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cm2037
October 09, 2000, 14:30
South African butt stocks are made of? I'm refinishing mine as I write this and don't know if it's walnut, teak, oak or what. Whatever it is, it's hard as a rock. I called Hesse and found out their wood pistolgrip is walnut. I'll get the Izzy forend (anybody know what kind of wood that is?), and then try to get a stain that will match everything up.

ByronF
October 09, 2000, 15:00
My Izzy HB furiture kit was oak. Regular stain looked like crap on it, so I used Chestnut Ridge Military Stock Stain. It certainly looks better than the original yellow poly, IMO.

Byron

orca
October 09, 2000, 15:19
Bryon, It looks like oak, but is a little oily....I was told it was either gopher or shittum wood (like in the Bible) Heh heh, orca

ByronF
October 09, 2000, 15:31
No shittum? I could've sworn that was oak. Wow, all of the sudden my mutt has exotic furniture. By the way, mines a lot oily now. Boiled linseed oily.

Byron

Farmer from Hell
October 09, 2000, 16:09
I have gotten two types of wood in my kits. One that was obviously walnut from its tight dark wood and two that are a very like wood that have a straight uniform grain. The walnut turned out fine with straight tung oil. The lighter wood I mixed the walnut stain that GP rcommended with tung oil 50/50. That seemed to have worked ok. The first one was a little less stain and turned out a little better I think. I just sanded them down through 400 grit then applied the oil/stain then wet sanded with 600 grit to seal up the small pores. That worked pretty good and I like the tung oil better then BLO because it was dry enough to handle in a few minutes but other things that I have used BLO one took forever to dry. I then gave them a coating of finishing wax and they look sharp now. Hope that wasnt too much 411.


FfH http://smilecwm.tripod.com/net6/scene.gif

cm2037
October 10, 2000, 10:36
Thanx for your input fellas. The Izzy forend being gopher (what Noahs Ark was made of) or Shittim (What the Ark Of The Covenent was made of) makes sense since the region is about the same. The South African buttstock still has me wondering. Mine is blonde at the front, then has a couple of very dark stripes about half way down and then remains pretty dark all the way to the buttpad with some grain showing through. Do you think it's some kind of South African walnut? Maybe the wood was imported in and finished in South Africa. Anybody know for sure?

GDYankee
October 10, 2000, 11:13
You really cannot be certain of foreign wood because of the likelihood that local exotic woods were used to manufacture or to replace broken stocks. For the southern half of Africa, we're talking literally dozens of possible woods. Often distributors or mills do not even know the precise wood as independent companies may harvest large quantities of everything on a piece of land and sell it in bulk lots. Unless they are uniquely valuable wood varieties, procedures can get lax about identification.

My R1 stock has an oak appearence but seems more dense than American or English oak.

As for refinishing, this is the usual can of worms. BLO is a traditional USGI finish but simply inferior (tackier and thicker) compared to tung or lemon (mineral) oil. BTW, wet sanding does not "fill the grain" -- that is an old wives tale. What you get is wood with a sawdust/oil mixture on it. Grain is "closed" by progressively fine dry sanding followed by repeated hand rubbed oil finishes.

cm2037
October 10, 2000, 14:43
GDYankee, I think you got it right on the head. I suspected it might be a type of oak because of how hard and dense it is. I raised all the dents and scratches with the wet rag/hot iron technique, sanded with progressively finer papers and finished it off with a fine steel wool last nite. The steel wool really brought the grain out and it looks pretty darn good for being regular gov't issue wood. I'll just finish it off with tung oil and enjoy. Now all I have to do is find the Izzy handguards for the light or standard barrel. Any ideas where I can find one of those? Thanks again for all your help guys. My first STG was a "learn how to put it together" excercise. This one is a "pride of ownership" deal. I'm a falcoholic but I can stop anytime I want to, really I can.

jaygee
August 13, 2004, 17:17
back in the late ' 80s, i was at a gun show in columbus, ohio (OGCA.) and

came across a big box of FAL. rifle hardwood butts. most were fairly

common stuff, but one in particular was not only in excellent shape, but

had a most fantastic color and figure; overall pale blond, like some

types of birch, with a couple of thin stripes with the grain, one almost

black, and the other a deep red. the wood is very tight grained and

dense. the pattern was that of a 50.00 late model with front ferrule,

and 360 rear swivel. it was not cored out for a trapped buttplate. one

individual later told me that he thought it was bubinga, an african native

wood, which i suppose is possible, given the FAL.s extensive use in that

neck of the woods.

EdgarM
May 29, 2006, 12:51
I have several sets of Isreali stocks, both new and used, and all are European Beech.
Beautiful hard wood and also used on my Swiss K31s.

Edgar

ftierson
May 29, 2006, 13:00
Originally posted by EdgarM
I have several sets of Isreali stocks, both new and used, and all are European Beech.
Beautiful hard wood and also used on my Swiss K31s.

Edgar

I have a couple of sets of Israeli HB handguards that are made out of Beech (presumably European Beech), too...

I leave them naturally light with no stain...

Forrest

MACV
June 29, 2006, 13:51
Two tall trees, a birch and a beech, are growing in the woods. A
small tree begins to grow between them, and the beech says to the
birch, "Is that a son of a beech or a son of a birch?" The birch says he
cannot tell. Just then a woodpecker lands on the sapling.
The birch says, "Woodpecker, you are a tree expert. Can you tell if
that is a son of a beech or a son of a birch?" The woodpecker takes a
taste of the small tree. He replies, "It is neither a son of a beech nor a
son
of a birch. It is, however, the best piece of ash I have ever put my pecker
in."