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Potshot
January 10, 2009, 15:34
Gents,

Anyone build on one?

Are they any good?

shortround
January 10, 2009, 17:43
Originally posted by Potshot
Gents,

Anyone build on one?

Are they any good?

NO.

Ssarge
January 10, 2009, 20:13
Get an LRB or a Sprinfield Armory. The Entreprise were badly out of spec, and many M14 'smiths won't build them.

2 clicks low
January 11, 2009, 00:14
Is a LRB worth the money?

pistol5
January 11, 2009, 10:21
Worth is certainly a relative term. They are the finest rec's $ can buy at this time from a "purist" standpoint, are beautifully made examples of products of a time gone by, and will last forever. That said, function is no different than others that are properly made and less expensive. Sooooo...whether they're worth the $ is a decision each individual has to make based on where they place value. Regards, Wendell

bausch
January 18, 2009, 19:48
Yes but 7+ years ago the first one cracked when the barrel was screwed in
Enterprise replaced it and I am on my second barrel maybe 6000 rds on the first one.
The finish is great but the op rod dismounts easier than a Springy which means it maybe too loose but I won't sell it it has never failed me

TerryN
January 18, 2009, 21:19
And FWIW, even LRB makes a lemon from time to time. Recently on the Jouster M1/M14/M1A forum, one of the more knowledgeable Marine Armorers was commenting on a run of out-of-spec LRB receivers that he had worked with. He ended up sending them all back, IIRC.

m14e2
January 29, 2009, 20:27
I have one and it runs fine and is very accurate. I have a springfield also. They shoot very close to the same. All USGI and walnut stocks. Love them both.

gunshack
January 29, 2009, 21:36
Originally posted by TerryN
And FWIW, even LRB makes a lemon from time to time. Recently on the Jouster M1/M14/M1A forum, one of the more knowledgeable Marine Armorers was commenting on a run of out-of-spec LRB receivers that he had worked with. He ended up sending them all back, IIRC.

Can you post a link?

I've built a few LRBs and the only thing I've had issue with is the small op-rod tab release notch. I've had a couple of receivers come through where the notch was on teh small side, but nothing a little stoning on the op-rod tab wont fix.

And that's not a USGI spec feature anyway. The whole left side of any commercial receiver has variations from the USGI M14 due to NFA reasons.

Warbirds Custom Guns
February 15, 2009, 04:59
FWIW I recently built a rifle on an Enterprise receiver.
Fit & finish was excellent. Only very minor fitting was needed (less than LRB receivers).
I have seen a couple Enterprise receivers that needed a little more work but, they were still good receivers.
I've only seen 1 that could not be used to build a rifle.


Originally posted by TerryN
And FWIW, even LRB makes a lemon from time to time.
That could be true but, never seen one that was unusable yet.
I will say that recent LRB receivers I've seen need a lot of work & have more problems than before.
The inside of the receiver ring is one area. The bolt stop cut out & bottom inside of the heel. If a bolt won't travel to the rear, the receiver needs serious fitting. A couple guys are lapping the back of the bolt to make it work which is not correct.
I've also seen 3-4 that were very tight in the mag well area. Commercial mags may be to tight or not fit at all & USGI mags were very snug.

HTH

2barearms
February 15, 2009, 09:44
Many here are never gonna get the pleasure of wearing out an M14
barrel, it's simply to expensive to shoot enough ammo to do it.

It's interesting that many today are 'very concerned' with the Op Rod
tab thickness being as close to .099" thick as possible. Nothing is more
distressing than taking a file and stone to a brand new Op Rod. This
is because starting with Armscorp they discovered many USGI Op Rods
had some wear on them. No one at the time would rework an Op Rod
tab because they only cost $35 to $50. I checked an LRB receiver in the
drawer the other day and it was cut small also. While it is painful to have
to fit one, the opposite is true, that if they cut them for a full thickness tab
and you have a tab with significant wear you WILL have significant wobble
in the channel. It makes it more middle of the road for everyone.

TerryN
February 15, 2009, 21:13
Originally posted by gunshack


Can you post a link?

I've built a few LRBs and the only thing I've had issue with is the small op-rod tab release notch. I've had a couple of receivers come through where the notch was on teh small side, but nothing a little stoning on the op-rod tab wont fix.

And that's not a USGI spec feature anyway. The whole left side of any commercial receiver has variations from the USGI M14 due to NFA reasons.

