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View Full Version : Lubrication: Gas system- yes or no?


W.E.G.
January 23, 2001, 12:39
Don't do it.

This thread is intended to be a spin-off of the discussion that got started deep into the IAI-444 thread.

I think everybody will agree that it would be idiotic to try to lubricate any system that functions via application of blazing-hot, high-pressure gasses.

Still, this does NOT mean you can't wipe the surfaces with a thin film of oil to prevent rust. Yes, you will get a small amount of extra smoke on the first two or three shots. But, it sure as hell won't hurt anything, and it it WILL keep your gas system from rusting. Given the choice between rust and smoke, I'll take the smoke.

I fired M14 and M1A rifles in competition for several years. I always put a little film of WD40 or Break-Free on the gas piston, gas plug and gas tube. I never had any problems as a result.

The same applies for the AR15. The rear area of the bolt and the internal part of the bolt carrier are part of the AR15 gas system. I always coat those parts with a thin film of Break-Free during cleaning. And I always get a little extra smoke on the first few shots. This is more of an annoyance with the AR15 than the M14, as the smoke is generated closer to the shooter's face, and it tends to waft out around the rear sight. If you are just firing one shot, then putting the rifle down, there is no problem. But, if you have to get your head down, and roar through a whole magazine, the smoke can irritate your aiming eye. This is why we make sure we run the AR15's with a dry rear-area bolt during the National Trophy Infantry Team events.

But, back to the FAL. I noticed a small amount of smoke from the forward end of the gas system for the first few shots during my last range trip. Certainly the film of oil from the piston and inside the tube was the source. A magazine and a half later the oil from the OUTSIDE of the gas tube started to cook-off in a most impressive cloud of smoke.

Ideally, you would never put any oil in the gas system areas. Better to just wipe down these surfaces with a clean cloth to remove the loose stuff. That would be the preferred method if you have the opportunity to field-strip and inspect your semiauto collection every day. But, for the rest of us, the adhered stuff (carbon) will attract moisture if the rifle is stored in an area with any humidity. I remember a Mini-14 gas system that just looked terrible (rust) after being stored for no more than a month after not oiling-down the gas system after a range trip. I've seen the same thing with Remington 7400's.

I hate it when my guns rust due to my neglect. You cannot lubricate a gas system. But, neither do you have to allow it to rust.

bullsear
January 23, 2001, 13:23
I usually wipe the gas system parts down with some silicon spray lube. When the carrier evaporates it leaves it good and slick, and appears to offer some rust protection without leaving any oil in the way. Seems to work good on machine tools and my table saw that has a cast iron top also.
just my .02.
bullsear

warlord
January 23, 2001, 13:23
I have used some of those high-temp lubricants, such as Tetra-lube for lubiricating the internal bore of the barrels, they seem to work okay for me in the gas system that is subjected to high temps.

KG
January 23, 2001, 14:03
So far the Tetra-Lube treatment has worked for me. I started using it in the bore of a 1911 that I shot alot of lead wad-cutter with. It helped reduce the fouling. I then moved to using it on gas systems, first the M1s and then the FAL. I use a light coat and wipe off the visible residue. It really seems to help with future cleaning.

Anybody else have a product they like?

W.E.G.
January 23, 2001, 14:54
I like Tetra too. I don't use Tetra oil that much because I have a penchant for aerosols. I mainly use the Tetra grease. Tetra doesn't come in aerosol as far as I know.

But, I'll try some Tetra oil on my gas system after the next range outing to see what happens on the subsequent trip with regard to smoke.

Kiwibru
January 23, 2001, 16:30
The Tetra Grease works very well. I use a very light coating, especially where the Gas piston goes through the receiver. The stuff resists that high heat bake off and makes the gas residue very easy to clean off. Also great stuff for the receiver slide area of the bolt, firing pin and bolt receiver/slide.

CC
January 23, 2001, 18:31
When I first got an AK-47. Many people told me to never lube the gas system. I didn't and it rusted. The gas piston never did rust just the gas tube. I started to look at the rifles of the guys that told me never to lube the gas system. Thats right, they were rusted too. I experimented on a Mak-90 by puting a light coat of oil on the gas system. I never had any problems, and don't have any rust either. Now on my FAL's gas system, I put a very lite coat of Militech-1 oil. The thing I like about this oil is the way the carbon just wipes off. I wonder if the guys that don't use any oil in their gas systems, had a bad experence by either useing too much, or a type that gummed up the system. Oh well, a very lite coat seems to work just fine for me...CC

Arado
January 23, 2001, 18:53
I use an industrial release agent..It has proprietary ingredients. It is used in casting and wax investments. No smoke, no rust, cleanup is just a wipe.... Gary

F4GIB
January 23, 2001, 20:01
Try the lube they make for shotgun choke tubes.

