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Scott S
February 13, 2001, 04:03
While trying to diagnose a feeding problem I removed the recoil springs from the tube to give it the once over. When I reinstalled the springs I gave them a fairly generous coating of BreakFree CLP. Anyone recommend a different lubricant for the spring tube? I read in an archived post that someone recommended grease. Seconds on that recommendation?

[ September 10, 2001: Message edited by: gary.jeter ]

ce
February 13, 2001, 11:37
Teflon lubes like Breakfree are probably superior. Grease is good, but if you put too much it will effect a hydrostatic seal and retard the rearward travel of the bolt and cause malfunction.
K-Y jelly and other intimate lubricants, while indeed superior, are not as durable, and thus require repeated application.

W.E.G.
February 13, 2001, 17:23
I use Tetra grease.

Rayman
February 13, 2001, 17:24
I use Gunslick a little goes a long way. It is a small tube of graphite in a very light grease. Stays well and does not form a seal like oils. Rick in Fl

EMDII
February 13, 2001, 19:33
I agree w/ Tetra, a SMALL amount. Generous CLP is NOT appropriate.

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1*.....Train Like You Fight: Second Place is NOT an Option.

E.M. (Ted) Dannemiller II

[This message has been edited by EMDII (edited February 13, 2001).]

MG-70
February 14, 2001, 05:22
I remember someone recommending synthetic motor oil but I can't confirm.

Does anyone remember the thread? Application and weight of the oil?

Thanks,
MG-70

gunnut1
February 14, 2001, 13:15
Why is CLP not accepticable?

jim123sts
February 14, 2001, 16:18
Originally posted by gunnut1:
Why is CLP not accepticable?
CLP isnt bad, my biggest complaint with CLP is it is a dirt magnet and collects alot of powder residue. I have been trying a oil from Castrol I picked up about a month ago and even in an AR-15 after about 100rds the bolt and receiver look better than only 20 if I had been using CLP.

AR-45ACP
February 14, 2001, 16:32
I usually use CAT dry film lubricant (graphite)on everything gas system too.

Scott S
February 15, 2001, 05:04
I appreciate the replies. I suspected that my question would prompt a variety of replies; of course, I was hoping that 20 folks would recommend the same type of lube. Wishful thinking. I suppose that in the grand scheme of things the type of lube doesn't matter as much as keeping the gun cleaned and lubed. It's just difficult to sleep well at night when you aren't sure whether your pride and joy has the best lube money can buy.

jim123sts
February 16, 2001, 22:53
Originally posted by Scott S:
I appreciate the replies. I suspected that my question would prompt a variety of replies; of course, I was hoping that 20 folks would recommend the same type of lube. Wishful thinking. I suppose that in the grand scheme of things the type of lube doesn't matter as much as keeping the gun cleaned and lubed. It's just difficult to sleep well at night when you aren't sure whether your pride and joy has the best lube money can buy.
You got that right dude. Kind of like 6 of one or half a dozen of another.

Wadman
February 17, 2001, 04:01
It's true that you got a lot of replies but all you have to do is cull out the pertinent details. What I got out of the responses were to avoid lubes that attract dirt, don't last, and don't overlube. Tetra was preferred in more than one response and also some motor oils may work.

Charmedlyfe
February 17, 2001, 12:57
I like Eezox. spray it in, it dries into a dry lube, no dirt magnet. It is an excellent lube, on par with tetra, just not messy. I used tetra exclusively until i discovered Eezox.

Ape
February 17, 2001, 18:26
I like tetra too. Who carries the Eezox? Haven't heard of that one.

NZ L1A1 Collector
February 17, 2001, 23:03
Australian & British regulations for the L1A1 state that the armourers should use only a light application of Graphite Grease XG340.

------------------
Kevin Adams
Rifle, 7.62 mm, L1A1 Collector & Researcher.
NEW ZEALAND

JimM
February 18, 2001, 11:18
I use Kroil spray and very little of it. Kroil rules!

------------------
Jim M
PCS, Inc.
Industrial Metal Coating
Industrial Metal Coating (http://frontpage.webzone.net/jimm/imc_home.htm)
jimm@webzone.net
Protect the Second Amendment!!!

W.E.G.
September 10, 2001, 21:21
moved to FAQ

ktmullens
September 11, 2001, 03:41
I can vouch for Kevin Adams previous reply, I am an ex-Australian army trooper and thats what we were required to use. However I have successfully used CLP and also I have had pretty good luck (amazingly enough) with slick 50 motor oil. I have found that the best thing with the slick 50 (or similar products) is to get to your tube while it is in pristine condition (new or just bloody well cleaned) and give it a good soak in the oil. Then let it dry, wipe off the residue and then just use some decent gun oil on top of it. The slick 50 mainly helps to aide in removing gunk buildup and generally helps cleaning.
:)

[ September 11, 2001: Message edited by: Kevin M ]

falup
September 12, 2001, 22:10
http://www.cole-distributing.com/guncare.html
Check out the above link.They have detailed
descriptions of several purpose specific
products from CLP.It's all new to me.
If the link doesn't work just go to :
cole-distributing.com & click on; Gun Care Products.

Blag
September 12, 2001, 23:08
Originally posted by Ape:
... Who carries the Eezox? Haven't heard of that one.

Eezox must be the stuff at www.eezox.com (http://www.eezox.com)
Described as a synthetic all-in-one product: C, L, &P.

I like oil on springs, because I trust it more than grease to prevent rust. Oil spreads and covers a surface better than grease. But I'm not gonna fight over it.

Buk
September 13, 2001, 13:45
STP!

LVACGAR
September 15, 2001, 11:21
Interesting and informative responses. I've tried a lot of different products but seem to come back to CLP. It can attract powder residue but if you use it from the start it cleans quite easily. Even a heavily soiled firearm can be soaked in a generous coating and scrubbed the next day with banner results.

I have a good quantity of tetra grease I got from a "group buy" on the crffl list a couple years ago. Several people had problems with rust when using it as a "preservative" for long term storage. Hygroscopic? I never passed judgement since a board member bought a huge drum and repacked it for individual use. I was in the habit of lightly applying tetra grease to slide rails and areas of heavy friction or metal impact just before going to the range, and cleaning exclusively with CLP before storage. I really like tetra grease and thought that the combo of tetra oil and grease would be superb, but it is expensive in the quantities used. CLP is effective and quite economical in quantity.

I suspect the reason Slick 50 works well is the teflon content, similar to CLP. I wonder if it has more than CLP? If you can believe the ad hype about the teflon filling the metal pores. I've had tremendous results with Slick 50 back when I maintained older vehicles. CLP has worked for me since boot camp, and after 17 years it is very hard to plunk down cash to try new stuff. It has worked well on my hand and garden tools as well.

The graphite lube seems to warrant exploration given it's military heritage, although I wonder if the teflon lubes were in existance then?

CZ
September 15, 2001, 15:45
I mainly use a high quality Teflon lube. It's called tefoil and made by Applied. It's extremely sticky but not some kind of dirtmagnet.....super slick and a very good anti rust preservative!

Teflon based oils are good in general.....I like the more thicker lubricants instead of those extremely thin Teflon based lubricants.

Hopes this helps.....
CZ

koponen
March 09, 2011, 15:54
For low temperatures I use only graphite. By low I mean below zero. Coldest shots I fired this winter were @-25F, and all oil based lubricants were very, very sticky at that point.

Apply only after cleaning the part(s) bone dry. You would not want graphite+oil+dirt+powder goo all over the place.