56
Good choice! Take that money and put it into a real M1A from SA.....

gunshack
February 21, 2009, 12:17
Haha, the funny thing is a Polytech is more of a "real m14" than an off the shelf M1A is. SAI says their rifle is made in the USA, it's no more American than your kit FAL. It's built with just the right number of US made compliance parts to legally be called American. Even the receiver (which is final machined in the US and called "US Made") was cast in Canada up until a few years ago, and is likely cast in Australia, Brazil or Taiwan currently. To each his own.

I'm as anti-Chinese crap as any blue blooded American ought to be, but I can and will make exceptions depending on circumstances. If you want an all American rifle your only options are an Armscorp or LRB receiver built up with known American made parts...

I just did a safety inspection an all original Polytech for a customer, and sent him away with my blessing. He claimed the previous owner shot 5k rounds through it. The rifle was solid.

Moses,
I don't know for sure weather the Chinese heat-treated their bolts or not, but I do know 4140 will work harden. Even when properly hardened and annealed it'll continue to work harden when subject to constant bombardment of 50K psi. How many rounds will a 4140 bolt take before it gets as brittle as glass? I don't know, but I'll bet my ass it's less than a properly heat-treated 8620 bolt.

ThePitbullofLove
February 21, 2009, 13:01
Originally posted by moses
If the Chinese receivers are made out of the same steel (8620) as the USGI then they are only hardened about .012 to .018 deep. If you go machining on the locking lugs you are asking for trouble IMHO, because 8620 is soft after you get past the hardened shell. Thus the part of the receiver that is taking the 50,000 PSI every time you fire a round is soft. Not a good combination.

And the guy saying they used 4140 on the bolts so they don't need to harden it, 4140 is also pretty soft before it is hardened. (I think it is around 18 RC)
Also after you harden the 4140 you temper it to bring the hardness back down so it is not brittle. Barrels are usually made out of 4140 and are usually around 33 to 36 Rockwell hardness, FAL receivers are also made out of 4140 and are around 42 to 45 Rockwell hardness.
When you heat treat 4140 it hardens to the basic same hardness everytime (around 58 RC) and you temper it differently to get the final desired hardness.
http://www.eng-tips.com/faqs.cfm?fid=1290

I have done quite a few USGI bolt conversions for the Chicom M1A receivers and never had any problems what-so-ever.

http://images28.fotki.com/v1003/photos/2/28682/996390/m141-1-vi.jpg

Polytech M14S with a Moses installed TRW USGI Bolt.

It's GTG. :bow:

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 21, 2009, 14:58
I have seen far to many Chinese castings fail, to trust one made into a rifle.

Tractor engins, trannys, saws, water pumps......

Just my two cents...


Chinese castings = junk

AndyC
February 21, 2009, 15:17
I thought the Polytech receivers are machined - don't shoot me, I don't know M1As from my ass, but I want one :smile:

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 21, 2009, 15:45
Ah maybe some of them were? The one I had, had obvoius (rough) casting marks on it.

That would expalin a few things if some of them were cast, and some machined?

molonlabe texan
February 21, 2009, 19:15
Originally posted by Odd Gibbs Shooter
I have seen far to many Chinese castings fail, to trust one made into a rifle.

Tractor engins, trannys, saws, water pumps......

Just my two cents...


Chinese castings = junk

You obviously don't know shit about chinese M14's then

:rolleyes:

moses
February 21, 2009, 20:57
Gunshack, I really think you don't know what you are talking about with the 4140 steel.

So you are saying the FAL receiver work hardens as you shoot it and will eventually become brittle and crack? You know they are made of 4140 steel.

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 21, 2009, 21:29
You obviously don't know shit about chinese M14's then

You are correct! And I don't want to know shit about a piece of shit m14.

I do know a little something about texans though!

molonlabe texan
February 22, 2009, 01:06
Originally posted by Odd Gibbs Shooter


I do know a little something about texans though!

I doubt it.. :rolleyes: You've already demonstrated you're an idiot.

