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StoneyCreekMrMauser
May 08, 2008, 15:30
Just wondering if anyone makes any revolvers that fire the old .32 S&W/S&W Long cartridges. I don't know if the Ruger Single-Six in .32 H&R can use these.

I bought a bag full of oddball ammo and I'm lookin' to get rid of some.:D

Retired Bum
May 08, 2008, 16:01
The .32 H&R Magnum cartridge was introduced in 1984 and I bought a Ruger SSM (Single Six Magnum) that year. Any .32 Mag chambered revolver will chamber the .32 S&W and the .32 S&W Long AKA the .32 Colt New Police.

If you shoot these shorter rounds in your Ruger, be sure to give the chambers a good brushing out with a bronze bristle brush and solvent as part of the cleaning process. Failure to do so could result in a build up of crud that would prevent chambering the .32 Mag round.

FWIW, in MY Ruger SSM, I can shoot the .32 ACP round as well. The .32 ACP is a semi-rimmed round and although the rim is thinner than that of the revolver rounds, the firing pin hits the primer hard enough to get reliable ignition. The .32 ACP case is identical to the .32 S&W case except for the smaller rim.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

newfalguy101
May 08, 2008, 17:06
The .32 ACP case is identical to the .32 S&W case except for the smaller rim.
well besides the length, taper, and case head size :wink:



Other than that, Retired Bum, pretty well nailed it


the new .327 federal is another stretched hot-rodded .32, that I *think* will chamber all of the shorter rounds


Taurus does, or used to chamber the .32 long, beyond that I cant think of any

gunsmoke
May 08, 2008, 20:00
I've long had an affinity for the .32 SWL. I think it is a very under-rated round. I have two Pre Model 16s a 4 screw and a 5 screw. I also have 2 pre Model 31 Regulation Police, both are 4 screw.

The 4 screw K-32 is unfired and very very rarified so I don't shoot it. But I love shooting tree rats with the 5 screw.

I'm looking for a 'smith to chamber and fit two alternate cylinders for my .30 carbine BlackHawk one in .32-20 the other in the new .327 FedMag so I can shoot the acp, S&W and S & W L as well.

Try the Berry's copper plated HBWC and 2.0 grains of Bullseye in the .32 S&WL.

Retired Bum
May 09, 2008, 10:21
I have one of the "Buckeye Special" Ruger NM Blackhawk .32 Convertibles that was produced back in 1989. Two cylinders came with it. One for the .32-20 WCF and the other for the .32 Magnum.

I bought this revolver because I wanted a .32-20 in my battery. I handload the round and using the Hodgon's #26 manual, I've worked up some fairly warm loads using the Hornady .312" 85 gr XTP and H110 powder. I've chronographed velocities in excess of 1500 fps without pierced primers or ruptured cases. But the .32-20 is a thin walled and weak case compared to the new .327 Federal Magnum. If the .327 Magnum sticks around, I'd love to find a gunsmith who could take the Blackhawk .32 Magnum cylinder and rechamber it for the new cartridge. That way I would in one revolver be capable of shooting every .32 rimmed round available.

I used to have one of the NM Blackhawk 7.5" .30 Carbine revolvers. Never had any luck with it. Chronographed .30 Carbine 110 gr FMJ factory loads gave a very wide velocity spread (over 200 fps) and accuracy from the Ransom Rest was dismal. I worked up various handloads with jacketed and lead bullets for this revolver and never could get an accurate load that would top out over 1200 fps. I can get that kind of velocity using the .32 Mag cartridge in my 6.5" SSM and sub two inch groups at 25 yards.

After acquiring the NM .32 Convertible, I sold off the .30 Carbine NM. This is just my opinion, but I think that it is just too much cartridge in full power form to make it a useful handgun round.

And so it goes.


The Retired One

StoneyCreekMrMauser
May 12, 2008, 20:49
Cool. I'll have to look for a Smith or Ruger next time I'm making the fun shop rounds. Looks like it'd be a good bunny popper caliber. Thanks a bunch!

dirtyrice
May 12, 2008, 21:13
You could just purchase an old colt police positive. They're cheap and plentiful on gunbroker and such. Neat little pistol too considering a large amount of police forces used them in the early 1900's before switching to the .38 revolvers.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/whitearican/pp322.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v366/whitearican/pp323.jpg

doesn't hurt that it's a colt. The only colt I own. This particular one has been in my family since it was originally sold in the 20's . Still shoots to the standards there were made to meet also. Trigger control matters alot with these little pistols i've noticed. I'd never use it for defense unless I had no other choice though due to the power of the caliber.

gunsmoke
May 13, 2008, 10:00
Originally posted by dirtyrice


You could just purchase an old colt police positive. They're cheap and plentiful on gunbroker and such. Neat little pistol too considering a large amount of police forces used them in the early 1900's before switching to the .38 revolvers.