SLT556
January 23, 2001, 20:08
And would you be so kind to tell us where we can get this industrial release agent?

[This message has been edited by SLT556 (edited January 23, 2001).]

W.E.G.
January 23, 2001, 20:37
Originally posted by Arado:
...cleanup is just a wipe....

"I am Wile-E-holio...I need TP for my..."

;-)

Sylvan
February 21, 2003, 14:16
5W30 mobil 1 synthetic. Handles heat quite well.

EMDII
February 21, 2003, 16:07
- The FN and other OEM manuals (and Troop manuals) ALL said NONE.
- No synthetics were in general military use at that time
- IF you find that synthetics work for you, apply a VERY light amount.

I shoot dry.

recce
February 22, 2003, 11:57
I know it states in C-71-113-000 that lubricants are not to be used in the gas system.

How ever in CFP 317 (2) (IIRC, I donated my copy and have not yet replaced it) It said that the gas affected parts were to be cleaned with CLP and left with a light coat for storage.

In cleaning before firing and field cleaning, all gas affected parts including the face of the B.B. were to be dried.

This is how we were taught to do it and it worked fine. For those who don't want oil in there at all, you could clean with Hoppes No 9 and leave a thin film to protect the gas block and tube.

hkshooter
February 23, 2003, 12:05
I don't oil gas systems either. But I do protect them with a good metalpholic oil such as Beeman's MP5 oil or Sheath. Metal WILL NOT rust with this stuff on it and the oil only leaves a very minute amount of film. The stuff is great for neutralizing finger print acids also and I've never had a gun corrode that i've shot corrosive ammo in and just oiled with the stuff.

d745
February 24, 2003, 06:00
I was reading this post and havenít touched my fal in about a month. I decided to check the gas system. The gas plug wouldnít turn with hand pressure. Put a few drops of oil around it and removed it. There was a light coating of rust in the gas tube. Thoroughly cleaned the tube, rod and plug and coated lightly with oil. I donít care if it smokes for a few rounds but I donít want rust. Thanks Gary for the reminder. I try to take care of my fal but I am learning something all the time. Here in Florida the humidity is high and a dry gas system is asking for rust.

W.E.G.
February 24, 2003, 08:35
Originally posted by EMDII
- The FN and other OEM manuals (and Troop manuals) ALL said NONE.

No doubt because if they recommended ANY, some doofus would use a LOT (like a handful of wheel-bearing grease), and the rifle wouldn't work at all. You gotta remember that INSTRUCTION MANUALS are typically oriented toward the LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR.

Next time you wanna insult somebody without swearing, call 'em a "denominator."

19 Delta
February 24, 2003, 17:26
I use a tip from the Army M1 Garand manual. After I clean the gas system with CLP, I use a very light film of issue grease. This prevents carbon buildup, and makes it easier to clean.

I didnt use to do this at all until I saw the gas sytem on my izzy after never lubing or cleaning it

SLoV
February 24, 2003, 18:54
Originally posted by gary.jeter


No doubt because if they recommended ANY, some doofus would use a LOT (like a handful of wheel-bearing grease), and the rifle wouldn't work at all. You gotta remember that INSTRUCTION MANUALS are typically oriented toward the LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR.

Next time you wanna insult somebody without swearing, call 'em a "denominator."


LOL dremel you kill me

but yeah some Bubba would put a pump of Penzoil marine grease in there, you are right

Stranger
February 25, 2003, 09:16
Originally posted by gary.jeter
No doubt because if they recommended ANY, some doofus would use a LOT (like a handful of wheel-bearing grease)

What? You mean you don't have the gas plug that doubles as a zerk? Just a few pumps of Wal-mart grade lithium and I'm ready to go. ;)

floatingFAL
February 25, 2003, 12:44
My Galil manual says oil the cylinder.I do,no problem.
Ryan

Mosin Guy
February 25, 2003, 13:02
With all this talk of oiling or not oiling the gas system I was wondering if anyone had tried any of the Dry Lube style spray on coatings in there gas system or on there gas pistons,I personaly use Balistoil on my gas system and parts and its the cat ass as far as I'am concerned.HTH

ltcboy
April 25, 2003, 22:15
"I fired M14 and M1A rifles in competition for several years. I always put a little film of WD40 or Break-Free on the gas piston, gas plug and gas tube. I never had any problems as a result."




