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Douglas S Graham
January 18, 2009, 08:45
I know there's a way to bring out the tiger stripes in a buttstock. Can anyone please provide the step by step way. Thanks!!!!!!!!!! Doug.

tacklenut62
January 18, 2009, 08:55
Doug,

Are you refering to applying a tiger stock pattern on a stock. If so Look at Lauer products for a complete selection of camo pattern stencils. Basically, peel and stick. You can also apply a base color, then tear small strips of painters tape length wise. This will give you a template for stripes. Apply some of these and repaint with another color. Leave these on and apply yet another group of templates and paint with your third color. After they dry completely, carefully remove the tape and there is your stripes.

Follow paint directions for cleaning the surface of the stock or gun to avoid disappointing results.
Lauer has a good selection patterns.

brownknees
January 18, 2009, 09:09
I'm thinking he is trying to enhance the existing grain?

***warning! Try this on scrap wood first***

Do you have a propane torch?

Here's a good trick, but it needs to be right the first time as there are no redos.

If you have a flame spreader put it on the torch. If not, then you just have to be a bit more carefull.

You need to "spray paint" the wood with the flame just about 1/2" away from the wood. Using steady fairly fast passes, & like spraying paint, keep going past the ends before treversing the stroke. What this does is to controllably & lightly scorch the darker parts of the grain patterns. Once done very light surface sanding (or a ScotchBrite) with very light pressure to clean up the surface & re-finish as normal.

Practice on scrap till you're really sure you've got the technique down pat. You can re-use the same test piece by heavily sanding the old surface off if you're not happy.

Douglas S Graham
January 18, 2009, 09:29
Yes guys, I'm trying to enhance the wood. Thanks Brown, for you reply. I thought there was a chemical way of doing this?? I've also seen quite a few M1A stocks that are enhanced that are off the charts!!!!

davesrb
January 18, 2009, 10:29
You are looking for Chromium Trioxide stain I believe. It imparts a nice chestnut color to light maple or walnut and enhances any existing grain. Try Dixie Gun Works, Inc.

One note, the instructions tell you that a water and vinegar mix will lighten the dark up. It does, but the wood will still be a couple of shades darker than when you started. The grain will look better when you are washing it, but when you oil it, it really pops.

Davesrb

jdmcomp
January 18, 2009, 10:29
Seems I remember that Dixie Gun Works offered a method of wrapping a rope soaked in a chemical (basically iron oxide in some base) around the stock and letting it dry. The rope transferred the pattern of the strands to the wood. Other chemicals could be used I guess to achieve the same end. Try on scrap is good advice.

Douglas S Graham
January 18, 2009, 10:55
Davesrb, that's it, I think!! Thanks, I will try their website. DSG.

JohnnyReb
January 18, 2009, 15:52
Originally posted by davesrb
You are looking for Chromium Trioxide stain I believe. It imparts a nice chestnut color to light maple or walnut and enhances any existing grain. Try Dixie Gun Works, Inc.

One note, the instructions tell you that a water and vinegar mix will lighten the dark up. It does, but the wood will still be a couple of shades darker than when you started. The grain will look better when you are washing it, but when you oil it, it really pops.

Davesrb

Be careful with it. Don't get ANY on your skin. I wear gloves, long sleeves, and apron.

It can come out nice, but its a lot of work. I have had as good or better results with home made Rit dye alcohol based stains. (With less work and no toxic heavy metal exposure.)

JohnnyReb
January 18, 2009, 21:12
One of the most important steps is to get the stock really clean, and raise the grain. No grease or oil left in it. Take this one for example. I could see it had some nice striping under the years of grime.

http://www.falfiles.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=199420

First off, I sprayed it down with Easy Off oven cleaner (fume free max), and rinsed with HOT tap water. I did this twice, letting it sit for 4 minutes each time.

It still had some grime so I next ran it through the dishwasher with soap.

After it dried completely (two days), I still wasn't happy with it.

Next I soaked it in acetone, for about a week. Every two days or so I changed out the acetone with fresh, until it stopped changing color.

After drying for a day or so it was ready for sanding. It took a fair amount of sanding to get the top layer of "dead" wood off. I started with 220 and went up to 600.

I did not stain this one as I wanted a lighter color on this STG. I finished it with Behr Scandinavian Tung Oil Finish, then paste wax.

This was the end result:

http://www.falfiles.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=201247

Most wood working instructions lean towards getting a uniform color when staining, but we want the opposite effect to enhance the striping or figure. So when you get it good and clean, and raise the grain, you should get different uptake of the stain in the harder or softer parts of the wood. You can get very dramatic effects on birch, beech, and curly maple. More so than say walnut.

Rotor
January 19, 2009, 12:57
What type of wood is it?

I have had good luck bringing out striping with Chestnut ridge military stock stain (dye)

http://www.chestnutridge.com/products/misc.asp

It is alcohol based and very easy and safe to work with. If you put too much on just moisten a paper towel with denatured alcohol and lift what you put in the wood to achieve desired tone.

Here it is on a birch M14 stock that had "sleepy stripes". Topped the Behr's TOF.

Before

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a51/Rotor_/Stocks/M14/Tiger%20Before%20and%20After/TigerSide.jpg

After

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a51/Rotor_/Stocks/M14/Tiger%20Before%20and%20After/TigerLFTT.jpg

Before

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a51/Rotor_/Stocks/M14/Tiger%20Before%20and%20After/TigerBooty.jpg

After

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a51/Rotor_/Stocks/M14/Tiger%20Before%20and%20After/TigerButt.jpg

Dye will not make tiger where there is none. Dye and a deep oil finish will help it come out.


JR