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litsnsirn
August 01, 2008, 09:07
I saw one of the anniversary S&W model 29's and I have been motivated to seek out a 29, probably a 29-2. I am kind of motivated to pass on the anniversary model because of the built in lock. So I have seen a couple of used examples at dealers for reasonable prices, the problem is that I am not really sure what I should be looking for, never owning a revolver, other than a Nagant. Anyone have some primers, to steer me in the right direction?

rob080650
August 02, 2008, 14:08
Welcome,
This may sound silly; but, treat the notion of the revolver as a tool by deciding what you want to do with it. Personal defense, hunting, safe queen, range time, or as an investment are all possible uses or combinations of uses. Factor in ammo expense or reloading for example. Your line about having never owned a revolver might be the key to starting with a .22. Finally, if possible, shoot with a friend that has some to try out before you buy.
Best,
Rob :)

win308
August 02, 2008, 20:24
Go with a friend and shoot one first. A 44 mag can knock you on your a** and some people handle it ok... and some just don't. I own a 4 inch and a 6 inch S&W 44, and the 6 inch is somewhat easier to tame with factory ammo. My reloads are loaded down to 1000 fps, so either gun is fine with those. If revolvers are new to you, you might also try a full sized .357. You can shoot .38s and .357.....which is a great round. What ever, try before you buy. Find an indoor range that rents guns if you can. Then you know a little better.
629-1
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d1/win308/DSC01030.jpg
29-2
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d1/win308/DSC00952.jpg

L Haney
August 03, 2008, 08:09
Originally posted by win308
Go with a friend and shoot one first. A 44 mag can knock you on your a** and some people handle it ok... and some just don't. SNIP


I've seen this very thing many times. Don't really understand it either. Has nothing to do with the "manliness" of the shooter. I'm guessing the grip on the gun has more to do with it. The typical "target" style grips seem just wrong to me. The largest circumference is exactly where your shortest finger is. ? And I've got large/ long hands. The curve of the back strap leading up to the bottom of the hammer mortise encourages grip rotation in the palm. I've never left those huge blocks of wood on a revolver. I either made my own (lost a whole mahogany bed rail set one summer) or found a replacement set of grips made by people that had actually seen a human hand. If a "hand gun" don't fit YOUR hand, you won't like it, no matter the action type. I really like revolvers, just not that bizarre handle they put on some of them.

Lowell

bykerhd
August 03, 2008, 08:49
I agree with L Haney about the grips.
Factory S & W grips, like in that picture, are just weird to me. I can't see how they fit and work for anybody. That actually shoots with them anyway.

zeke
August 03, 2008, 18:33
along with the above advise, might want to handle some of the different frame sizes. S&W makes j,k,l,N and x frames. Shooting a revolver in doulble action is a lot easier to catch on to, if your hand fits the grip (trigger reach). While i own a number of N-frames, am more accurate with the smaller l-frame.

CRShooter32
August 04, 2008, 13:00
the factory S&W grips seem more for decoration than practical use, the fancy wood grips on my 629, make the revolver look sharp, but they don't feel right, and honestly, the Hogue rubber grips S&W uses aren't the best either. Both my 686, and my 629 sport Pachmyer Decelerators, found them to be the best when it comes to getting the best grip when shooting.

One question, why pass on an anniversary model cause of the internal lock?
Just curious is all.

litsnsirn
August 04, 2008, 17:19
One question, why pass on an anniversary model cause of the internal lock?

Just read enough horror stories to make me not want one.


I might have not been clear enough in my original statement. I was looking for info on things to look for on a specific revolver to know if it was shot out or not. I already know that I want a 29, I am just trying to shop for the best one that I can afford.

CRShooter32
August 05, 2008, 12:31
One thing to look for, make sure the cylinder locks up properly, dry fire it double action, and see if the action locks up after each trigger pull. A friend's model 29 had a worn stop, and wear on the cylinder, preventing proper lock up, cylinder would not stop, and chamber would be way off center of the forcing cone, throwing the timing way off, only way to tell was to dry fire, worn stop also wore at the notches on the cylinder. Repairable, but will cost if the replacement stop needs to be machined to compensate for worn notches.

Did a quick websearch, yesterday, and found the thread on the S&W forum. Couldn't post the edit yesterday, do to the server busy messages.

win308
August 05, 2008, 20:18
Rather than re-invent the wheel, let's try this link:

http://www.thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=57816

charles isaac
August 06, 2008, 10:34
Originally posted by L Haney
...........I've never left those huge blocks of wood on a revolver. I either made my own (lost a whole mahogany bed rail set one summer)...........

:rofl:

lowprone
August 11, 2008, 15:37
For all you guys who can't get used to their wood S&W grips, sell them to me.

Para Driver
August 13, 2008, 11:54
early 629 with pinned and recessed is a great gun.. above information about checking the timing is very good..

Keep in mind that the 44 Mag is probably one of the most abused guns in the marketplace, due to guys hot rodding their hand loads.. the stainless is easy to clean, so you have to be very careful to inspect the timing and cylinder gap.

The Ruger Blackhawks are a stronger frame, and can take hotter loads..

As for recoil, well it's there, not over bearing.. I had my gun mag-na-ported and that made a HUGE difference in the muzzle jump.