I agree, there is a nice little S & W Regulation Police .32 SWL on AuctionArms from the same era right now.

They are dirt cheap to handload for, the brass lasts forever, #0 buck and 1.5-2.0 of BULLSEYE can be used for round ball loads, bullets can be cast from wheelweights, at these pressures and velocities you don't need linotype or to heat-treat your cast bullets.

As far as defensive use is concerned, no, I'd rather grab a BENELLI, but I wouldn't stand still and let anyone shoot at me with a .32 either.

BUFF
May 13, 2008, 14:27
One spring, back in 1975 or so, I was in college and working nights as a printer. Times got slow and the plant closed for a couple of months. While I had school to keep me busy, I still needed some cheap recreation.

I was paying 50 cents for 100 primers, and 8 bucks a pound for Bullseye powder. I had a ton of free wheelweights and linotype we had phased out at work. Using a Lyman 115 grain SWC mould, I was loading .32 S&W Long for a bit less than I could buy .22 LR for.

I had found a nice S&W Model 32 with a 4 inch barrel. I learned a lot about shooting a lightweight revolver double action that spring!

Of course, cast 148 grain wadcutters for my .38's weren't that much more expensive to cast and load... nor were the 250 grainers for my .44 Specials and Magnums... but I digress, this thread is about .32's!

Temp
May 20, 2008, 18:27
I always like the threads which inquire about .32 long revolvers.

They're an aquired taste,.... like a Ketel One Martini,..neat, on ice with olives.

One of those tiny, early 20th century Colt or S&W .32 long revolvers will become one of your most prized possesions.

I've described them before as masculine jewelry. I find them to be much more satisfying than a Rolex,... and much easier on the wallet.

http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h225/FalMike/positive.jpg

gunsmoke
May 20, 2008, 19:36
Originally posted by Temp


I always like the threads which inquire about .32 long revolvers.

They're an aquired taste,.... like a Ketel One Martini,..neat, on ice with olives.

One of those tiny, early 20th century Colt or S&W .32 long revolvers will become one of your most prized possesions.

I've described them before as masculine jewelry. I find them to be much more satisfying than a Rolex,... and much easier on the wallet.

http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h225/FalMike/positive.jpg

Beautiful little Colt! Is it a Police Positive?

I have a friend who has a 5" PP in .32 NP. (I've never seen another in 5") Its got the NOPD star and crescent on the right side and "New Orleans Ploice Department" engraved in script on the backstrap. It is near mint.

Shoots every bit as nice as my 5 screw K-32 and pre-31s.

dogngun
May 22, 2008, 08:24
H&R made a lot of .32 long revolvers, many still in great condition dirt cheap. Not as goodlooking as the S&W or Colt, but they are very rugged and inexpensive revolvers.

FWIW, .32's were THE police caliber in the US for many years. The Hearst papers started anti Chinese and anti black editorial campaigns, and began calling for larger caliber handguns because the .32 was not enough gun against drug-crazed minorities. .38 Specials began to replace the .32's in most large cities, and eventually became the top police revolvers for decades.
IIRC you can fire these calibers in Nagant revolvers but it really screws up the cases.

mark

I also like the .32 ACP, John Browning's first cartridge design, and still in my pocket today.

gunsmoke
May 22, 2008, 09:10
One of the reasons you see so many early-20th Century S & W hand ejectors in .32-20 and quite a few Colt DA Armys in .32-20 is that when Theodore Roosevelt became Commissioner of Police in NYC he standardized an issue service revolver for the first time in the NYPD. It was the Hand Ejector in .32-20.

People don't understand that in the day, the finest health care system in the world was not a 911 call away. Getting shot was nearly a death sentence. IF you had access to a Doctor getting shot in an arm or leg meant almost certain amputation. It was the accepted therapy quick, dirty, and the best way to avoid dealing with an infection.

There was not nearly as much emphasis on knock-down as there came with the advent of modern surgical techniques, anti-biotics, etc.

Even as late as the 20's and 30's the big emphasis remained weight of the weapon. This is where the S & W Regulation Police came from and Colt Police Positive. Cops walked a beat in urban areas and carrying a small-frame revolver on foot all day was better than lugging around the weight of a larger handgun.

The rural setting was different and the larger handguns, shotguns, and rifles were the norm for peace officer carry. The advent of State Police organizations came with Highways and helped to keep the rural traditions alive.