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 22, 2009, 01:42
Yep and your proving to be a fucktard texan!

molonlabe texan
February 22, 2009, 09:51
LOL.. go "buy American" and leave the real weapons to the men here Nancy.

:rolleyes:

I hear Colt has a discount program for turds like you.

molonlabe texan
February 22, 2009, 10:08
Originally posted by AndyC
I thought the Polytech receivers are machined

They are. To USGI specs.

ByronF
February 22, 2009, 10:21
Originally posted by Odd Gibbs Shooter
Ah maybe some of them were? The one I had, had obvoius (rough) casting marks on it.

That would expalin a few things if some of them were cast, and some machined?

"Cast vs Machined" is like "buiscut vs baked". I can machine a casting. I can machine a block of wood. I forge a piece of clay. Or a turd (turds are usually extruded, though).

Casting and forging are alternate means to arrive at a raw piece of material. After that they're BOTH machined. Some castings can approximate near-net shape in non-critical areas but precision areas must be machined. Forgings cannot approximate near-net as well so they require a lot more machining. In fact, some forgings don't even try to approximate basic shape and they simply pound out a rectangular billet and machine to shape. The closer a forging approximates final shape the stronger it should be because the grain direction follows the forging shape.

1811GNR
February 22, 2009, 11:40
Originally posted by armed1
Thanks for all the replies. I didn't know it was going to be so involved and would need so much attention. I have not fired it, I think I will sell it for what I paid for it.

Try to get it checked out first if you want an M14 type in your collection. The chicoms don't always need to be reworked to be good, safe shooters.

If you must sell it, where are you located? I might be interested.

armed1
February 22, 2009, 15:09
I'm in Colorado.

By the way Texan, if you have a mole on your labia, don't be ashamed. I know a gynecologist that can help you.

:rofl:

ByronF
February 22, 2009, 18:34
It's a MELON. Everything is bigger in Texas, you know.

BUFF
February 23, 2009, 01:53
Originally posted by ByronF:

"I can machine a casting. I can machine a block of wood. I forge a piece of clay. Or a turd (turds are usually extruded, though)."

BUWHAHAHAHAHAHAHHA!!!

Good one!

molonlabe texan
February 23, 2009, 20:28
Originally posted by armed1
I'm in Colorado.


Apparently google is broke in Colon-rado...

:rolleyes:

There is a shitload of good information on Chinese M-14s out there and not from dillhole lumberjacks..

armed1
February 23, 2009, 21:56
I'm going to put it on marketplace for $800 delivered.

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 24, 2009, 00:43
I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok......I work all day and.......you know the rest...


dillhole, now that's funny!

molonlabe texan
February 25, 2009, 16:32
Originally posted by armed1
I'm going to put it on marketplace for $800 delivered.

Post up some pics.. :D

Odd Gibbs Shooter
February 25, 2009, 19:27
Just for you texan, its on the second page in the Marketplace!

I even made um big for yah!!! Looks pretty nice!!



http://my.photodump.com/uploads/armed1/3473dafa31158021.JPG?28bc3c4f393692dd.JPG


http://my.photodump.com/uploads/armed1/af89c0845fae3140.JPG?3473dafa31158021.JPG


http://my.photodump.com/uploads/armed1/28bc3c4f393692dd.JPG?af89c0845fae3140.JPG

http://my.photodump.com/uploads/armed1/e2b947ac3c6901c1.JPG?28bc3c4f393692dd.JPG

USMC 0341
February 25, 2009, 20:38
I told you that was a screaming deal.

Even after you bumped the price $50 and then posted it late at night it was gone in 90 minutes.

armed1
February 25, 2009, 20:44
It belongs to uivandal now. I sold it for same price I paid FTF. It deserves a home where it will get turned into a shooter. It was my first, and probably last M1A. I prefer my FALS and ARs.

molonlabe texan
February 26, 2009, 10:51
The IDE polytechs and the heelstamps are the best of the chinky M14s..

someone got a great deal there.