Just to let you know- WD-40 actually causes parts to rust after long periods of time. I would not recomennd using it on any firearm.

EMDII
April 26, 2003, 05:27
Originally posted by gary.jeter
Next time you wanna insult somebody without swearing, call 'em a "denominator."

:rofl:

Generally speaking, Competition rifles do NOT see the abuse field/troop rifles do. I can imagine that a little lube makes cleanup a bit easier.

Now go carry your M1 from D-Day to VE day, or from Tarawa to Tokyo, and imagine what cleaning might have occurred at the battle of the Bulge (absolutely the WORST ETO weather imaginable) or on Okinawa, where our troops fought for weeks in miserable conditions. Then, the wrong application of lube could be a serious problem.

The FAL manual was based on known lube properties of the time. We've made startling improvements. If you MUST lube yours pistons on FAL rifles, do so sparingly.

Treat yours as you wish, but there is a reason that Dieudonne and his staff made the 'no oil' recommendation.

And don't use denominators, er, lube, too heavily on your piston.

cadillac
April 26, 2003, 08:16
Originally posted by gary.jeter
I like Tetra too. I don't use Tetra oil that much because I have a penchant for aerosols. I mainly use the Tetra grease. Tetra doesn't come in aerosol as far as I know.

Gary - check this out Tetra spray cleaner & lube (http://www.firearmservice.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/page23.html)

cadillac
April 26, 2003, 08:25
And I do use a light film of CLP, Sheath, or corrosisionX in/on the FAL gas system to prevent rust DURING STORAGE. But I always wipe the gas system clean/dry before use.

W.E.G.
April 26, 2003, 08:32
Thanks for the link John!

EMDII
April 26, 2003, 09:32
Tetra are good stuff, and what I use for storage nad lube (grease on the moving parts).

MartinS
May 16, 2003, 20:51
On the AK, clean the tube and piston with Ed's Red and leave some on them.
The translation of a Soviet AK manual says to clean everything with a rag dipped in oil, don't remember anything about drying off the gas system afterwards.

B. B. Ryan
June 16, 2003, 15:47
Originally posted by MartinS
On the AK, clean the tube and piston with Ed's Red and leave some on them.
The translation of a Soviet AK manual says to clean everything with a rag dipped in oil, don't remember anything about drying off the gas system afterwards.


Hi:

It would amaze most people how the AK family was/is maintained by the Russians in the field during the past 14 years and how these long guns continue to work very well.

What a system.

BB Ryan

BRAD3
May 12, 2008, 19:34
its stupid not to lube the gas piston and spring,,,use a full syn mtr oil,i prefer 10/30 and up.you can leave it wet if you want,it will NEVER stop the rifle from working,syn oil for the most part wont burn,,,syn oils move towards heat! i use syn oils/mtr oil ever ywhere . all other oils,silicone,burn and leave nasty film,NEVER USE WD 40!!!!!!

ALL the dirt and carbon will wipe off easy also.

im combat i would use syn oil but wipe everything off aftercoating,,,thats another story,,,,99 percent of us arnt seeing combat

i use only just enough on my rifles,,,you could leave it soaked and the rifle will NEVER stop,,,you can spend all ya want on wizbang oils,go ahead,,ill use mobil 1

try it guys,,youll love it and nothing will ever wear out




scumbags dont worry about laws/breaking them,,,,,so in our country we try and take guns from honest people??,,,it might be 50 to a hundred years from now but someday the honest gun owners will have to revolt to keep and bear arms
the scumbags never went without them.................. brad

granite
September 10, 2008, 10:40
I didn't oil the gas cylinder once, (laziness, or a vague belief in the "dry" theory).

I later found that the adjustment nut had frozen, with rust on the inside and outside (near the vent holes) of the gas tube.

When I looked at the FN manual online, I noticed that there were TWO official manuals.

One, (I assume the older one), talked about cleaning with hot soapy water if using corrosive primers, and said to run a lightly oiled rag through the gas cylinder. It had a table of what should be oiled (breech block, slide groove, etc.), and what should be "left dry" (includes chamber and gas cylinder).