As late as 1952-53 the Colt New Service in .45 Colt was the standard issue revolver for the NYSP. When they switched to the Colt .357 Magnum and Colt and S & W danced in court over the trademark infringement. That Colt ".357 Magnum later evolved into the Python.

For most of the life of the Louisiana State Police the issue revolver was the Colt New Army in .41 LDA (.41 colt with inside lubricated 200 gr bullet referred to as the Long Double Action) Although 1911s and 1911ais in either .45 or .38 Super were popular individual carry guns.

It really was not until after WWII and the experiences of prohibition era gangs that Urban Police forces started transitioning to the larger bore revolvers.

Temp
May 22, 2008, 20:53
Originally posted by gunsmoke
This is where the S & W Regulation Police came from

Yeah,.. I like those also.

Here's one in .38 S&W from the first year of production. Note the absense of the S&W logo on the frame. They started putting that on there later.


http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h225/FalMike/MVC-027S.jpg

Temp
May 22, 2008, 21:00
Originally posted by gunsmoke

For most of the life of the Louisiana State Police the issue revolver was the Colt New Army in .41 LDA (.41 colt with inside lubricated 200 gr bullet referred to as the Long Double Action)

Not a New Army,.. but an Army Special in .41 Colt,.. from 1920.

http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h225/FalMike/41jpg.jpg

gunsmoke
May 22, 2008, 23:04
My mistake it was NOT the New Army it was the ARMY SPECIAL as pictured.

During WWII the ranks of LASP were greatly enlarged and they were provided for security for the large camps of POWs who were brought in to do farm work and for security at vital industries and the Port facilities.

My dad had a cousin who worked for them. He was issued three guns, Colt Army Special in .41 LDA, Winchester Mdl. 12 trench gun, and an 07 Winchester in .351. His son still has the .41 and the .351. He would ride point on horseback when they would march POWs from the camps to the farms where they would work. And stand guard while they worked.

My maternal grandfather retired from the NOFD as a Dep Chief and joined LASP at the outbreak of WWII, as a Captain and ran the LASP security deal at the Higgins Boat Works where the Landing Craft were built. He was issued two guns, a .41 Army Special and a 1928 overstamped Thompson. But he carried a personal 1917 S & W on duty. He carried the .41 and sometimes a 4" nickled S & W .32 Regulation Police off duty which was a long-time personal gun that he regularly carried concealed while he was with NOFD. His brother was a Captain in NOPD and he carried a pair of 1911s. He ran the District that included the French Quarter in the 1920s and first 3/4s of the '30s.

Interestingly for all the Falaholics, in the early 1960s LASP bought over 100 G receivers from Browning. I have a photograph somewhere around here of 100 State Troopers standing on the capitol steps holding the FALs at port arms. If I can find it I'll scan it and post it.

Some of the troopers sent to N.O. following KATRINA slung some of those FALs.

In 1992, I turned down a chance to buy a VERY nice near mint 4" Army Special in .41.

$225 asking price, when I came to my senses three days later I went back to the Pawn shop and it was gone.

davesrb
June 16, 2008, 15:41
Did someone say S&W hand ejector? Like this little one?
http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w119/davesrb/all%20guns/DSC00104Small.jpg
http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w119/davesrb/all%20guns/DSC00102LargeSmall.jpg

Davesrb

Gazz
July 09, 2008, 09:26
The Colt revolver that was issued to NYC police in 1896 was not in 32-20 caliber. It was .32 Colt New Police or .32 Colt (long or short). The revolver was introduced in 1896 with TR getting sn #1. Production ceased in 1907. In 1908, Colt introduced the Police Positive Special revolver in the more powerful 32-20 as well as other .32 calibers and .38 caliber inclucing .38S&W special and the now obsolete .38-44 S&W target round. These revolvers were in production until 1970!

whirlibird
July 09, 2008, 23:42
Used to have a trio of the '80's vintage M-16's in .32 Mag.

The 8 3/8" was a tackdriver and purely recoiless and recorded my personal worst overload. Made a muck-up and forgot to change the seater setting going from LSWC's to LWC's and ended up with a really compressed load of 2400 in 6 cases that I was firing through the chronograph.

Let's just say that the load oversteps the .327 Mag by quite a bit.

The 6" and 4" versions were fun and way too heavy for a trail-gun of limited power. The 4" got punched out to .32-20 chambers to pair with a Marlin Classic also in the .32-20 chambering. Funky two-shoulder chamber but very effective.

Got rid of them all over the years, but for the cash I could sell them for today, I can't say that I really miss them. But an old Colt Police Positive or Detective Special, that would be fun to have again. (kicking myself repeatedly)