Here's the one I'm thinking of. I may not have the particulars right, though; you may need to read the whole thread:

http://www.jouster.com/cgi-bin/garand/garand.pl?read=200037

Warbirds Custom Guns
February 15, 2009, 22:12
Terry

The post in that link describes many problems on the LRB receivers that were made in the past, maybe a year or so ago.
I agree with Gus that for the price they charge for those receivers, they should be much better.

The main problem I seen talked about most was mags not locking in.
That's because some receivers were cut to high for the trigger group lock up causing the mag catch to be to high. The mag couldn't be seated high enough to lock in on the tab on back of the mag.

The mag catch could be shortened & it will work fine.
Not the best cure but, the easiest.
The mag catch could be re-hardened (after annealing) if desired.

Many problems existed on LRB's when they came out.
They got a little better over time.
Now I see new problems that never existed before such as very narrow mag wells.

Building a M-14 type rifle from a new unfitted receiver takes years of experience. It's not something that can be learned in 6 months regardless who the person is.
Receiver fitting takes talent.
Newbies will always miss something or not correctly fit the receiver as it should be which is why I've always said, have someone who knows what they're doing build the rifle.

BTW, if a receiver is fitted correctly, all USGI parts should fit with few exceptions such as an op-rod tab.
A receiver is never fitted for just 1 set of parts as some newbies claim.

Just because it's a forged receiver doesn't make it the best.
Yes, you can quote me on that.

Here's the list I have for things so far that should be checked on LRB receivers. I'm sure there's 1 or 2 I'm forgetting.

1. Serrations for elevation knob.
They tried to "scratch" these in to save time or $$$
Many burrs can be found & these don't make for good NM rifles.

2. Bolt stop cut out.
Gotta know what to look for on this.

3. Inside of front receiver ring can be to tight for bolt to close with proper lug engagement.

4. Receiver bridge cut a little off spec.

5. Rear inside not cut correctly to allow bolt to cycle.
needs serious fitting.
Never lap the rear of the bolt to the receiver as this is not correct.

6. Receiver lugs varied from way to tight for new TRW bolt to being almost right on.
They made some receivers to accept worn bolts thinking folks buy those because they were cheaper than new ones.

6. Bolt stop pin hole to tight for roll pin to be installed.

2barearms
February 16, 2009, 06:39
It should also be noted that LRB builds rifles as their primary source
of work. The Receivers are made by a forging company and then are
machined by a machine shop in Vermont. Their responsibility would
be to inspect the receivers for dimensional issues. It would probably
follow that the ones with minor issues would be sold to be dealt with
by others. I can't imagine them throwing the ones with little issues in
the scrap bin.

Warbirds Custom Guns
February 16, 2009, 07:51
LRB never inspected receivers in the past. If they are now I'd be surprised.
I was told it takes to long & delays would be the result.
They also told me they lap the receiver lugs to a certain bolt they use on all receivers. If that were true, new bolts would fit much better.

The main problem is with the machine shop & the guy running the mill not paying attention to details.
Not changing cutters as needed or making adjustments for tool wear.

Someone on CSP said that Roland Beaver was the 1rst to tell LRB of some of the problems that existed on their receivers. That's not exactly true because I talked to LOU about 6 months before Roland ever saw a LRB receiver.

A newbie builder says he laps the op-rod to the receiver channel if it's tight.
That's not correct either. That will only remove material from the receiver making for a loose fit in the future.

Lap lap lap seems to be some guys sollution to making parts work.
Lap the rear of the bolt to the receiver too. That's not correct either.
If ya had to replace the bolt for whatever reason, another bolt may not fit.

A new receiver must be properly fitted before any parts are installed.
Custom fitting a receiver to a particular parts set is not correct.
It's not custom work as some claim. It's a requirement & most all USGI parts should fit.
The only exceptions would be new or as new parts because of tight tolerances in a couple areas of the receiver such as the op-rod channel.

If someone says machining is not needed on receivers with serious problems (such as tight mag well) they're simply giving folks wrong info.

As an example: the bolt roller touching the bolt roller cut out on SAI receivers causing bolt roller impact is 1 area. Sure ya can use a dremel tool but, it will look like crap.

Lots of guys simply don't have a machine shop to correctly solve some of these problems & do the work right.

Due to some new builders out there it's a real "buyers beware" kind of market.

At least with Enterprise Arms they were either really good or not good at all.