The other (I assume, newer manual) which doesn't discuss cleaning after corrosive ammo, says, "Clean the gas cylinder and wipe with a slightly oiled rag".

The table in this manual has different headings. Instead of "left dry", it has, "Components which will not be oiled before firing". This seems to make the intent clearer. The gas system does NOT need oil to function. It DOES need oil (light layer) after cleaning to prevent corrosion.

The phrase, "left dry", seems to have caused confusion to others besides myself. It doesn't mean don't oil it. It does mean, after oiling, clean excess oil off with a dry patch.

panzer
September 11, 2008, 21:30
Originally posted by Mosin Guy
With all this talk of oiling or not oiling the gas system I was wondering if anyone had tried any of the Dry Lube style spray on coatings in there gas system or on there gas pistons,I personaly use Balistoil on my gas system and parts and its the cat ass as far as I'am concerned.HTH

Yes it is. I use it on every firearm I own and every part. Use it around the house alot too, and it kills ants in seconds. and is safe.

Lee Carpentieri
November 01, 2008, 02:35
I switch years ago from LSA military weapons oil to Tetra and have never looked back. I live down in SE Florida along the coast, And when you have high heat and humidity along with salt in the air and with the fact alot of us shoot ammo with corrsive primers as in berdan primered ammo along with the fact that you really don't know what kind of gun powder was used in the manufacturing of the surplus off shore ammo being sold and used by alot of us, It's highly advisable to clean and lube your whole weapon after usage as a preventive maintance measure to insure it will work the next time you need it.

liftstationman
January 11, 2009, 23:12
Originally posted by BRAD3
its stupid not to lube the gas piston and spring,,,use a full syn mtr oil,i prefer 10/30 and up.you can leave it wet if you want,it will NEVER stop the rifle from working,syn oil for the most part wont burn,,,syn oils move towards heat! i use syn oils/mtr oil ever ywhere . all other oils,silicone,burn and leave nasty film,NEVER USE WD 40!!!!!!

ALL the dirt and carbon will wipe off easy also.

im combat i would use syn oil but wipe everything off aftercoating,,,thats another story,,,,99 percent of us arnt seeing combat

i use only just enough on my rifles,,,you could leave it soaked and the rifle will NEVER stop,,,you can spend all ya want on wizbang oils,go ahead,,ill use mobil 1

try it guys,,youll love it and nothing will ever wear out




scumbags dont worry about laws/breaking them,,,,,so in our country we try and take guns from honest people??,,,it might be 50 to a hundred years from now but someday the honest gun owners will have to revolt to keep and bear arms
the scumbags never went without them.................. brad


wow! i got the idea for synthetic motor oil from rimfirecentral.com.
the forum ran a thread on the big P.R. concerning gun specific oils.
i started using wally world super tech syn 10w30 about three years ago and noticed a tremendeous change in the slickness of my bolt guns and semi's.
he!!, a $2.50 quart will last years! i used it on the gas system on my SKS and have my fal lubed with it now. this stuff's the bomb!....also great on hand guns too!

tsmgguy
March 23, 2009, 17:39
Let me see if I can summarize: The shooters lubing their gas systems are happy with their choice of lubes. Those shooting dry are happy because they are following the original instructions. So, to lube, or not to lube: take your pick!

StoneyCreekMrMauser
July 12, 2009, 00:45
Originally posted by tsmgguy
So, to lube, or not to lube: take your pick!

That's always the question, isn't it?:tongue:

IRONWORKER
September 12, 2009, 00:50
As far as rust protection goes ATF fluid (Dextron 3) is not only the best that I've used but the cheapest - IW

ltcboy
September 12, 2009, 01:18
Well, as far as greasing my rifles... I use good old fashioned bacon grease. Works great, can cook me up a sandwich, let the grease drain off into a napkin then lube it all over the parts. Great think is, my FAL smells like you want to eat when you shoot it.


Mike

cpd109
September 12, 2009, 06:51
Is Tetra better than Miltec? If so, how? And if you respond, have you used miltec before? I am always looking for an upgrade even though I am satsified with Miltec.

gunnut1
September 14, 2009, 10:42
I use a very thin layer of Corrosion X. It actually bonds to the metal at the molectular level.

