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wonderdog451
January 30, 2009, 15:29
looking for some advice on dremel tools. which type of tool and accessories do you prefer and recommend?

UMR_Engnr
January 30, 2009, 15:43
I have had good luck with a cheap black and decker dremel tool. The tips I use most are the cutoff disc and the drum sanding tip. Dremels are awesome and well worth the little money they cost.

ostrobothnian
January 30, 2009, 15:46
All depends on the type of work you are doing. For metal work I have found the cutoff wheels to be indispensible. Also the sanding drums are great along with the carbide cutting bits. They even have a routing tool set and a ceramic tile cutting bit.

For more serious type (industrial) work you might look at one of these. Used to use these when I was a bench hand...

http://www.newmantools.com/foredom/index.html

chromestarhustler
January 30, 2009, 16:10
i use the dotco pencil grinder, uses the same accessories

http://www.bluetools.com/Air-Tools-Grinders-Pencil-Grinders/c88_43_45/p191/Dotco-Precision-Pencil-Grinder,-60,000-RPM,-12R0410-18/product_info.html

60000rpm buffs grinds and does endless cool stuff.

brownknees
January 30, 2009, 17:41
If you get a "dremel Dremel" make sure you get the version with the roller bearings, not the sleeved ones.
Specially if you're going to use it a lot.

L1A1rocker
January 30, 2009, 19:44
Sanding discs and polishing stuff mostly. I use the wire brush discs also. Get the stiffer ones, the lighter ones just fly apart.

I also use the long cable attachment that turns it into a pen dremil for getting into tight places.

Ron Walker
January 30, 2009, 20:10
If you're going to be doing a lot of that kind of work, and have an air compressor, you migght want to try a minature pneumatic die grinder instead of a Dremel. Longer life span. Ron

brownknees
January 30, 2009, 21:20
Originally posted by Lewis Wetzel


I use the Dremel with the lithium batteries....how can you tell about bearings?

(Note: I use mine A LOT. I've gone through two previously...mostly electrical control problems.)
The model numbers & specs will tell you what bearings you have.
I don't know about the battery powered ones though, I only use the a/c powered myself.

A +1 on the flex shaft, but avoid the angle attachment, I'm on #3 now & they all have the same problem. (weak drive cable not meshing properly with the 90 degree gear.)

NoNotAgain
January 30, 2009, 21:44
Originally posted by chromestarhustler
i use the dotco pencil grinder, uses the same accessories

http://www.bluetools.com/Air-Tools-Grinders-Pencil-Grinders/c88_43_45/p191/Dotco-Precision-Pencil-Grinder,-60,000-RPM,-12R0410-18/product_info.html

60000rpm buffs grinds and does endless cool stuff.

+1

Dotco die grinders will out last 10 Dremel tools.

The next closest to Dotco for life cycle is Aro.

I have killed a few Sioux minature die grinders, but for the money $60 from Enco, are hard to beat. Also purchase an air line oiler and keep the tool lubricated. 60,000 rpm tools love oil.

jeffrey
January 30, 2009, 22:31
:uhoh: Wear eye protection...

Ask me why there's a divit in one of my magnifying eyeglass lenses.

Sgt Rock
January 31, 2009, 03:01
[QUOTE]Originally posted by NoNotAgain
[B]

+1

Dotco die grinders will out last 10 Dremel tools.



At $370.00 that's about 10 dremels!

Use diamond grinding wheels. Harbor freight has them. When on sale can be had for $15.00 for a set of about 50 different shapes. Outlasts stones big time.

NoNotAgain
January 31, 2009, 06:45
Originally posted by Sgt Rock

At $370.00 that's about 10 dremels!

Use diamond grinding wheels. Harbor freight has them. When on sale can be had for $15.00 for a set of about 50 different shapes. Outlasts stones big time. [/B]

Sgt,

The main problems I have with Dremel tools are the size of tool and that the speed controller usually takes a shit before the tool wears out.

Secondly, running a Dremel for more than 15 minutes at a time, Dremel's get quite warm.

At work I'm the person that draws the short straw to perform precision grinding on flow models that were created by stereo lithography. This process basically prints metal layer by layer to fabricate rapid prototyping parts.

The process can build up layers by .001" per pass but on a part that's 12" X12" takes forever. The powers that be decided to print layers at .015-.020" per pass to save time. Once everyone gets done patting themselves on the back, I get to smooth out the high spots.

I needed a super small flex shaft version for one job and wiped out the local Sears for all of the Dremel flex shafts that they had. A couple of days later I returned the remains for store credit.

Dotco grinders are cheap compared to the electric ones made by Dumore.

chromestarhustler
January 31, 2009, 08:39
370 seventy is pretty steep for the dotco pencil grinder. but they cost a whole lot less around here, the aircraft plants use them and have surplus sales. i think mine is lightly used and i got i think 40 in it.

got me 2 dotcos, a pencil grinder, and drills and rivet guns all pretty cheap. one tool i am missing is a pnuematic A or C squeeze for ak builds but the rivet gun will get the job done.

its the dotco pads and disk they get you on, a buckish a piece horrible.