As far as I am concerned, CorrosionX trumps all other oils.

ostrobothnian
September 14, 2009, 11:14
http://www.gunslick.com/

Been using this stuff. Light film. No problems.

Badman400
January 30, 2010, 16:03
Noob here, so take it for what it's worth...

I've used almost everything mentioned in this thread over the years and still do some of it occasionally, but...I use Eezox where I need a light weight oil with no residue left and excellent anti-rust protection.

I try to break in every new barrel with Militec, but from then on it's Eezox for my weapons. :shades:

panzer
January 30, 2010, 20:03
I use Mobil one now for the last year. After cleaning it off it seems to have impregnated the steel and keeps it slick and clean. ZERO malfunctions.


And as far as miltech.... we have a word for that in english.... transmission fluid. Another good word for it is fraudulent. Seems the cat got out of the bag and that its essentially all that it is. ATF. and it never worked worth a damn for what i needed it to.

Kev the aussie
May 07, 2010, 14:54
I have always given my gas piston and plug a light wipe with some CLP after cleaning, I have had no adverse effects because of it. I can't really even say that I have seen a significant amount of smoke because of it.
I am ex-Australian Army and carried an L1A1 and our SOP was to clean and lube the gas system with CLP. WD40 was considered a major foul on the gas system per Army regs.

I would highly recommend staying away from your gas system with dremels, wire brushes and steel wool. If you need to clean it a good trick is to take a piece of burlap sacking, stick it over your knee and give your piston a good rub on it...comes up looking like new and its not overly abrasive.

gunnut1
May 07, 2010, 21:46
WD40 was considered a major foul on the gas system per Army regs.

WD40 is bad by any regs!!!! Never use WD40 on you firearms. WD=water displacing.

Lightly oil the gas system then wipe the excess off. You will not have any problems.

Windustsearch
May 09, 2010, 11:47
I don't use any oil in the gas system. I just clean it up with solvent, wipe it off and put it back together.

Even in this somewhat humid area that has worked fine on my FAL for 14 years.

dtom29
May 29, 2010, 03:01
WD 40 is excellent for flushing after shooting corrosive ammo. Just remember it isnít good for long term protection.

gunnut1
May 29, 2010, 10:24
Originally posted by dtom29
WD 40 is excellent for flushing after shooting corrosive ammo. Just remember it isnít good for long term protection.

WD40 is only good for going in the trash can. If you leave it on your guns, it will turn to varnish and not be worth a tinkers dam for anything. WD40 is 75% solvent. I wouldn't use WD40 on your guns and it has never touched mine. I don't even own a can of WD 40.

Get a genuine gun oil. I recommend Corrosion X. No I do not work for CorrosionX but I am a loyal customer. Anything but wd40.

Ya know what WD 40 stands for? WD=Water displacing. 40=Formula 40.

DYNOMIKE
June 27, 2010, 15:32
Originally posted by dtom29
WD 40 is excellent for flushing after shooting corrosive ammo. Just remember it isnít good for long term protection.

Can't tellya how many cans of WD-40 I went through cleaning my 10-22's when I was a Kid..
We would shoot them until they pretty much quite running, hose them out with WD and and keep shooting... When done we hosed them down again, ran a few patches down the bore W/Hoppes, wiped them down with good oil and put them away till next time..

Didn't know it would neutralize the properties of corrosive ammo though?
If it's true that's good info..

As far as the FAL gas system, I clean it then wipe it down with oil and call it good.
May try some Synthetic oil in a couple Autoloaders just to see how it does.
Been tossing it around for some time having read the idea many times.

W.E.G.
June 27, 2010, 17:14
WD-40 is excellent for removing cosmoline from the innards of AK-47 magazines, and for removing Obama bumper stickers from used cars.

cpd109
June 27, 2010, 20:56
Originally posted by W.E.G.
WD-40 is excellent for removing cosmoline from the innards of AK-47 magazines, and for removing Obama bumper stickers from used cars.

While I have owned some AK47 mags, I'd never own a car that ever had a Barry sticker on it. So I'd never have to soil WD40 that way.

Nulook45
July 20, 2010, 14:13
Well ordanarly id say wipe with a oil soaked rag but after checking out the gas block on my new to me fal and finding crusty RUST caked in there i used some PB rustbuster and a drill with a 45 cal brush and scrubed it clean the gas adjustment nut was dificult to move also untill the PB went in and soaked for awhile now ill keep that clean i was alittle suspicious when i saw the AMMO the previous owner gave me with the rifle 1974 OVF Indian Corrosive and it wasnt in the best of shape ,The AMMO that is the rifle appeared Clean good bore Crome Lined 18 inches just a really stiff gas adjustment knob till i pulled it apart now it will get cleaned and oiled every time i go out and after i burn up the 100 rounds i got with it only non corrosive ammo will do. PB rust buster is a serious penatrant it losens Rust ,Paint and about everything else so use it sparingly
Jim
:fal:

JasonB
October 30, 2010, 09:16
Originally posted by CC
When I first got an AK-47. Many people told me to never lube the gas system. I didn't and it rusted. The gas piston never did rust just the gas tube.

That probably comes from using com-bloc ammo in it that is not as non-corrosive as they claim. The piston is likely chromed or stainless?

Hoppe's #9 and probably other similar bore cleaners has corrosion inhibitors in it without being oily.

kayakpirate
October 30, 2010, 22:23
Originally posted by JasonB


Hoppe's #9 and probably other similar bore cleaners has corrosion inhibitors in it without being oily.


That sounds like a good idea.
I didnt know that about Hoppe's.
:beer: :beer:

gunnut1
October 31, 2010, 14:10
Originally posted by JasonB


That probably comes from using com-bloc ammo in it that is not as non-corrosive as they claim. The piston is likely chromed or stainless?

Hoppe's #9 and probably other similar bore cleaners has corrosion inhibitors in it without being oily.

Hoppe's #9 is a great cleaner. I will not protece against corrosion.

Try some CorrosionX. It is designed to protect against corrosion.

JasonB
November 02, 2010, 04:50
Front label:

"HOPPE's No. 9 Solvent cleans bores and prevents RUST (the all caps theirs, not mine) in Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, and Revolvers."

The instructions on the side of the bottle


"....Examine the bore. If no dark spots are seen, saturate a patch with Hoppe's No. 9 and push through slowly so as to annoint all the bore to prevent rust....."

Edited to add the label can be seen on Midway's site along with their product description:

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct/?productnumber=554942

gunnut1
November 03, 2010, 13:17
JasonB said:

Front label:

"HOPPE's No. 9 Solvent cleans bores and prevents RUST (the all caps theirs, not mine) in Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, and Revolvers."

The instructions on the side of the bottle


"....Examine the bore. If no dark spots are seen, saturate a patch with Hoppe's No. 9 and push through slowly so as to annoint all the bore to prevent rust....."

Edited to add the label can be seen on Midway's site along with their product description:

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduc...ctnumber=554942

That is true for the short term. Hoppe's will dry out on the surface.

CorrosionX polar bonds with the metal. It penetrate the metal 1 molecule to form a barrier between the metal and the atmosphere.

http://www.corrosionx.com/tech.html

I have used nothing but CorrosionX on my guns for many years and I have only had 1 problem with rust. I got lazy and did not properly clean one of my Yugo SKS after shooting corrosive ammo. I forgot to treat the area around the gas block with CorrosionX and it rusted on my. NOT the fault of the product but the fault of the owner.

Badman400
November 03, 2010, 14:29
Here are the links to two independent rust prohibitor tests.

This is why I still use Eezox a lot. Plus, it works for me.

http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html

http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html

gunnut1
November 03, 2010, 16:40
I don't like EEzox because is stinks to high heaven. And I have not proven to myself that it is better than CorrosionX. EEzox is a dry protector and CX is a liquid protector. I like the claneing properties of EEzox but as stated, I hate the strong smell.

JasonB
November 05, 2010, 16:32
Originally posted by gunnut1


That is true for the short term. Hoppe's will dry out on the surface.




True, and the evaporated kerosene leaves behind a film that is a rust preventive.

gunnut1
November 05, 2010, 17:52
True, and the evaporated kerosene leaves behind a film that is a rust preventive.

And that so called rust preventative will cause the gun to jam also. And it is not part of the gun but rather sits on the top of the metal and will readly rub off.

JasonB
November 05, 2010, 20:29
Originally posted by gunnut1


And that so called rust preventative will cause the gun to jam also. And it is not part of the gun but rather sits on the top of the metal and will readly rub off.

Interesting how it started out that #9 has no rust preventive though.

gunnut1
November 06, 2010, 14:26
Whatever.